Other Authors

Quotes of Author: Other-authors

201.
Christian civility does not commit us to a relativistic perspective. Being civil doesn’t mean that we cannot criticize what goes on around us. Civility doesn’t require us to approve of what other people believe and do. It is one thing to insist that other people have the right to express their basic convictions; it is another thing to say that they are right in doing so. Civility requires us to live by the first of these principles. But it does not commit us to the second formula. To say that all beliefs and values deserve to be treated as if they were on a par is to endorse relativism – a perspective that is incompatible with Christian faith and practice. Christian civility does not mean refusing to make judgments about what is good and true. For one thing, it really isn’t possible to be completely nonjudgmental. Even telling someone else that she is being judgmental is a rather judgmental thing to do!

Christian civility does not commit us to a relativistic perspective. Being civil doesn't mean that we cannot criticize what goes on around us. Civility doesn't require us to approve of what other people believe and do. It is one thing to insist that other people have the right to express their basic convictions; it is another thing to say that they are right in doing so. Civility requires us to live by the first of these principles. But it does not commit us to the second formula. To say that all beliefs and values deserve to be treated as if they were on a par is to endorse relativism – a perspective that is incompatible with Christian faith and practice. Christian civility does not mean refusing to make judgments about what is good and true. For one thing, it really isn’t possible to be completely nonjudgmental. Even telling someone else that she is being judgmental is a rather judgmental thing to do (Richard Mouw)!

Reference:   Uncommon Decency, IVP, 1992, p. 20-21.


202.
In times of revival, God manifests His glorious presence in the midst of His people.  The awesome sense of His holiness produces overwhelming conviction of sinfulness, leading to deep repentance.  The greater measure of the Spirit rejuvenates an authentic church; everywhere there is bountiful praise and worship, hunger for truth, and whole-hearted service to God, overflowing into powerful evangelization of the world.

In times of revival, God manifests His glorious presence in the midst of His people.  The awesome sense of His holiness produces overwhelming conviction of sinfulness, leading to deep repentance.  The greater measure of the Spirit rejuvenates an authentic church; everywhere there is bountiful praise and worship, hunger for truth, and whole-hearted service to God, overflowing into powerful evangelization of the world (Lowell Yoder).

Reference:   The Need for Revival, Revival Commentary, v. 1, n. 2, p. 2.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Revival-Results
203.
The Christian faith is unchangeable, which is not to say that men and women of every generation do not need to find it, experience it, and live it; but it does mean that every new doctrine that arises, even though its legitimacy may be plausible asserted, is a false doctrine. All claims to convey some additional revelation to that which has been given by God in this body of truth are false claims and must be rejected.

The Christian faith is unchangeable, which is not to say that men and women of every generation do not need to find it, experience it, and live it; but it does mean that every new doctrine that arises, even though its legitimacy may be plausible asserted, is a false doctrine. All claims to convey some additional revelation to that which has been given by God in this body of truth are false claims and must be rejected (George Lawlor).

Reference:   Translation and Exposition of the Epistle of Jude, P&R, 1972, p. 45. Used by Permission.


204.
So few believe in common grace, because the human heart will not admit that a world without common grace is what we deserve.

So few believe in common grace, because the human heart will not admit that a world without common grace is what we deserve (Jeff Hutchinson).

Reference:   Uncommon Belief, Tabletalk, Nov. 2004, p. 54, Used by Permission.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Grace-Common
205.
To repent is to accuse and condemn ourselves; to charge upon ourselves the desert of hell; to take part with God against ourselves, and to justify Him in all that He does against us; to be ashamed and confounded for our sins; to have them ever in our eyes and at all times upon our hearts that we may be in daily sorrow for them; to part with our right hands and eyes, that is, with those pleasurable sins which have been as dear to us as our lives, so as never to have more to do with them, and to hate them, so as to destroy them as things which by nature we are wholly disinclined to. For we naturally love and think well of ourselves, hide our deformities, lessen and excuse our faults, indulge ourselves in the things that please us, are mad upon our lusts, and follow them, though to our own destruction.

To repent is to accuse and condemn ourselves; to charge upon ourselves the desert of hell; to take part with God against ourselves, and to justify Him in all that He does against us; to be ashamed and confounded for our sins; to have them ever in our eyes and at all times upon our hearts that we may be in daily sorrow for them; to part with our right hands and eyes, that is, with those pleasurable sins which have been as dear to us as our lives, so as never to have more to do with them, and to hate them, so as to destroy them as things which by nature we are wholly disinclined to. For we naturally love and think well of ourselves, hide our deformities, lessen and excuse our faults, indulge ourselves in the things that please us, are mad upon our lusts, and follow them, though to our own destruction (Francis Fuller).


206.
It is a good thing to possess an accurate theology, but it is unsatisfactory unless that good theology also possesses us.

It is a good thing to possess an accurate theology, but it is unsatisfactory unless that good theology also possesses us (Charles Mitton).


207.
I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, all the friends I want to see. Our time is too short for pettiness, angry words, wounded feelings, crushed souls. Perhaps the measure of life is not in its length, but in its love.

I still find each day too short for all the thoughts I want to think, all the walks I want to take, all the books I want to read, all the friends I want to see. Our time is too short for pettiness, angry words, wounded feelings, crushed souls. Perhaps the measure of life is not in its length, but in its love (John Burroughs).


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Time
208.
Lost people matter to God, and so they must matter to us.

Lost people matter to God, and so they must matter to us (Keith Wright).


209.
We live in a post-vocational age. Without any theology of vocation we lapse into debilitating alternatives: fatalism (doing what is required by “the forces” and “the powers”); luck (which denies purposefulness in life and reduces our life to a bundle of accidents); karma (which ties performance to future rewards); nihilism (which denies that there is any good end to which the travail of history might lead); and, the most common alternative today, self-actualization (in which we invent the meaning and purpose of our lives, making us magicians). In contrast the biblical doctrine of vocation proposes that the whole of our lives finds meaning in relation to the sweet summons of a good God.

We live in a post-vocational age. Without any theology of vocation we lapse into debilitating alternatives: fatalism (doing what is required by “the forces” and “the powers”); luck (which denies purposefulness in life and reduces our life to a bundle of accidents); karma (which ties performance to future rewards); nihilism (which denies that there is any good end to which the travail of history might lead); and, the most common alternative today, self-actualization (in which we invent the meaning and purpose of our lives, making us magicians). In contrast the biblical doctrine of vocation proposes that the whole of our lives finds meaning in relation to the sweet summons of a good God (Paul Stevens).

