Other Authors

Quotes of Author: Other-authors

101.
Don’t pray to escape trouble. Don’t pray to be comfortable in your emotions. Pray to do the will of God in every situation. Nothing else is worth praying for.

Don't pray to escape trouble. Don't pray to be comfortable in your emotions. Pray to do the will of God in every situation. Nothing else is worth praying for (Samuel Shoemaker).


102.
No doctrine of the Christian religion is worth preserving which cannot be verified in daily life.

No doctrine of the Christian religion is worth preserving which cannot be verified in daily life (John Watson).


103.
When we depend upon organizations, we get what organizations can do; when we depend upon education, we get what education can do; when we depend upon man, we get what man can do; but when we depend upon prayer, we get what God can do.

When we depend upon organizations, we get what organizations can do; when we depend upon education, we get what education can do; when we depend upon man, we get what man can do; but when we depend upon prayer, we get what God can do (Amzi Dixon).


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Prayer-Power
104.
The time factor in prayer is very important. In the exercise of prayer God is not tied to our clocks. Neither is He at the other end of the phone to receive and answer our two-minute calls. It takes time to know the mind of God, to shut out the material things of earth and to be wholly abandoned.

The time factor in prayer is very important. In the exercise of prayer God is not tied to our clocks. Neither is He at the other end of the phone to receive and answer our two-minute calls. It takes time to know the mind of God, to shut out the material things of earth and to be wholly abandoned (Hugh McCullough).


105.
God is omniscient and knows everything. He has known everything from the beginning. Nothing is a surprise to God, nor does He ever come into possession of new knowledge. Thus God knows all people. But [foreknowledge] means more than an intellectual knowledge. It means that God knows some in a special way. In grace, in life from eternity. This is the initiative of our salvation. Redemption has its rise to God and not in man.

God is omniscient and knows everything. He has known everything from the beginning. Nothing is a surprise to God, nor does He ever come into possession of new knowledge. Thus God knows all people. But [foreknowledge] means more than an intellectual knowledge. It means that God knows some in a special way. In grace, in life from eternity. This is the initiative of our salvation. Redemption has its rise to God and not in man (J.P McBeth).


106.
A heathen philosopher once asked, “Where is God?” The Christian answered: “Let me first ask you, where is He not?”

A heathen philosopher once asked, “Where is God?” The Christian answered: “Let me first ask you, where is He not?” (John Arrowsmith).

Reference:   A Puritan Golden Treasury, compiled by I.D.E. Thomas, by permission of Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA. 2000, p. 120.


107.
When God’s people departed from Him (in the Old Testament biblical accounts) all the more emphasis was put upon His faithfulness, so that the only hope of His wayward people lay not only in His grace and mercy but also in His faithfulness, which stands in marked contrast with the faithlessness and inconstancy of His people.

When God's people departed from Him (in the Old Testament biblical accounts) all the more emphasis was put upon His faithfulness, so that the only hope of His wayward people lay not only in His grace and mercy but also in His faithfulness, which stands in marked contrast with the faithlessness and inconstancy of His people (Gaspar Hodge).

Reference:   International Standard Bible Encyclopedia, 1915, Entry for Faithfulness, Public Domain.


108.
The problem of evil assumes the existence of a world-purpose. What, we are really asking, is the purpose of suffering? It seems purposeless. Our question of the why of evil assumes the view that the world has a purpose, and what we want to know is how suffering fits into and advances this purpose. The modern view is that suffering has no purpose because nothing that happens has any purpose: the world is run by causes, not by purposes.

The problem of evil assumes the existence of a world-purpose. What, we are really asking, is the purpose of suffering? It seems purposeless. Our question of the why of evil assumes the view that the world has a purpose, and what we want to know is how suffering fits into and advances this purpose. The modern view is that suffering has no purpose because nothing that happens has any purpose: the world is run by causes, not by purposes (Walter Stace).

Reference:   Religion and the Modern Mind, 1953.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Evil-Problem
109.
Another reason [patience] is so hard to come by is that we often don’t like the way it comes. Romans 5:3 says, “Suffering produces endurance,” and James 1:3 says, “The testing of your faith produces steadfastness.” In both cases the product is patient endurance – the ability to remain under tremendous weight and pressure without succumbing. That which produces this is the difficult part: suffering, testing, trials. We would prefer an easier I way for the fruit to be produced, but this is God’s way!

Another reason [patience] is so hard to come by is that we often don’t like the way it comes. Romans 5:3 says, “Suffering produces endurance,” and James 1:3 says, “The testing of your faith produces steadfastness.” In both cases the product is patient endurance – the ability to remain under tremendous weight and pressure without succumbing. That which produces this is the difficult part: suffering, testing, trials. We would prefer an easier I way for the fruit to be produced, but this is God’s way (Robert Carver)!

Reference:   Wrath and Patience, Tabletalk, May 2008, p. 19, Used by Permission.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Patience
110.
If God were small enough to be understood He would not be big enough to be worshipped.

If God were small enough to be understood He would not be big enough to be worshipped (Evelyn Underhill).

Reference:   Quoted by Elisabeth Elliot, Secure in the Everlasting Arms, Revell, 2002, p. 91.


111.
In the world it is called Tolerance, but in hell it is called Despair, the sin that believes in nothing, cares for nothing, seeks to know nothing, interferes with nothing, enjoys nothing, hates nothing, finds purpose in nothing, lives for nothing, and remains alive because there is nothing for which it will die.

In the world it is called Tolerance, but in hell it is called Despair, the sin that believes in nothing, cares for nothing, seeks to know nothing, interferes with nothing, enjoys nothing, hates nothing, finds purpose in nothing, lives for nothing, and remains alive because there is nothing for which it will die (Dorothy Sayers).  


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Tolerance
112.
It is God’s good plan that sex not be thought of, principally, as a legitimate way to get a rush, but rather as God’s way of bringing man and wife to the point of greatest unity and, through that unity, propagating (for Himself) “a godly seed” (Mal. 2:15 KJV).

It is God’s good plan that sex not be thought of, principally, as a legitimate way to get a rush, but rather as God’s way of bringing man and wife to the point of greatest unity and, through that unity, propagating (for Himself) “a godly seed” (Mal. 2:15 KJV) (Timothy Bayly).