Reference:   The Other Six Days: Vocation, Word, and Ministry in Biblical Perspective, Eerdmans, www.eerdmans.com, 1999, p. 72.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Work
210.
As God’s dear children, we, who are by grace adopted, are called into the fellowship of suffering, soon enough to be followed by stupendous glory, with the only begotten Son. The suffering precedes the glory; the cross precedes the crown, both in the order of experience of the eternal Son of God and also in that of adopted sons and daughters of God.

As God’s dear children, we, who are by grace adopted, are called into the fellowship of suffering, soon enough to be followed by stupendous glory, with the only begotten Son. The suffering precedes the glory; the cross precedes the crown, both in the order of experience of the eternal Son of God and also in that of adopted sons and daughters of God (Douglas Kelly).

Reference:   Partakers of Holiness, Tabletalk, Oct. 2004, p. 38, Used by Permission.


211.
Pause, then, and contemplate.  The eternal Son of God, Creator of the universe, worshiped and adored by angels and archangels, has offered Himself in your place.  He has offered Himself freely, willingly, and gladly, to endure the judgment that your sin deserves, and to endure it in a holy way – saying the perfect “yea and Amen!” to the holiness of the judgment, which your corrupt heart could never have said.  As far as atoning for your sins is concerned, the only thing you owe God is endless gratitude.

Pause, then, and contemplate. The eternal Son of God, Creator of the universe, worshiped and adored by angels and archangels, has offered Himself in your place. He has offered Himself freely, willingly, and gladly, to endure the judgment that your sin deserves, and to endure it in a holy way – saying the perfect “yea and Amen!” to the holiness of the judgment, which your corrupt heart could never have said. As far as atoning for your sins is concerned, the only thing you owe God is endless gratitude (Nick Needham).

Reference:   Obedience Unto Death, Tabletalk, April 2004, p. 14, Used by Permission.


212.
All Word and no Spirit, we dry up; all Spirit and no Word, we blow up; both Word and Spirit, we grow up.

All Word and no Spirit, we dry up; all Spirit and no Word, we blow up; both Word and Spirit, we grow up (David Watson).

Reference:   I Believe in the Church, Eerdmans, 1979. www.eerdmans.com.


213.
Goodness breaks the spell the enemy tries to cast and renders him powerless.

Goodness breaks the spell the enemy tries to cast and renders him powerless (Dan Allender).

Reference:   Copied from Bold Love by Dan Allender, 1992. Used by Permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All Rights Reserved.


214.
God has removed the sting of death for each believer. I should save my sorrow for those without Christ and seek to win them.

God has removed the sting of death for each believer. I should save my sorrow for those without Christ and seek to win them (Larry Clark).


215.
The Greatest Man in History… Jesus; Had no servants, yet they called Him Master. Had no degree, yet they called Him Teacher. Had no medicines, yet they called Him Healer. He had no army, yet kings feared Him. He won no military battles, yet He conquered the world. He did not live in a castle, yet they called Him Lord, He ruled no nations, yet they called Him King, He committed no crime, yet they crucified Him. He was buried in a tomb, yet He lives today.

The Greatest Man in History... Jesus; Had no servants, yet they called Him Master. Had no degree, yet they called Him Teacher. Had no medicines, yet they called Him Healer. He had no army, yet kings feared Him. He won no military battles, yet He conquered the world. He did not live in a castle, yet they called Him Lord, He ruled no nations, yet they called Him King, He committed no crime, yet they crucified Him. He was buried in a tomb, yet He lives today (Lyle C Rollings III, 2008).


216.
He was born in an obscure village, the child of a peasant woman. He grew up in another obscure village, where He worked in a carpenter shop until He was thirty. Then for three years He was an itinerant preacher. He never had a family or owned a home. He never set foot inside a big city. He never traveled two hundred miles from the place He was born. He never wrote a book, or held an office. He did none of the things that usually accompany greatness.  While He was still a young man, the tide of popular opinion turned against Him. His friends deserted Him. He was turned over to His enemies, and went through the mockery of a trial. He was nailed to a cross between two thieves. While He was dying, His executioners gambled for the only piece of property He had – His coat.  When He was dead, He was taken down and laid in a borrowed grave. Nineteen centuries have come and gone, and today He is the central figure for much of the human race. All the armies that ever marched, and all the navies that ever sailed, and all the parliaments that ever sat, and all the kings that ever reigned, put together, have not affected the life of man upon this earth as powerfully as this “One Solitary Life.”

He was born in an obscure village, the child of a peasant woman. He grew up in another obscure village, where He worked in a carpenter shop until He was thirty. Then for three years He was an itinerant preacher. He never had a family or owned a home. He never set foot inside a big city. He never traveled two hundred miles from the place He was born. He never wrote a book, or held an office. He did none of the things that usually accompany greatness.  While He was still a young man, the tide of popular opinion turned against Him. His friends deserted Him. He was turned over to His enemies, and went through the mockery of a trial. He was nailed to a cross between two thieves. While He was dying, His executioners gambled for the only piece of property He had – His coat.  When He was dead, He was taken down and laid in a borrowed grave. Nineteen centuries have come and gone, and today He is the central figure for much of the human race. All the armies that ever marched, and all the navies that ever sailed, and all the parliaments that ever sat, and all the kings that ever reigned, put together, have not affected the life of man upon this earth as powerfully as this “One Solitary Life” (James Francis).


217.
A vision gives life and if there is no vision, the seeds of death are being sown and it is just a matter of time until death will prevail.

A vision gives life and if there is no vision, the seeds of death are being sown and it is just a matter of time until death will prevail.

Reference:   From Effective Church Leadership by Harris W. Lee copyright © 1990 Augsburg Publishing House.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Vision
218.
America’s greatness has been the greatness of a free people who shared certain moral commitments.  Freedom without moral commitment is aimless and promptly self-destructive.

America’s greatness has been the greatness of a free people who shared certain moral commitments. Freedom without moral commitment is aimless and promptly self-destructive (John Gardner).