Reference:   Pastoral Leadership for Manhood and Womanhood, ed. Wayne Grudem and Dennis Rainey, Crossway, 2002, p. 145.


113.
Sexual relations within marriage are holy and good (Hebrews 13:4).  1. Pleasure in sexual relations (like pleasure in eating or in the performance of other bodily functions) is not forbidden but rather assumed (Proverbs 5:18-19 and Song of Solomon).2. Sexual pleasure is to be regulated by the key principle that one’s sexuality does not exist for himself or for his own pleasure, but for his partner.3. Sexual relations are to be regular and continuous.4. The principle of mutual satisfaction means that each party is to provide the sexual enjoyment which is “due” his or her spouse whenever needed.5. There is to be no sexual bargaining.6. Sexual relationships are equal and reciprocal.

Sexual relations within marriage are holy and good (Hebrews 13:4). 1. Pleasure in sexual relations (like pleasure in eating or in the performance of other bodily functions) is not forbidden but rather assumed (Proverbs 5:18-19 and Song of Solomon). 2. Sexual pleasure is to be regulated by the key principle that one’s sexuality does not exist for himself or for his own pleasure, but for his partner. 3. Sexual relations are to be regular and continuous. 4. The principle of mutual satisfaction means that each party is to provide the sexual enjoyment which is “due” his or her spouse whenever needed. 5. There is to be no sexual bargaining. 6. Sexual relationships are equal and reciprocal (Harry McGee).

Reference:   The Scriptures, Sex, and Satisfaction, P&R Publishing, 1975. Used by Permission.


114.
Sexual intercourse is more than a physical act; it is a symbol of a spiritual relationship and the expression of the complete oneness of two persons in married love… It is…the means by which they are confirmed and nourished in that union. Sexual intercourse is the physical establishment and confirmation of that oneness. The true dignity of sex is in its ability to enhance this personal unity between two persons who have committed themselves to each other in love and marriage. In sexual intercourse the couple becomes joined in an indissoluble unity, called in the Bible “one flesh.”

Sexual intercourse is more than a physical act; it is a symbol of a spiritual relationship and the expression of the complete oneness of two persons in married love… It is...the means by which they are confirmed and nourished in that union. Sexual intercourse is the physical establishment and confirmation of that oneness. The true dignity of sex is in its ability to enhance this personal unity between two persons who have committed themselves to each other in love and marriage. In sexual intercourse the couple becomes joined in an indissoluble unity, called in the Bible “one flesh” (Dwight Small).

Reference:   Design for Christian Marriage, Revell, 1971, p. 46, 96.


115.
The sin which is not too great to be forsaken, is not too great to be forgiven.

The sin which is not too great to be forsaken, is not too great to be forgiven (Thomas Horton).

Reference:   A Puritan Golden Treasury, compiled by I.D.E. Thomas, by permission of Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA. 2000, p. 111.


116.
Our Lord calls us out of the world; while living in it, we are not to be stained by it (James 1:27). We are to be in it but not to love it.

Our Lord calls us out of the world; while living in it, we are not to be stained by it (James 1:27). We are to be in it but not to love it (Duncan Rankin).

Reference:   Restoring Love, Tabletalk, June 2005, p. 55. Used by Permission.


117.
[What has God made known in nature and conscience?] 1. God exists.2. This God created the physical universe.3. This God is loving.4. This God is personal, since love cannot characterize an impersonal deity.5. This God is a moral being.6. We have violated the moral law and thus are guilty.7. We have displeased the morally perfect God who is the source of the moral law.

[What has God made known in nature and conscience?] 1. God exists. 2. This God created the physical universe. 3. This God is loving. 4. This God is personal, since love cannot characterize an impersonal deity. 5. This God is a moral being. 6. We have violated the moral law and thus are guilty. 7. We have displeased the morally perfect God who is the source of the moral law (Ronald Nash).

Reference:   Taken from: What About Those Who Have Never Heard? © 1995, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship/USA. Used with permission of InterVarsity Press, P.O. Box 1400, Downers Grove, IL 60515. www.ivpress.com.


118.
To abide in [Christ] expresses the continual act by which the Christian sets aside everything which he might derive from his own wisdom, strength, merit, to draw all from Christ.

To abide in [Christ] expresses the continual act by which the Christian sets aside everything which he might derive from his own wisdom, strength, merit, to draw all from Christ (Frederic Godek).

Reference:   Commentary of John’s Gospel, 1978, p. 855, Kregel Publications, Grand Rapids, MI. Used by Permission. All Rights Reserved.


119.
Love is not an emotion to which we may give expression now and then, as we feel inclined; it is a duty required of us at all times by God, and the children of God ought surely to obey their Heavenly Father.

Love is not an emotion to which we may give expression now and then, as we feel inclined; it is a duty required of us at all times by God, and the children of God ought surely to obey their Heavenly Father (Alexander Ross).

Reference:   The Epistles of James and John, Eerdmans, 1954, p. 208, Used by Permission, www.eerdmans.com.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Love-Defined
120.
I believe young people are indifferent to the church today, not because the church has required too much of them, but because it has demanded so little.

I believe young people are indifferent to the church today, not because the church has required too much of them, but because it has demanded so little (Mort Crim).


121.
All of our discussions of the style and mechanics of worship must be anchored in a deeply biblical and richly gospel-centered understanding of what worship is. We might be tempted at a worship conference to focus exclusively on the style and mechanics of worship. And these are important! But a larger challenge is to link how we approach the week-in, week-out task of planning and leading worship with our theological understanding of worship. Do our planning and leading habits, mechanics, and techniques enable people to experience worship in the deepest, most profound, most Christ-centered way? Does our work form our congregations in a deeply biblical faith? We need a high-octane theology of worship – and one that is not simply articulated in writing, but enacted in our worship and lived out in our lives.

All of our discussions of the style and mechanics of worship must be anchored in a deeply biblical and richly gospel-centered understanding of what worship is. We might be tempted at a worship conference to focus exclusively on the style and mechanics of worship. And these are important! But a larger challenge is to link how we approach the week-in, week-out task of planning and leading worship with our theological understanding of worship. Do our planning and leading habits, mechanics, and techniques enable people to experience worship in the deepest, most profound, most Christ-centered way? Does our work form our congregations in a deeply biblical faith? We need a high-octane theology of worship - and one that is not simply articulated in writing, but enacted in our worship and lived out in our lives (John Witvliet).

Reference:   Reflections on Worship’s Meaning and Purpose - Thinking About Worship, Calvin Institute of Christian Worship.


122.
What is “resting in God,” but the instinctive movement and upward glance of the spirit to Him; the confiding all one’s griefs and fears to Him, and feeling strengthened, patient, hopeful in the act of doing so! It implies a willingness that He should choose for us, a conviction that the ordering of all that concerns us is safer in His hands than in our own.

What is “resting in God,” but the instinctive movement and upward glance of the spirit to Him; the confiding all one’s griefs and fears to Him, and feeling strengthened, patient, hopeful in the act of doing so! It implies a willingness that He should choose for us, a conviction that the ordering of all that concerns us is safer in His hands than in our own (James Burns).

Reference:   Quoted in the Treasury of David by C.H. Spurgeon, v. 1, p. 184.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Faith-God-in
123.
Trusting God involves the loss of our agenda…so that we die to our inclination to live a lie. It requires forfeiting our rigid, self-protective, God-dishonoring ways of relating in order to embrace life as it is meant to be lived; in humble dependence on God and passionate involvement with others.

Trusting God involves the loss of our agenda...so that we die to our inclination to live a lie. It requires forfeiting our rigid, self-protective, God-dishonoring ways of relating in order to embrace life as it is meant to be lived; in humble dependence on God and passionate involvement with others (Dan Allender).

Reference:   Copied from The Wounded Heart: Hope for Adult Victims of Childhood Sexual Abuse, copyright 1990, p. 174, Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com, All rights reserved.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Faith-God-in
124.
All things (but lying, dying, and denying Himself) are possible to God.

All things (but lying, dying, and denying Himself) are possible to God (Christopher Neese).

Reference:   A Puritan Golden Treasury, compiled by I.D.E. Thomas, by permission of Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA. 2000, p. 119.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: God-Omnipotence
125.
God’s commands instruct us about His attitude toward sin, and tell us what kinds of things He designates as sin, and that He has a provision for sin, typified, and then fulfilled in His Son. If we use the law that way – let it be so. If we use it as a scourge, let us be anathema. It is revelation, not salvation.

God’s commands instruct us about His attitude toward sin, and tell us what kinds of things He designates as sin, and that He has a provision for sin, typified, and then fulfilled in His Son. If we use the law that way – let it be so. If we use it as a scourge, let us be anathema. It is revelation, not salvation (Reid Ferguson).

Reference:   Quoted in: Studies in Galatians by John Reisinger, Sound of Grace, Issue 148, June 2008, p. 17. Used by Permission.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Law-General
126.
To the extent that this kind of preaching uses the Bible at all, it does so to exploit or devour it and not to listen to it, let alone to stand under it and be guided by it… [They] are using the text as its masters rather than serving the text as its ministers.

To the extent that this kind of preaching uses the Bible at all, it does so to exploit or devour it and not to listen to it, let alone to stand under it and be guided by it… [They] are using the text as its masters rather than serving the text as its ministers (Dwight Stevenson).

Reference:   In the Biblical Preacher’s Workshop, Abingdon Press, 1967, p. 196.


127.
Wisdom in ruling is justice; wisdom in speech is discretion; wisdom in conduct is prudence; wisdom in evaluation is discernment.

Wisdom in ruling is justice; wisdom in speech is discretion; wisdom in conduct is prudence; wisdom in evaluation is discernment (George Seevers).

Reference:   Quoted in: Curtis C. Thomas, Practical Wisdom for Pastors, Crossway Books, 2001, p. 210. Used by Permission.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Wisdom-Human
128.
Each of us in the Body of Christ has the ability, because of His love for us, to minister to and bless the Lord. We can bring joy to God just as a loving son or daughter does to their parents, and as a friend to a friend. Worship from the heart is one of the best gifts you can bring to your heavenly Father. When we worship Him, not because of fear or pride or obligation, but out of an overflow of love and gratitude, we bless and minister to God. This is a privilege that He has given to all His sons and daughters. A worship leader is not necessarily more “spiritual” than anyone else; he or she simply is willing to help a group of people reach a place of loving intimacy with God via music.

Each of us in the Body of Christ has the ability, because of His love for us, to minister to and bless the Lord. We can bring joy to God just as a loving son or daughter does to their parents, and as a friend to a friend. Worship from the heart is one of the best gifts you can bring to your heavenly Father. When we worship Him, not because of fear or pride or obligation, but out of an overflow of love and gratitude, we bless and minister to God. This is a privilege that He has given to all His sons and daughters. A worship leader is not necessarily more “spiritual” than anyone else; he or she simply is willing to help a group of people reach a place of loving intimacy with God via music (Don Francisco).

Reference:   Am I Worthy to Minister, Music Ministers Newsletter, Rocky Mountain Ministries.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Worship-Leaders
129.
Jesus consistently tied together self-denial and the cross. The call of God into the Christian life is a call to self-denial. The cross – self-denial – is the path of every Christian. The antithesis of the cross is self-love. Therefore, self-love is classified as a “different gospel” (Gal. 1:6), opposed to the Gospel of Jesus Christ.

Jesus consistently tied together self-denial and the cross. The call of God into the Christian life is a call to self-denial. The cross – self-denial – is the path of every Christian. The antithesis of the cross is self-love. Therefore, self-love is classified as a “different gospel” (Gal. 1:6), opposed to the Gospel of Jesus Christ (David Tyler).

Reference:   The Gospel of Self-Esteem – Are We Really Better than We Think? The Quarterly Journal, v. 24, n. 1.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Self-Love
130.
However abundant the Scriptural data might be regarding the resurrection of believers and their life in heaven, the state of the soul between death and resurrection is rarely referred to in the Bible.

However abundant the Scriptural data might be regarding the resurrection of believers and their life in heaven, the state of the soul between death and resurrection is rarely referred to in the Bible (Wilbur Smith).

Reference:   Wilbur Smith Biblical Doctrine of Heaven, Moody, 1968, p. 155.