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Morality
Nation
219.
Recently I read again of a woman who simply decided one day to make such a commitment to pray, and my conscience was pricked.  But I knew myself well enough to know that something other than resolve was being called for.  I began to pray about praying.  I expressed to God my frustrated longings, my jaded sense of caution about trying again, my sense of failure over working at being more disciplined and regular.  I discovered something surprising happening from such simple praying:  I was drawn into the presence of One who had, far more than I did, the power to keep me close.  I found my focus subtly shifting away from my efforts to God’s, from rigor to grace, from rigidity to relationship.  I soon realized that this was happening regularly.  I was praying much more.  I became less worried about the mechanics and methods, and in turn I was more motivated.  And God so cares for us, I realized anew, that He Himself helps us pray.  When we “do not know what we ought to pray for… the Spirit Himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express” (Rom. 8:26).

Recently I read again of a woman who simply decided one day to make such a commitment to pray, and my conscience was pricked.  But I knew myself well enough to know that something other than resolve was being called for.  I began to pray about praying.  I expressed to God my frustrated longings, my jaded sense of caution about trying again, my sense of failure over working at being more disciplined and regular.  I discovered something surprising happening from such simple praying:  I was drawn into the presence of One who had, far more than I did, the power to keep me close.  I found my focus subtly shifting away from my efforts to God’s, from rigor to grace, from rigidity to relationship.  I soon realized that this was happening regularly.  I was praying much more.  I became less worried about the mechanics and methods, and in turn I was more motivated.  And God so cares for us, I realized anew, that He Himself helps us pray.  When we “do not know what we ought to pray for… the Spirit Himself intercedes for us with groans that words cannot express” (Rom. 8:26) (Timothy Jones).

Reference:   What Can I Say? Christianity Today, Nov. 5, 1990, p. 28.


220.
There is the pride of being “radical” or the pride of being “realistic.”There is the pride of being able to “spot a sinner” or the pride of being able to “notice the hurting.”There is the pride of doing “only what you want to do” or the pride of doing “whatever needs doing.”There is the pride at being “unbiased” or the pride of being “loyal.”There is the pride of being “perfectly honest” or the pride of being able to “get along with people.”There is the pride at being “on top of an issue” or the pride of having an “open mind.”There is the pride at all one has “acquired” or the pride over all one has “sacrificed.”There is the pride over “how great our church is” or the pride of “knowing exactly what’s going wrong.”There is the pride of being a “victorious Christian” or the pride of being one who “struggles with God.”There is the pride that says “I can stand tall” or the pride that says “I’m willing to get on my knees.”There is the pride that says “our church is growing” or the pride that says “we’re staying faithful.”Pride comes in many forms but has only one end: destruction.

There is the pride of being “radical” or the pride of being “realistic.” There is the pride of being able to “spot a sinner” or the pride of being able to “notice the hurting.” There is the pride of doing “only what you want to do” or the pride of doing “whatever needs doing.” There is the pride at being “unbiased” or the pride of being “loyal.” There is the pride of being “perfectly honest” or the pride of being able to “get along with people.” There is the pride at being “on top of an issue” or the pride of having an “open mind.” There is the pride at all one has “acquired” or the pride over all one has “sacrificed.” There is the pride over “how great our church is” or the pride of “knowing exactly what's going wrong.” There is the pride of being a “victorious Christian” or the pride of being one who “struggles with God.” There is the pride that says “I can stand tall” or the pride that says “I'm willing to get on my knees.” There is the pride that says “our church is growing” or the pride that says “we're staying faithful.” Pride comes in many forms but has only one end: destruction (Dick Rasanen).

Reference:   Leadership, v. 7, n. 3.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Pride-Types
221.
It is very rare for the spirituality of a group of Christians to exceed that of its leaders.

It is very rare for the spirituality of a group of Christians to exceed that of its leaders (John Benton).

Reference:   Quoted in: Reformation and Revival Journal, v. 13, n. 3, p. 77.


222.
The Pharisees were desperately determined to not break the laws of God. Consequently they devised a system to keep them from even coming close to angering God. They contrived a “fence” of Pharisaic rules that, if man would keep them, would guarantee a safe distance between himself and the laws of God… The “fence” or “hedge” laws accumulated into hundreds over the years and were passed around orally. Soon it became apparent that they were far from optional. These laws became every inch as important as the scriptural laws and in some instances far more crucial.

The Pharisees were desperately determined to not break the laws of God. Consequently they devised a system to keep them from even coming close to angering God. They contrived a “fence” of Pharisaic rules that, if man would keep them, would guarantee a safe distance between himself and the laws of God… The “fence” or “hedge” laws accumulated into hundreds over the years and were passed around orally. Soon it became apparent that they were far from optional. These laws became every inch as important as the scriptural laws and in some instances far more crucial (William Coleman).

Reference:   The Pharisees Guide to Total Holiness, Bethany House Publishers, 1977, p. 8-9.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Legalism-Causes
223.
The will of God – nothing less, nothing more, nothing else.

The will of God – nothing less, nothing more, nothing else (Fredrick Marsh).


224.
Tenderness will win hearts so hardened that nothing else can move them. Truth spoken in love goes directly to the heart of the hearer and calls forth a kind response… It overcomes prejudice and hardness… It melts and wins where the most logical argument, the most terrible warning, and the severest threatening would produce no more impression than the falling of dew upon a block of granite.

Tenderness will win hearts so hardened that nothing else can move them. Truth spoken in love goes directly to the heart of the hearer and calls forth a kind response… It overcomes prejudice and hardness… It melts and wins where the most logical argument, the most terrible warning, and the severest threatening would produce no more impression than the falling of dew upon a block of granite (Wilson Hogg).

Reference:   A Hand-Book of Homiletics and Pastoral Theology, Free Methodist Publishing House, 1919, p. 342-343.


225.
“Our Father in Heaven, hallowed be Your name” (Mt. 6:9). This petition condemns much more than profane language. Whenever we introduce the Divine name in our speech uselessly and triflingly – when we employ it to turn a sentence, or give emphasis to a statement, or point to an anecdote – when we make the Divine Word the subject-matter of jokes, punning on solemn truths of Revelation, and quoting Scripture with ludicrous adaptations to provoke mirth. And even when we take this great name on our lips in worship without any endeavor to feel the homage it demands, we violate the spirit of this prayer.