131.
Man’s perennial efforts to take himself in hand, however he attempts it, lead to the greatest bondage in which man misses what he was meant to be. Man’s true freedom does not consist of the unfettered power to direct his life, either in a political or in a Stoic sense. It lies in life with God, lived as it was originally intended by God for man. He only gains this as he denies himself. Paradoxically, the free man does not belong to himself. He belongs to Him who has set him free.

Man’s perennial efforts to take himself in hand, however he attempts it, lead to the greatest bondage in which man misses what he was meant to be. Man’s true freedom does not consist of the unfettered power to direct his life, either in a political or in a Stoic sense. It lies in life with God, lived as it was originally intended by God for man. He only gains this as he denies himself. Paradoxically, the free man does not belong to himself. He belongs to Him who has set him free (J. Blunck).

Reference:   The New International Dictionary of New Testament Theology, v. 1, ed. Colin Brown, Zondervan, www.zondervan.com, 1971, p. 718.


132.
Show me a place on the face of the earth ten miles square where a man may provide for his children in decency and comfort, where infancy is protected, where age is venerated, where womanhood is honored, and where human life is held in due regard, and I will show you a place where the gospel of Christ has gone and laid the foundation.

Show me a place on the face of the earth ten miles square where a man may provide for his children in decency and comfort, where infancy is protected, where age is venerated, where womanhood is honored, and where human life is held in due regard, and I will show you a place where the gospel of Christ has gone and laid the foundation (James Lowell).


133.
It is work as free from care and toil and fatigue as is the wing-stroke of the jubilant lark when it soars into the sunlight of a fresh, clear day and, spontaneously and for self-relief, pours out its thrilling carol. Work [in heaven] is a matter of self-relief, as well as a matter of obedience to the ruling will of God. It is work according to one’s tastes and delight and ability. If tastes vary there, if abilities vary there, then occupations will vary there.

It is work as free from care and toil and fatigue as is the wing-stroke of the jubilant lark when it soars into the sunlight of a fresh, clear day and, spontaneously and for self-relief, pours out its thrilling carol. Work [in heaven] is a matter of self-relief, as well as a matter of obedience to the ruling will of God. It is work according to one’s tastes and delight and ability. If tastes vary there, if abilities vary there, then occupations will vary there (David Gregg).

Reference:   The Heaven-Life, Revell, 1895, p. 62.


134.
We are not called to forgive others in order to earn God’s love; rather, having experienced His love, we have the basis and motive to forgive others.

We are not called to forgive others in order to earn God's love; rather, having experienced His love, we have the basis and motive to forgive others (Pat Morison).

Reference:   Forgive! As the Lord Forgave You, P&R Publishing, 1987, p. 7, Used by Permission.


135.
[True forgiveness means] laying down our right to remain angry and giving up our claim to future repayment of the debt we have suffered.

[True forgiveness means] laying down our right to remain angry and giving up our claim to future repayment of the debt we have suffered (Brian Dodd).

Reference:   Taken from Praying Jesus’ Way: A Guide for Beginners and Veterans, © 1997, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship/USA. Used with permission of IVP, P.O. Box 1400, Downers Grove, IL 60515. www.ivpress.com, p. 101.


136.
He who sups with the devil had better have a long spoon. The devilry of modernity has its own magic: The [believer] who sups with it will find his spoon getting shorter and shorter-until that last supper in which he is left alone at the table, with no spoon at all and with an empty plate. The devil, one may guess, will by then have gone away to more interesting company.

He who sups with the devil had better have a long spoon. The devilry of modernity has its own magic: The [believer] who sups with it will find his spoon getting shorter and shorter-until that last supper in which he is left alone at the table, with no spoon at all and with an empty plate. The devil, one may guess, will by then have gone away to more interesting company (Peter Berger).

Reference:   Quoted in: Guinness, Dining with the Devil, Baker, 1993, p. 5.


137.
Many believers are "rabbit hole" Christians. In the morning they pop out of their safe Christian homes, hold their breath at work, scurry home to their families and then off to their Bible studies, and finally end the day praying for the unbelievers they safely avoided all day.

Many believers are "rabbit hole" Christians. In the morning they pop out of their safe Christian homes, hold their breath at work, scurry home to their families and then off to their Bible studies, and finally end the day praying for the unbelievers they safely avoided all day (Jan Johnson).

Reference:   Moody Monthly, Nov. 1987.


138.
In the Being of God there are not three individuals, but only three personal self distinctions within the one Divine Essence.

In the Being of God there are not three individuals, but only three personal self distinctions within the one Divine Essence (R.A. Finlayson).

Reference:   Trinity, The New Bible Dictionary, Eerdmans, p. 1300.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: God-Trinity
139.
Discipling others is the process by which a Christian with a life worth emulating commits himself for an extended period of time to a few individuals who have been won to Christ, the purpose being to aid and guide their growth and maturity, and equip them to reproduce themselves in a third spiritual generation.

Discipling others is the process by which a Christian with a life worth emulating commits himself for an extended period of time to a few individuals who have been won to Christ, the purpose being to aid and guide their growth and maturity, and equip them to reproduce themselves in a third spiritual generation (Allen Hadidian).

Reference:   Successful Discipling, Moody, 1979.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Discipleship
140.
A man pardoned, and justified by faith in Christ, though he may, sometimes doth, fall into foul sins, yet they never prevail so far as to reverse pardon, and reduce to a state of non-justification.

A man pardoned, and justified by faith in Christ, though he may, sometimes doth, fall into foul sins, yet they never prevail so far as to reverse pardon, and reduce to a state of non-justification (William Greenhill).

Reference:   A Puritan Golden Treasury, compiled by I.D.E. Thomas, by permission of Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA. 2000, p. 111.


141.
The broken person…will find that all of the resources of heaven and all of the Spirit’s power are now at his disposal and, unless heaven’s riches can be exhausted or the Spirit’s power can be found wanting, he cannot come up short.

The broken person…will find that all of the resources of heaven and all of the Spirit’s power are now at his disposal and, unless heaven’s riches can be exhausted or the Spirit’s power can be found wanting, he cannot come up short (Jennifer Kennedy Dean).