“Our Father in Heaven, hallowed be Your name” (Mt. 6:9). This petition condemns much more than profane language. Whenever we introduce the Divine name in our speech uselessly and triflingly – when we employ it to turn a sentence, or give emphasis to a statement, or point to an anecdote – when we make the Divine Word the subject-matter of jokes, punning on solemn truths of Revelation, and quoting Scripture with ludicrous adaptations to provoke mirth. And even when we take this great name on our lips in worship without any endeavor to feel the homage it demands, we violate the spirit of this prayer (Newman Hall).

Reference:   Meditations on the Lord's Prayer.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: God-Name
226.
God often comforts us, not by changing the circumstances of our lives, but by changing our attitude toward them.

God often comforts us, not by changing the circumstances of our lives, but by changing our attitude toward them (S.H.B. Masterman).


227.
Nowhere in the New Testament do any of the Greek words translated “fellowship” imply fun times. Rather, they talk of, for example, “The fellowship of the ministering to the saints” (2 Cor. 8:4) as sacrificial service and financial aid (see for example, 1 Tim. 6:18). Elsewhere, Paul was thankful for the Philippian believers’ “fellowship in the gospel” (Phil. 1:5), for he knew that “inasmuch as both in my bonds, and in the defense and confirmation of the gospel, ye all are partakers (same word as fellowship) of my grace” (Phil. 1:7). This sort of fellowship may even bring persecution. We are to emulate Christ’s humility and self-sacrificial love (Phil. 2:5-8) through the “fellowship of the Spirit” (Phil. 2:1). In some way known only partially to us, we have the privilege of knowing “the fellowship of His sufferings, being made conformable unto His death” (Phil. 3:10), and even the communion (i.e. fellowship) of the blood…and body of Christ” (1 Cor. 10:16).

Nowhere in the New Testament do any of the Greek words translated “fellowship” imply fun times. Rather, they talk of, for example, “The fellowship of the ministering to the saints” (2 Cor. 8:4) as sacrificial service and financial aid (see for example, 1 Tim. 6:18). Elsewhere, Paul was thankful for the Philippian believers’ “fellowship in the gospel” (Phil. 1:5), for he knew that “inasmuch as both in my bonds, and in the defense and confirmation of the gospel, ye all are partakers (same word as fellowship) of my grace” (Phil. 1:7). This sort of fellowship may even bring persecution. We are to emulate Christ’s humility and self-sacrificial love (Phil. 2:5-8) through the “fellowship of the Spirit” (Phil. 2:1). In some way known only partially to us, we have the privilege of knowing “the fellowship of His sufferings, being made conformable unto His death” (Phil. 3:10), and even the communion (i.e. fellowship) of the blood...and body of Christ” (1 Cor. 10:16) (J.D. Morris).


228.
There are three kinds of giving: grudge giving, duty giving, and thanksgiving. Grudge giving says, “I have to”; duty giving says, “I ought to”; thanksgiving says, “I want to.”

There are three kinds of giving: grudge giving, duty giving, and thanksgiving. Grudge giving says, “I have to”; duty giving says, “I ought to”; thanksgiving says, “I want to” (Robert Rodenmeyer).

Reference:   Quoted in John Blanchard, Gathered Gold, Evangelical Press, 1984, p. 113.


229.
Missionary zeal does not grow out of intellectual beliefs, nor out of theological arguments, but out of love.

Missionary zeal does not grow out of intellectual beliefs, nor out of theological arguments, but out of love (Roland Allen).


230.
I have but one candle of life to burn, and I would rather burn it out in a land filled with darkness than in a land flooded with light.

I have but one candle of life to burn, and I would rather burn it out in a land filled with darkness than in a land flooded with light (John Falconer).


231.
When the will of God crosses the will of man, somebody has to die.

When the will of God crosses the will of man, somebody has to die (Addison Leitch).


232.
Peacemakers carry about with them an atmosphere in which quarrels die a natural death.

Peacemakers carry about with them an atmosphere in which quarrels die a natural death (Roddy Archibald).


233.
7 A’s of Confession:1. Address everyone involved and only them. Talk to them about my faults. Do it right away and be persistent. Only talk to people who are part of the problem or part of the solution.2. Avoid “if”, “but”, “maybe”. That’s just blaming the other party and finding fault with them for my own failure. “If I offended you”, “Maybe I was wrong”, “If you hadn’t said that”, “I’m sorry, but you..”3. Admit specifically what you did, when possible.4. Apologize – express your sorrow for your sin5. Ask for forgiveness. Most people leave this out. The other party might be 99% wrong, but this isn’t about them right now. It’s about your own log.6. Accept the consequences. Make restitution. It’s what you ought to do. Don’t demand that they pretend nothing happened.7. Alter your behavior. You won’t be perfect, but you’ll get better. Repent before God.

7 A’s of Confession: 1. Address everyone involved and only them. Talk to them about my faults. Do it right away and be persistent. Only talk to people who are part of the problem or part of the solution. 2. Avoid “if”, “but”, “maybe”. That’s just blaming the other party and finding fault with them for my own failure. “If I offended you”, “Maybe I was wrong”, “If you hadn’t said that”, “I’m sorry, but you..” 3. Admit specifically what you did, when possible. 4. Apologize - express your sorrow for your sin 5. Ask for forgiveness. Most people leave this out. The other party might be 99% wrong, but this isn’t about them right now. It’s about your own log. 6. Accept the consequences. Make restitution. It’s what you ought to do. Don’t demand that they pretend nothing happened. 7. Alter your behavior. You won’t be perfect, but you’ll get better. Repent before God (Robert Williams).


234.
How to Turn a Disagreement into a Feud:1. Be sure to develop and maintain a healthy fear of conflict, letting your own feelings build up so you are in an explosive frame of mind.2. If you must state your concerns, be as vague and general as possible. Then the other person cannot do anything practical to change the situation.3. Assume you know all the facts and you are totally right. The use of a clinching Bible verse is helpful. Speak prophetically for truth and justice; do most of the talking.4. With a touch of defiance, announce your willingness to talk with anyone who wishes to discuss the problem with you. But do not take steps to initiate such conversation.5. Latch tenaciously onto whatever evidence you can find that shows the other person is merely jealous of you.6. Judge the motivation of the other party on any previous experience that showed failure or unkindness. Keep track of any angry words.7. If the discussion should, alas, become serious, view the issue as a win/lose struggle. Avoid possible solutions and go for total victory and unconditional surrender. Don’t get too many options on the table.8. Pass the buck! If you are about to get cornered into a solution, indicate you are without power to settle; you need your partner, spouse, bank, whatever.