Reference:   He Restores My Soul: A Forty-Day Journey Toward Personal Renewal, Broadman and Holman, 1999, p. 27.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Brokenness
142.
O good God, guide me by Thy holy hand, that I may keep myself within the lists of Christianity, being modest in apparel, moderate (in) diet, chaste and temperate in speech, sober in fashion and my ordinary deportment, respective to my superiors, amiable to my equals, without pride and insolency towards these that are below me, courteous and affable and yet without vanity and popularity towards all.

O good God, guide me by Thy holy hand, that I may keep myself within the lists of Christianity, being modest in apparel, moderate (in) diet, chaste and temperate in speech, sober in fashion and my ordinary deportment, respective to my superiors, amiable to my equals, without pride and insolency towards these that are below me, courteous and affable and yet without vanity and popularity towards all (Samuel Hieron).

Reference:   A Puritan Golden Treasury, compiled by I.D.E. Thomas, by permission of Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA. 2000, p. 207


143.
By Sabbath…we are to understand the Lord Jesus only, Who Alone is the Sabbath or Rest of Believers under the Gospel. And to keep this Sabbath from polluting it, is to believe in Him only unto righteousness. For to do any work, I mean to seek righteousness, or peace, or reconciliation with God by any work, is to pollute this Sabbath or this Rest; by Whom Alone, such as believe in Him, do and shall enjoy a glorious, an everlasting rest.

By Sabbath…we are to understand the Lord Jesus only, Who Alone is the Sabbath or Rest of Believers under the Gospel. And to keep this Sabbath from polluting it, is to believe in Him only unto righteousness. For to do any work, I mean to seek righteousness, or peace, or reconciliation with God by any work, is to pollute this Sabbath or this Rest; by Whom Alone, such as believe in Him, do and shall enjoy a glorious, an everlasting rest (Robert Garner).

Reference:   A Treatise on Baptism, The Old Faith Baptist Church, 1645, p. 30.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Sabbath
144.
The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power and all that beauty and all that wealth e’er gave await alike the inevitable hour. The paths of glory lead but to the grave.

The boast of heraldry, the pomp of power and all that beauty and all that wealth e'er gave await alike the inevitable hour. The paths of glory lead but to the grave (Thomas Gray).


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Death-Certainty
145.
If your body makes all the decisions and gives all the orders, and if you obey, the physical can effectively destroy every other dimension of your personality. Your emotional life will be blunted and your spiritual life will be stifled and ultimately will become anemic.

If your body makes all the decisions and gives all the orders, and if you obey, the physical can effectively destroy every other dimension of your personality. Your emotional life will be blunted and your spiritual life will be stifled and ultimately will become anemic (Michael Quoist).

Reference:   The Christian Response, Gill and Macmillan, 1965, p. 4.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Body
146.
There’s no gridlock with God…no stalemate…no tie game. If a husband and wife have talked things out, but cannot come to agreement on a matter, the Bible teaches that the husband’s authority prevails. By divine design God has entrusted to the husband leadership and authority with which to wisely and lovingly rule the household. The husband is not guaranteed the smartest decisions–but God does expect him to exercise leadership in the home and to have the power to veto (break up an impasse with his vote).  However, this does not give him the right to be arrogant and to flaunt his authority, or to run roughshod over other family members’ feelings. He has no right to refuse to listen to his wife, to withdraw from confrontational discussions, to act in anger, or to act in a non-understanding way (1 Peter 3:7). He has no right to exasperate his children or anyone else in the family. He must love his wife even as Christ loves the church and gave Himself up for it.  Because of the Biblical doctrine of ‘male headship,’ I place (and I believe God places) the brunt of the responsibility for family growth, happiness, and harmony, upon the husband. Since he is the one entrusted with leadership, he is the one chiefly responsible for leading the family towards the goal of Christlikeness.

There's no gridlock with God…no stalemate…no tie game. If a husband and wife have talked things out, but cannot come to agreement on a matter, the Bible teaches that the husband's authority prevails. By divine design God has entrusted to the husband leadership and authority with which to wisely and lovingly rule the household. The husband is not guaranteed the smartest decisions--but God does expect him to exercise leadership in the home and to have the power to veto (break up an impasse with his vote). However, this does not give him the right to be arrogant and to flaunt his authority, or to run roughshod over other family members' feelings. He has no right to refuse to listen to his wife, to withdraw from confrontational discussions, to act in anger, or to act in a non-understanding way (1 Peter 3:7). He has no right to exasperate his children or anyone else in the family. He must love his wife even as Christ loves the church and gave Himself up for it. Because of the Biblical doctrine of 'male headship,' I place (and I believe God places) the brunt of the responsibility for family growth, happiness, and harmony, upon the husband. Since he is the one entrusted with leadership, he is the one chiefly responsible for leading the family towards the goal of Christlikeness (Peter Wise).


147.
One must persevere in faith to be saved. True believers cannot lose their faith, since it’s God’s gift. Those dying without faith in Christ are condemned. Those who “lose” their faith never had it to begin with. God will preserve true believers and they will be saved.

One must persevere in faith to be saved. True believers cannot lose their faith, since it’s God’s gift. Those dying without faith in Christ are condemned. Those who “lose” their faith never had it to begin with. God will preserve true believers and they will be saved (Greg Johnson).


148.
The greatest hindrances to the evangelization of the world are those within the church.

The greatest hindrances to the evangelization of the world are those within the church (John Mott).


149.
Love is the root of missions; sacrifice is the fruit of missions.

Love is the root of missions; sacrifice is the fruit of missions (Roderick Davis).


150.
It belongs to the very idea and nature of man to be in communion with God. It was once said to a useful minister, “Sir, if you did not plough in your closet, you would not reap in your pulpit.”

It belongs to the very idea and nature of man to be in communion with God. It was once said to a useful minister, “Sir, if you did not plough in your closet, you would not reap in your pulpit” (Samuel Prime).

Reference:   The Power of Prayer, p. 248.


151.
I have never known a pastor to be fired for prayerlessness, even though I expect that many justly could have been (myself included). There are at least three reasons for this. First, congregations rarely hold a pastor accountable for his devotional life. Second, pastors themselves too infrequently seek such accountability. Third, pastors can conceal the neglect of private duties more easily than the neglect of public duties. But what does such private neglect reveal? That a pastor fears man more than he fears God.