How to Turn a Disagreement into a Feud: 1. Be sure to develop and maintain a healthy fear of conflict, letting your own feelings build up so you are in an explosive frame of mind. 2. If you must state your concerns, be as vague and general as possible. Then the other person cannot do anything practical to change the situation. 3. Assume you know all the facts and you are totally right. The use of a clinching Bible verse is helpful. Speak prophetically for truth and justice; do most of the talking. 4. With a touch of defiance, announce your willingness to talk with anyone who wishes to discuss the problem with you. But do not take steps to initiate such conversation. 5. Latch tenaciously onto whatever evidence you can find that shows the other person is merely jealous of you. 6. Judge the motivation of the other party on any previous experience that showed failure or unkindness. Keep track of any angry words. 7. If the discussion should, alas, become serious, view the issue as a win/lose struggle. Avoid possible solutions and go for total victory and unconditional surrender. Don't get too many options on the table. 8. Pass the buck! If you are about to get cornered into a solution, indicate you are without power to settle; you need your partner, spouse, bank, whatever (Ron Kraybill).

Reference:   Quoted in Tell it to the Church, Lynn Buzzard, David C. Cook, 1982, p. 23.


235.
The final estimate of men shows that history cares not an iota for the rank or title a man has borne, or the office he has held, but only the quality of his deeds and the character of his mind and heart.

The final estimate of men shows that history cares not an iota for the rank or title a man has borne, or the office he has held, but only the quality of his deeds and the character of his mind and heart (C.W. Hall).

Reference:   Samuel Logan Brengle, Salvation Army, 1933, p. 274.


236.
An unbridled tongue is the chariot of the devil, wherein he rides in triumph… The course of an unruly tongue is to proceed from evil to worse, to begin with foolishness, and go on with bitterness, and to end in mischief and madness (Ecclesiastes 10:13).

An unbridled tongue is the chariot of the devil, wherein he rides in triumph… The course of an unruly tongue is to proceed from evil to worse, to begin with foolishness, and go on with bitterness, and to end in mischief and madness (Ecclesiastes 10:13) (Edward Reyner).

Reference:   A Puritan Golden Treasury, compiled by I.D.E. Thomas, by permission of Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA. 2000, p. 296.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Communication
237.
Any blessing which is bestowed by the Father upon His undeserving children must be considered to be an act of grace. We fail to appreciate the mercy of the Lord if we think that by our doing something we have forced (or even coerced) God to grant that blessing which we have asked for.

Any blessing which is bestowed by the Father upon His undeserving children must be considered to be an act of grace. We fail to appreciate the mercy of the Lord if we think that by our doing something we have forced (or even coerced) God to grant that blessing which we have asked for (David Smith).

Reference:   Fasting:  A Neglected Discipline, Christian Literature Crusade, 1954, p. 44.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Rewards-Present
238.
Because marriage comes from God above and not from man or beast below, it involves moral, not merely physical problems. A sin against the commandment of purity is a sin against God, not simply the outraging of convention, the thoughtlessness of youth, the evidence of bad taste. The Savior tells us that, when God’s children are joined in wedlock, they are united by God, and beneath the evident strength and courage and love that this divine direction promises there is a penetrating, ominous warning. Those who tamper with God’s institution have lighted the fuse to the explosive of retributive justice. Marriage is so holy that of all social sins its violation invokes the most appalling consequences. Sodom and Gomorrah were burned out of existence because of the vile disregard of the holiness of marriage. David’s rule over Israel was blackened by his marital follies and by the royal lust that forgot God and dedicated itself to raging passion. The Hebrew people dropped out of the family of nations largely because of the vicious practices associated with Balaam worship.

Because marriage comes from God above and not from man or beast below, it involves moral, not merely physical problems. A sin against the commandment of purity is a sin against God, not simply the outraging of convention, the thoughtlessness of youth, the evidence of bad taste. The Savior tells us that, when God's children are joined in wedlock, they are united by God, and beneath the evident strength and courage and love that this divine direction promises there is a penetrating, ominous warning. Those who tamper with God's institution have lighted the fuse to the explosive of retributive justice. Marriage is so holy that of all social sins its violation invokes the most appalling consequences. Sodom and Gomorrah were burned out of existence because of the vile disregard of the holiness of marriage. David's rule over Israel was blackened by his marital follies and by the royal lust that forgot God and dedicated itself to raging passion. The Hebrew people dropped out of the family of nations largely because of the vicious practices associated with Balaam worship (Walter Maier).

Reference:   For Better, Not for Worse, St. Louis: Concordia, 1935, p. 83.


239.
Where Christ is truly preached, there is the gospel; and where the gospel is truly believed, there is the church.

Where Christ is truly preached, there is the gospel; and where the gospel is truly believed, there is the church (Mark Ross).

Reference:   Unity, Liberty, Charity, September 2009, Tabletalk, p. 17. Used by Permission.


240.
A church is a hospital for sinners, not a museum for saints.

A church is a hospital for sinners, not a museum for saints (L.L. Nash)


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Church-Defined
241.
The holiest moment of the church service is the moment when God’s people – strengthened by preaching and sacrament – go out of the church door into the world to be the church. We don’t go to church, we are the church.

The holiest moment of the church service is the moment when God's people – strengthened by preaching and sacrament – go out of the church door into the world to be the church. We don't go to church, we are the church (Ernest Southcott).


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Church-Defined
242.
The business of the preacher is to stick to the passage chosen and to set forth exclusively what it has to say or suggest, so that the ideas expressed and the principles enunciated during the course of the sermon plainly come out of the written Word of God, and have its authority for their support rather than just the opinion or the enthusiasm of their human expositor.

The business of the preacher is to stick to the passage chosen and to set forth exclusively what it has to say or suggest, so that the ideas expressed and the principles enunciated during the course of the sermon plainly come out of the written Word of God, and have its authority for their support rather than just the opinion or the enthusiasm of their human expositor (Alan Stibbs).

Reference:   Expounding God's Word, Inter-Varsity Press, 1960, p. 17.