I have never known a pastor to be fired for prayerlessness, even though I expect that many justly could have been (myself included). There are at least three reasons for this. First, congregations rarely hold a pastor accountable for his devotional life. Second, pastors themselves too infrequently seek such accountability. Third, pastors can conceal the neglect of private duties more easily than the neglect of public duties. But what does such private neglect reveal? That a pastor fears man more than he fears God (Mike Smith).

Reference:   The Devotional Life of the Professional Christian, © 9Marks. Website: www.9Marks.org. Email: [email protected] Toll Free: (888) 543-1030. Used by Permission.


152.
Take note that when men oppress and persecute most unjustly, yet there is cause to justify God in suffering it to be so.  God’s justice is executed upon us by their injustice; if men falsely accuse us, yet God can truly charge us.  When Job has to deal with men, he maintains his integrity against their accusations, Job 27:4-6, but when he has to deal with God, he acknowledges his sin, and will not stand upon his own justification; he will not plead but supplicate.

Take note that when men oppress and persecute most unjustly, yet there is cause to justify God in suffering it to be so.  God’s justice is executed upon us by their injustice; if men falsely accuse us, yet God can truly charge us.  When Job has to deal with men, he maintains his integrity against their accusations, Job 27:4-6, but when he has to deal with God, he acknowledges his sin, and will not stand upon his own justification; he will not plead but supplicate (John Oldfield).

Reference:   A Puritan Golden Treasury, compiled by I.D.E. Thomas, by permission of Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA. 2000, p. 14.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: God-Justice
153.
Inclusivism holds that although Christianity is the true religion and Jesus the only way to salvation, more people are saved through Christ than the church traditionally has thought. Accordingly, God forgives followers of the world’s religions on the basis of their response to the revelation they have. If those who have never heard the gospel respond in faith, God will save them on the basis of Christ’s saving work. “In other words, people can receive the gift of salvation without knowing the Giver or the precise nature of the gift.

Inclusivism holds that although Christianity is the true religion and Jesus the only way to salvation, more people are saved through Christ than the church traditionally has thought. Accordingly, God forgives followers of the world’s religions on the basis of their response to the revelation they have. If those who have never heard the gospel respond in faith, God will save them on the basis of Christ’s saving work. “In other words, people can receive the gift of salvation without knowing the Giver or the precise nature of the gift (John Sanders).

Reference:   No Other Name: An Investigation into the Destiny of the Unevangelized, Eerdmans, www.eerdmans.com, 1992, p. 215.


154.
The supreme test for them really is whether they have found the hour in church enjoyable, whether the music being good, the singing hearty, the decorations no offense to the eye, the curtains the right shade, the building beautiful, they come away "feeling" better. The sense that truth, saving truth, the truth that liberates, is at once infinitely valuable and infinitely difficult to come by is almost completely absent.

The supreme test for them really is whether they have found the hour in church enjoyable, whether the music being good, the singing hearty, the decorations no offense to the eye, the curtains the right shade, the building beautiful, they come away "feeling" better. The sense that truth, saving truth, the truth that liberates, is at once infinitely valuable and infinitely difficult to come by is almost completely absent (Herbert Farmer).


155.
The greatest missionary is the Bible in the mother tongue. It needs no furlough and is never considered a foreigner.

The greatest missionary is the Bible in the mother tongue. It needs no furlough and is never considered a foreigner (William Townsend).


156.
Character is the one thing we make in this world and take with us into the next. The circumstances amid which you live determine your reputation; the truth you believe determines your character. Reputation is what you are supposed to be; Character is what you are. Reputation is what you have when you come to a new community; Character is what you have when you go away. Reputation is made in a moment; Character is built in a lifetime. Reputation grows like a mushroom; Character grows like an oak. Your reputation is learned in an hour; Your character is does not come to light for a year. A single newspaper report gives your reputation; a life of toil gives you your character. Reputation makes you rich or makes you poor; Character makes you happy or makes you miserable. Reputation is what men say about you on your tombstone; Character is what angels say about you before the throne of God. Your character is what God knows you to be. Your reputation is what men think you are.

Character is the one thing we make in this world and take with us into the next. The circumstances amid which you live determine your reputation; the truth you believe determines your character. Reputation is what you are supposed to be; Character is what you are. Reputation is what you have when you come to a new community; Character is what you have when you go away. Reputation is made in a moment; Character is built in a lifetime. Reputation grows like a mushroom; Character grows like an oak. Your reputation is learned in an hour; Your character is does not come to light for a year. A single newspaper report gives your reputation; a life of toil gives you your character. Reputation makes you rich or makes you poor; Character makes you happy or makes you miserable. Reputation is what men say about you on your tombstone; Character is what angels say about you before the throne of God. Your character is what God knows you to be. Your reputation is what men think you are (William Davis).


157.
Preaching must pump his heart until he lives and breathes the message. The message will hound him, drive him, even explode within him. So great will be the desire to preach that he will find it difficult to wait for the next time to deliver the message of God.

Preaching must pump his heart until he lives and breathes the message. The message will hound him, drive him, even explode within him. So great will be the desire to preach that he will find it difficult to wait for the next time to deliver the message of God (Michael Tucker).

Reference:   Quoted in: Erwin Lutzer, Pastor to Pastor, Kregel, 1998, p. 33.


158.
How can Christian pastors hope to feed their flock on a well-balanced spiritual diet if they completely neglect the 39 books of Holy Scripture on which Christ and all the New Testament authors received their own spiritual nourishment?

How can Christian pastors hope to feed their flock on a well-balanced spiritual diet if they completely neglect the 39 books of Holy Scripture on which Christ and all the New Testament authors received their own spiritual nourishment (Gleason Archer)?

Reference:   A New Look at the Old Testament, Decision, August 1972, p. 5.


159.
A Trojan horse full of dangerous psycho-fantasies has been professionally prepared for us by Christian psychiatrists and psychologists… At base, such therapies stand upon dogma, not scientific observations, and the dogma is the odious one of Freud and his followers who were some of the century’s most anti-Christ teachers. No amount of well- intentioned refinement of deadly doctrines will make them clean for use by Christians. Though gems are usually found in coal mines, Christians who go fossicking for gems of God’s truth in psychoanalytic coal mines will usually emerge empty-handed and filthy… Christians of discernment should avoid the dangerous system completely.

A Trojan horse full of dangerous psycho-fantasies has been professionally prepared for us by Christian psychiatrists and psychologists… At base, such therapies stand upon dogma, not scientific observations, and the dogma is the odious one of Freud and his followers who were some of the century's most anti-Christ teachers. No amount of well- intentioned refinement of deadly doctrines will make them clean for use by Christians. Though gems are usually found in coal mines, Christians who go fossicking for gems of God's truth in psychoanalytic coal mines will usually emerge empty-handed and filthy… Christians of discernment should avoid the dangerous system completely (Hilton Terrell).


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Psychology
160.
While researching the biblical principles of giving, I considered the subject of worship. Frankly, I had never before studied worship in detail to find out God’s point of view. I have come to the conclusion that giving, along with our thanksgiving and praise, is worship. In the past I made pledges to my church to be paid on a yearly basis. Once a month, I would write a check while in church and drop it in the collection plate. Sometimes I would mail a check from my office. My objective was for the church to get the total pledge before the end of the year. Though I had already experienced the joy of giving, the act of making my gift had little relationship to worship. While I was writing this book God convicted me to begin giving every time I went to church. The verse that spoke to me about this Deuteronomy 16:16: “Do not appear before Me empty-handed.” When I started doing this, if a check were not handy, I gave cash. At first I thought about keeping up with the money given. Then God convicted me again. He seemed to say, “You do not need to keep up with the amount of cash. Give to Me simply out of a heart of love, and see how much you enjoy the service.” I made this change in giving habits, and it has greatly enhanced my joy in our worship services.

While researching the biblical principles of giving, I considered the subject of worship. Frankly, I had never before studied worship in detail to find out God’s point of view. I have come to the conclusion that giving, along with our thanksgiving and praise, is worship. In the past I made pledges to my church to be paid on a yearly basis. Once a month, I would write a check while in church and drop it in the collection plate. Sometimes I would mail a check from my office. My objective was for the church to get the total pledge before the end of the year. Though I had already experienced the joy of giving, the act of making my gift had little relationship to worship. While I was writing this book God convicted me to begin giving every time I went to church. The verse that spoke to me about this Deuteronomy 16:16: “Do not appear before Me empty-handed.” When I started doing this, if a check were not handy, I gave cash. At first I thought about keeping up with the money given. Then God convicted me again. He seemed to say, “You do not need to keep up with the amount of cash. Give to Me simply out of a heart of love, and see how much you enjoy the service.” I made this change in giving habits, and it has greatly enhanced my joy in our worship services (Wayne Watts).

Reference:   The Gift of Giving, NavPress, 1982, p. 35-36.


161.
The badge of courage does not require that we walk through something dangerous. It simply requires that we continue to share God’s love whenever and wherever we are.

The badge of courage does not require that we walk through something dangerous. It simply requires that we continue to share God's love whenever and wherever we are (Tom White).

Reference:   Voice of the Martyrs.


162.
Afraid? Of what? To feel the spirit’s glad release? To pass from pain to perfect peace. The strife and strain of life to cease? Afraid – of that?

Afraid? Of what? To feel the spirit's glad release? To pass from pain to perfect peace. The strife and strain of life to cease? Afraid – of that (E.H. Hamilton)?


163.
Christian! Death cannot hurt you! Death is your best friend – who is commissioned by Christ to summon you from the world of vanity and woe, and from a body of sin and death – to the blissful regions of glory and immortality, to meet your Lord, and to be forever with Him!

Christian! Death cannot hurt you! Death is your best friend – who is commissioned by Christ to summon you from the world of vanity and woe, and from a body of sin and death – to the blissful regions of glory and immortality, to meet your Lord, and to be forever with Him (William Mason)!

Reference:   The One Thing Needful to Make Poor Sinners Rich and Miserable Sinners Happy.


164.
George Muller observed, “The great fault of the children of God is, they do not continue in prayer; they do not go on praying; they do not persevere. If they desire anything for God’s glory, they should pray until they get it.”

George Muller observed, “The great fault of the children of God is, they do not continue in prayer; they do not go on praying; they do not persevere. If they desire anything for God’s glory, they should pray until they get it” (Roger Steer).

Reference:   George Muller: Delighted in God! Harold Shaw, 1975, p. 310


165.
Christianity is a battle – not a dream.

Christianity is a battle – not a dream (Wendell Phillips).


166.
Jonathan Edwards’s own analysis of the revivals: the Word is the occasion for awakening, and a necessary one, but the Spirit of God does the work, and he “blows where he wills.” His passing could be seen in lasting changes: People made humble, faithful, prayerful, holy. Churches made earnest in worship and hungry for the Word. Towns where, to quote Charles Simeon, a century later, “goodness” became “fashionable.”

Jonathan Edwards's own analysis of the revivals: the Word is the occasion for awakening, and a necessary one, but the Spirit of God does the work, and he “blows where he wills.” His passing could be seen in lasting changes: People made humble, faithful, prayerful, holy. Churches made earnest in worship and hungry for the Word. Towns where, to quote Charles Simeon, a century later, “goodness” became “fashionable” (Stephen Holmes).

Reference:   A Mind on Fire, Christian History, Issue 77, p. 13.


167.
When a True Christian sins, what happens?1. His Fellowship with God is severed. David, when backslidden, mourned, “Day and night thy hand was heavy upon me: my moisture is turned into the drought of summer” (Psalm 32:4). As clouds hide the sun for days, so sin comes between the soul and God.2. The Joy of salvation is lost. One loses all relish for spiritual things: the heart is empty. David, in this condition, confessed, “My sin is ever before me” and “Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation; and uphold me with thy free Spirit” (Psalm 51:3, 12).3. Power for service is lost. The Holy Spirit’s power is essential for any real witness for Christ. It cannot be faked. David prayed, “Thou desirest truth in the inward parts” and “Create in me a clean heart, O God; and renew a right spirit within me” (Psalm 51:6, 10).4. The Christian invites divine chastisement. Hebrews 12:6-7 – “Whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, and scourgeth every son whom he receiveth…What son is he whom the father chasteneth not?” Psalm 89:32-33 – “I will visit their transgression with the rod, and their iniquity with stripes. Nevertheless, my lovingkindness will I not utterly take from him, nor suffer my faithfulness to fail.”5. There is loss of reward. (Read 1 Corinthians 3:11-15.) Out of Fellowship means out of Service – out of service means that one is failing to lay up treasures in heaven. He is building of “wood, hay, and stubble” which cannot endure the test of the rewarding day (1 Corinthians 3:12-15). Many will be chagrined in that day by suffering Loss of Reward.  Take the Way Back Now. Psalm 32:5; 1 John 1:9.