243.
The punishment was meted out for such crimes as treason, desertion in the face of the enemy, robbery, piracy, assassination, sedition, etc. It continued in vogue in the Roman Empire till the day of Constantine, when it was abolished as an insult to Christianity. Among the Romans crucifixion was preceded by scourging, undoubtedly to hasten impending death. The victim then bore his own cross, or at least the upright beam, to the place of execution. This in itself proves that the structure was less ponderous than is commonly supposed. When he was tied to the cross nothing further was done and he was left to die from starvation. If he was nailed to the cross, at least in Judea, a stupefying drink was given him to deaden the agony. The number of nails used seems to have been indeterminate. A tablet, on which the feet rested or on which the body was partly supported, seems to have been a part of the cross to keep the wounds from tearing through the transfixed members (Iren., Adv. haer., ii.42). The suffering of death by crucifixion was intense, especially in hot climates. Severe local inflammation, coupled with an insignificant bleeding of the jagged wounds, produced traumatic fever, which was aggravated the exposure to the heat of the sun, the strained of the body and insufferable thirst. The swelled about the rough nails and the torn lacerated tendons and nerves caused excruciating agony. The arteries of the head and stomach were surcharged with blood and a terrific throbbing headache ensued. The mind was confused and filled with anxiety and dread foreboding. The victim of crucifixion literally died a thousand deaths. Tetanus not rarely supervened and the rigors of the attending convulsions would tear at the wounds and add to the burden of pain, till at last the bodily forces were exhausted and the victim sank to unconsciousness and death. The sufferings were so frightful that “even among the raging passions of war pity was sometimes excited” (BJ, V, xi, 1). The length of this agony was wholly determined by the constitution of the victim, but death rarely ensued before thirty-six hours had elapsed. Instances are on record of victims of the cross who survived their terrible injuries when taken down from the cross after many hours of suspension (Josephus, Vita, 75). Death was sometimes hastened by breaking the legs of the victims and by a hard blow delivered under the armpit before crucifixion. Crura fracta was a well-known Roman term (Cicero Phil. xiii.12). The sudden death of Christ evidently was a matter of astonishment (Mark 15:44). The peculiar symptoms mentioned by John (19:34) would seem to point to a rupture of the heart, of which the Savior died, independent of the cross itself, or perhaps hastened by its agony.

The punishment was meted out for such crimes as treason, desertion in the face of the enemy, robbery, piracy, assassination, sedition, etc. It continued in vogue in the Roman Empire till the day of Constantine, when it was abolished as an insult to Christianity. Among the Romans crucifixion was preceded by scourging, undoubtedly to hasten impending death. The victim then bore his own cross, or at least the upright beam, to the place of execution. This in itself proves that the structure was less ponderous than is commonly supposed. When he was tied to the cross nothing further was done and he was left to die from starvation. If he was nailed to the cross, at least in Judea, a stupefying drink was given him to deaden the agony. The number of nails used seems to have been indeterminate. A tablet, on which the feet rested or on which the body was partly supported, seems to have been a part of the cross to keep the wounds from tearing through the transfixed members (Iren., Adv. haer., ii.42). The suffering of death by crucifixion was intense, especially in hot climates. Severe local inflammation, coupled with an insignificant bleeding of the jagged wounds, produced traumatic fever, which was aggravated the exposure to the heat of the sun, the strained of the body and insufferable thirst. The swelled about the rough nails and the torn lacerated tendons and nerves caused excruciating agony. The arteries of the head and stomach were surcharged with blood and a terrific throbbing headache ensued. The mind was confused and filled with anxiety and dread foreboding. The victim of crucifixion literally died a thousand deaths. Tetanus not rarely supervened and the rigors of the attending convulsions would tear at the wounds and add to the burden of pain, till at last the bodily forces were exhausted and the victim sank to unconsciousness and death. The sufferings were so frightful that “even among the raging passions of war pity was sometimes excited” (BJ, V, xi, 1). The length of this agony was wholly determined by the constitution of the victim, but death rarely ensued before thirty-six hours had elapsed. Instances are on record of victims of the cross who survived their terrible injuries when taken down from the cross after many hours of suspension (Josephus, Vita, 75). Death was sometimes hastened by breaking the legs of the victims and by a hard blow delivered under the armpit before crucifixion. Crura fracta was a well-known Roman term (Cicero Phil. xiii.12). The sudden death of Christ evidently was a matter of astonishment (Mark 15:44). The peculiar symptoms mentioned by John (19:34) would seem to point to a rupture of the heart, of which the Savior died, independent of the cross itself, or perhaps hastened by its agony (Henry Dosker).

Reference:   International Encyclopedia of the Bible, 1915, Public Domain.


244.
We never, therefore, move on from the cross of Christ, only to a more profound understanding of the cross.

We never, therefore, move on from the cross of Christ, only to a more profound understanding of the cross(David Prior).

Reference:   Taken from “Message of 1 Corinthians: Life in the Local Church.” Copyright (c) 1985, p. 51, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship/USA. Used with permission of InterVarsity Press, P.O. Box 1400, Downers Grove, IL 60515. www.ivpress.com.


245.
People’s lives are beaten down enough. They don’t need more of it from the pulpit.

People’s lives are beaten down enough. They don’t need more of it from the pulpit (Richard Ganz).

Reference:   Preaching Grace


246.
No one whose senses have been exercised to know good or evil can but grieve over the sight of zealous souls seeking to be filled with the Holy Spirit while they are living in a state of moral carelessness and borderline sin. Whoever would be indwelt by the Spirit must judge his life for any hidden iniquities. He must expel from his heart everything that is out of accord with the character of God as revealed by the Holy Scriptures… There can be no tolerance of evil, no laughing off the things that God hates.

No one whose senses have been exercised to know good or evil can but grieve over the sight of zealous souls seeking to be filled with the Holy Spirit while they are living in a state of moral carelessness and borderline sin. Whoever would be indwelt by the Spirit must judge his life for any hidden iniquities. He must expel from his heart everything that is out of accord with the character of God as revealed by the Holy Scriptures… There can be no tolerance of evil, no laughing off the things that God hates (D.J. Fant).


247.
If we only knew how bad we are, we would welcome chastening because this is God’s way of getting rid of sin and its habits. But chastening is resented because we cannot believe that we have done anything worthy of it.

If we only knew how bad we are, we would welcome chastening because this is God’s way of getting rid of sin and its habits. But chastening is resented because we cannot believe that we have done anything worthy of it (John Sanderson).

Reference:   The Fruit of the Spirit, Zondervan, 1972, p. 71.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: God-Discipline
248.
Most do not consider that solemn oaths in a court of justice, or on other proper occasions, are wrong, provided they are taken with due reverence. Others, however, such as Quakers, take this verse in its most literal sense and will not swear any type of oath. But all oaths taken without necessity, or in common conversation, must be sinful, as well as all those expressions that are appeals to God, though persons think thereby to evade the guilt of swearing. Evil men and women are not bound by oaths; the godly have no need of them.

Most do not consider that solemn oaths in a court of justice, or on other proper occasions, are wrong, provided they are taken with due reverence. Others, however, such as Quakers, take this verse in its most literal sense and will not swear any type of oath. But all oaths taken without necessity, or in common conversation, must be sinful, as well as all those expressions that are appeals to God, though persons think thereby to evade the guilt of swearing. Evil men and women are not bound by oaths; the godly have no need of them (J.M. Freeman).

Reference:   J.M. Freeman and H.J. Chadwick, Manners and Customs of the Bible, Whitaker House, 1996. All quotations taken from books published by Whitaker House are used with permission of the publisher. Whitaker House books are available at Christian bookstores ev


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Vows
249.
God calls us to put our complaining to death, and to put on thanksgiving and gratitude as our garment and cologne.

God calls us to put our complaining to death, and to put on thanksgiving and gratitude as our garment and cologne (Jeff Hutchinson).

Reference:   Uncommon Belief, Tabletalk, Nov. 2004, p. 55, Used by Permission.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Complaining
250.
The Word, then, is the storehouse of all instruction. Look not for any new diverse doctrine to be taught thee by affliction, which is not in the Word. For, in truth, herein stands our teaching by affliction, that it fits and prepares us for the Word, by breaking and sub-dividing the stubbornness of our hearts, and making them pliable, and capable of the impression of the Word.

The Word, then, is the storehouse of all instruction. Look not for any new diverse doctrine to be taught thee by affliction, which is not in the Word. For, in truth, herein stands our teaching by affliction, that it fits and prepares us for the Word, by breaking and sub-dividing the stubbornness of our hearts, and making them pliable, and capable of the impression of the Word (Daniel Dyke).

Reference:   Quoted by C. H. Spurgeon, The Treasury of David, Baker, 1984, v. 4, p. 306.


251.
Behind every good biblical preacher is much hard labor in preparation (1 Tim 5:17; 2 Tim 2:15). However, only prayer can assure that his work is not wasted and that his message will spiritually impact the hearers. As the biblical preacher interweaves prayer with his preparation, he should focus on certain petitions:1. That he will receive God’s message…in spiritual as well as mental comprehension (1 Cor. 2:9-16).2. That God’s message will first grip his own heart in strong conviction (1 Thes. 1:5).3.  That he will clearly and correctly convey God’s message in the power of the Spirit in effective communication (1 Thes. 1:5).4.  That the Spirit will use the message to produce proper response and change, spiritual transformation (2 Cor. 3:18).5.  That the whole process and finished product will accomplish God’s purpose in glorification of God through Christ (1 Cor. 10:31; 1 Pet 4:11).

Behind every good biblical preacher is much hard labor in preparation (1 Tim 5:17; 2 Tim 2:15). However, only prayer can assure that his work is not wasted and that his message will spiritually impact the hearers. As the biblical preacher interweaves prayer with his preparation, he should focus on certain petitions: 1. That he will receive God's message…in spiritual as well as mental comprehension (1 Cor. 2:9-16). 2. That God's message will first grip his own heart in strong conviction (1 Thes. 1:5). 3. That he will clearly and correctly convey God's message in the power of the Spirit in effective communication (1 Thes. 1:5). 4. That the Spirit will use the message to produce proper response and change, spiritual transformation (2 Cor. 3:18). 5. That the whole process and finished product will accomplish God’s purpose in glorification of God through Christ (1 Cor. 10:31; 1 Pet 4:11) (Henry Holloman).

Reference:   Personal Letter from Henry Holloman quoted in: The Priority of Prayer in Preaching by James Rosscup, The Master’s Journal, Spring 1991, p. 39.


252.
Verily, they may preach even to paleness and faintness, until the bellows are burnt, until their lungs and vitals are consumed, and their hearers will never be the better; not one sinner will be converted until God is graciously pleased, by the efficacious working of His Spirit, to add His blessing to their labors and make His Word, in the mouth of the preacher, sharper than any two-edged sword in the heart of the hearer.  All will be in vain, to no saving purpose, until God is pleased to give the increase.  And in order to do this, God looks for their prayers to come up to His ears.  A praying minister is in the way to have a successful ministry.

Verily, they may preach even to paleness and faintness, until the bellows are burnt, until their lungs and vitals are consumed, and their hearers will never be the better; not one sinner will be converted until God is graciously pleased, by the efficacious working of His Spirit, to add His blessing to their labors and make His Word, in the mouth of the preacher, sharper than any two-edged sword in the heart of the hearer.  All will be in vain, to no saving purpose, until God is pleased to give the increase.  And in order to do this, God looks for their prayers to come up to His ears.  A praying minister is in the way to have a successful ministry (John Shaw).

Reference:   The Character of a Pastor According to God’s Heart Considered, Soli Deo Gloria, 1992, p. 10.


253.
The Law’s demands are inward, touching motive and desire, and are not concerned solely with outward action.

The Law’s demands are inward, touching motive and desire, and are not concerned solely with outward action (Ernest Keven).

Reference:   The Grace of Law, Baker, 1976, p. 63.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Law-Obedience
254.
In Jesus are riches – if you are poor; Honor – if you are despised; Friendship – if you are forsaken; Help – if you are injured; Mercy – if you are miserable; Joy – if you are disconsolate; Protection – if you are in danger; Deliverance – if you are a captive; Life – if you are mortal; and all things – if you have nothing at all.

In Jesus are riches – if you are poor; Honor – if you are despised; Friendship – if you are forsaken; Help – if you are injured; Mercy – if you are miserable; Joy – if you are disconsolate; Protection – if you are in danger; Deliverance – if you are a captive; Life – if you are mortal; and all things – if you have nothing at all (James Meikle).


255.
Approval junkies live as hostages to other people’s opinions and judgments regarding their thoughts, motives, feelings, or behaviors. Approval seekers look good; they have to… But people-pleasing isn’t godly, nor is it healthy. Appeasers usually end up feeling used, unappreciated, and driven to become all things to all people in order to maintain their image and receive continued approval. They appear giving but in fact they are enslaved to their insatiable need to be admired.

Approval junkies live as hostages to other people’s opinions and judgments regarding their thoughts, motives, feelings, or behaviors. Approval seekers look good; they have to... But people-pleasing isn’t godly, nor is it healthy. Appeasers usually end up feeling used, unappreciated, and driven to become all things to all people in order to maintain their image and receive continued approval. They appear giving but in fact they are enslaved to their insatiable need to be admired (Nancy Groom).

Reference:   Copied from Bondage to Bonding: Escaping Codependency, Embracing Biblical Love copyright 1991, p. 35, Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com, All rights reserved.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Man-Pleasing
256.
No preacher in the New Testament ever preached this to sinners! Search the Word for yourself to see! This giving mere “mental assent” to the facts of the gospel is not what the Bible calls “believing to the saving of the soul” (Heb. 10:39). The Christ of Scripture is LORD, and He must be received and bowed to as LORD: “As ye have therefore received Christ Jesus THE LORD, so walk ye in Him” (Col. 2:6). When Paul wrote to true believers in his day he knew nothing of those who had made “first-time decisions” for Christ, but still needed to make “second and third decisions” to follow Christ.

No preacher in the New Testament ever preached this to sinners! Search the Word for yourself to see! This giving mere “mental assent” to the facts of the gospel is not what the Bible calls “believing to the saving of the soul” (Heb. 10:39). The Christ of Scripture is LORD, and He must be received and bowed to as LORD: “As ye have therefore received Christ Jesus THE LORD, so walk ye in Him” (Col. 2:6). When Paul wrote to true believers in his day he knew nothing of those who had made “first-time decisions” for Christ, but still needed to make “second and third decisions” to follow Christ (William Bell).

Reference:   Modern Evangelism Unmasked.


257.
To read the Bible and not to meditate was seen as an unfruitful exercise: better to read one chapter and meditate afterward then to read several chapters and not to meditate. Likewise to meditate and not to pray was like preparing to run a race and never leaving the starting line. The three duties of reading Scripture, meditation, and prayer belonged together, and though each could be done occasionally on its own, as formal duties to God they were best done together.

To read the Bible and not to meditate was seen as an unfruitful exercise: better to read one chapter and meditate afterward then to read several chapters and not to meditate. Likewise to meditate and not to pray was like preparing to run a race and never leaving the starting line. The three duties of reading Scripture, meditation, and prayer belonged together, and though each could be done occasionally on its own, as formal duties to God they were best done together (Peter Toon).

Reference:   From Mind to Heart: Christian Meditation Today, Baker Book House, 1987, p. 93.


258.
Evangelism is communicating the gospel of Jesus Christ with the immediate intent of converting the hearer to faith in Christ, and with the ultimate intent of instructing the convert in the Word of God so that he can become a mature believer.

Evangelism is communicating the gospel of Jesus Christ with the immediate intent of converting the hearer to faith in Christ, and with the ultimate intent of instructing the convert in the Word of God so that he can become a mature believer (Michael Cocoris).

Reference:   Evangelism, A Biblical Approach, Moody, 1984, p. 14.


259.
Ours is an undisciplined age. The old disciplines are breaking down… Above all, the discipline of divine grace is derided as legalism or is entirely unknown to a generation that is largely illiterate in the Scriptures. We need the rugged strength of Christian character that can come only from discipline.

Ours is an undisciplined age. The old disciplines are breaking down… Above all, the discipline of divine grace is derided as legalism or is entirely unknown to a generation that is largely illiterate in the Scriptures. We need the rugged strength of Christian character that can come only from discipline (Victor Edman).

Reference:   The Disciplines of Life.


260.
Jesus is not to us as Christmas is to the world, here today and gone tomorrow.

Jesus is not to us as Christmas is to the world, here today and gone tomorrow.


261.
When God’s Word is being preached, you’re not merely receiving information about God. God Himself is addressing you through His Word.

When God’s Word is being preached, you’re not merely receiving information about God. God Himself is addressing you through His Word Jeff Purswell).

Reference:   Quoted in: Stop Dating the Church by Joshua Harris, p. 111.


262.
The gospel by itself does not save, but God through the gospel saves a person in Christ.

The gospel by itself does not save, but God through the gospel saves a person in Christ (Friedrich Grosheide).

Reference:   1 Corinthians, Eerdmans, 1953, p. 347.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Gospel-Defined
263.
Most men are not satisfied with the permanent output of their lives. Nothing can wholly satisfy the life of Christ within His followers except the adoption of Christ’s purpose toward the world He came to redeem. Fame, pleasure and riches are but husks and ashes in contrast with the boundless and abiding joy of working with God for the fulfillment of His eternal plans. The men who are putting everything into Christ’s undertaking are getting out of life its sweetest and most priceless rewards.

Most men are not satisfied with the permanent output of their lives. Nothing can wholly satisfy the life of Christ within His followers except the adoption of Christ’s purpose toward the world He came to redeem. Fame, pleasure and riches are but husks and ashes in contrast with the boundless and abiding joy of working with God for the fulfillment of His eternal plans. The men who are putting everything into Christ’s undertaking are getting out of life its sweetest and most priceless rewards (John Campbell White).

Reference:   The Laymen’s Missionary Movement, 1909.


264.
Many of us cannot reach the mission fields on our feet, but we can reach them on our knees.

Many of us cannot reach the mission fields on our feet, but we can reach them on our knees (Thomas Bach).

Reference:   Quoted by Curtis C. Thomas, Practical Wisdom for Pastors, Crossway Books, 2001, p. 182.


265.
Jesus is right. It is not the Christian doctrine of heaven that is a myth, but the humanistic dream of utopia.

Jesus is right. It is not the Christian doctrine of heaven that is a myth, but the humanistic dream of utopia (Roy Clements).

Reference:   Introducing Jesus, Kingsway, 1986, p. 103.