When a True Christian sins, what happens? 1. His Fellowship with God is severed. David, when backslidden, mourned, “Day and night thy hand was heavy upon me: my moisture is turned into the drought of summer” (Psalm 32:4). As clouds hide the sun for days, so sin comes between the soul and God. 2. The Joy of salvation is lost. One loses all relish for spiritual things: the heart is empty. David, in this condition, confessed, “My sin is ever before me” and “Restore unto me the joy of thy salvation; and uphold me with thy free Spirit” (Psalm 51:3, 12). 3. Power for service is lost. The Holy Spirit’s power is essential for any real witness for Christ. It cannot be faked. David prayed, “Thou desirest truth in the inward parts” and “Create in me a clean heart, O God; and renew a right spirit within me” (Psalm 51:6, 10). 4. The Christian invites divine chastisement. Hebrews 12:6-7 – “Whom the Lord loveth he chasteneth, and scourgeth every son whom he receiveth…What son is he whom the father chasteneth not?” Psalm 89:32-33 – “I will visit their transgression with the rod, and their iniquity with stripes. Nevertheless, my lovingkindness will I not utterly take from him, nor suffer my faithfulness to fail.” 5. There is loss of reward. (Read 1 Corinthians 3:11-15.) Out of Fellowship means out of Service – out of service means that one is failing to lay up treasures in heaven. He is building of “wood, hay, and stubble” which cannot endure the test of the rewarding day (1 Corinthians 3:12-15). Many will be chagrined in that day by suffering Loss of Reward. Take the Way Back Now. Psalm 32:5; 1 John 1:9 (Keith Brooks).

Reference:   Essential Themes, Moody Press, 1974, p. 48-49.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Sin-Result
168.
The real power of pornography is that it provides men with the ultimate fantasy fulfillment without the risk of emotional rejection that often accompanies relationship with “real” women. In normal sexual relations, our fragile male egos are on the line, and often the slightest rejection of our advances can drive us quickly into seclusion, brooding, and hurt. Pornography solves the problem. There exists a seemingly unceasing supply of super attractive, inviting women, always available, always willing – and who give the impression that each reader (viewer) is very special. Pornographic literature plays with our minds at the deepest levels.

The real power of pornography is that it provides men with the ultimate fantasy fulfillment without the risk of emotional rejection that often accompanies relationship with “real” women. In normal sexual relations, our fragile male egos are on the line, and often the slightest rejection of our advances can drive us quickly into seclusion, brooding, and hurt. Pornography solves the problem. There exists a seemingly unceasing supply of super attractive, inviting women, always available, always willing – and who give the impression that each reader (viewer) is very special. Pornographic literature plays with our minds at the deepest levels (Robert Hicks).

Reference:   Copied from Masculine Journey by Robert Hicks © 1993, p. 65-66. Used by Permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Pornography
169.
In short, pornography and all forms of sexual sin rob men of the godly leadership they are called to provide in the lives of those closest to them; it robs men of confidence in the truths of Scripture and their enthusiasm for things of God; and finally, it undermines the place of God as the supreme Being whom they are called to worship and serve – and replaces Him with a more manageable and predictable object of adoration.

In short, pornography and all forms of sexual sin rob men of the godly leadership they are called to provide in the lives of those closest to them; it robs men of confidence in the truths of Scripture and their enthusiasm for things of God; and finally, it undermines the place of God as the supreme Being whom they are called to worship and serve – and replaces Him with a more manageable and predictable object of adoration (John Freeman).

Reference:   Godly Living in a Sexually Immoral Culture, Tabletalk, June 2005, p. 17-18. Used by Permission.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Pornography
170.
God’s purpose is to glorify Himself through His church. He is glorified as the church is true to Him and His Word, as the church mirrors His purity and holiness. Failure to keep the church pure brings discredit to God on this earth and brings to His name great shame in the failure of those who profess to know Him.

God's purpose is to glorify Himself through His church. He is glorified as the church is true to Him and His Word, as the church mirrors His purity and holiness. Failure to keep the church pure brings discredit to God on this earth and brings to His name great shame in the failure of those who profess to know Him (Richard Belcher).


171.
The typical church is an activity trap. Having lost sight of the higher purposes for which it was originated, it now attempts to make up for this loss by an increased range of activities.

The typical church is an activity trap. Having lost sight of the higher purposes for which it was originated, it now attempts to make up for this loss by an increased range of activities (George Odiorne).

Reference:   Quoted in: Dann Spader, Growing a Healthy Church, Moody, 1991, p. 9.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Church-Purpose
172.
I would like to buy three dollars worth of God, please. Not enough to explode my soul or disturb my sleep, but just enough of Him to equal a cup of warm milk or a snooze in the sunshine. I don’t want enough of Him to make me love a black man or pick beets with a migrant. I want ecstasy, not transformation. I want the warmth of the womb, not a new birth. I want a pound of the Eternal in a paper sack, please. I would like to buy three dollars worth of God, please.

I would like to buy three dollars worth of God, please. Not enough to explode my soul or disturb my sleep, but just enough of Him to equal a cup of warm milk or a snooze in the sunshine. I don't want enough of Him to make me love a black man or pick beets with a migrant. I want ecstasy, not transformation. I want the warmth of the womb, not a new birth. I want a pound of the Eternal in a paper sack, please. I would like to buy three dollars worth of God, please (Wilbur Reese).


173.
[Mothers], our daughters will be products of their theology. Their knowledge – or lack of knowledge – of who God is and what He has done for them will show up in every attitude, action, and relationship. Their worldview will be determined by their belief system. We must teach our daughters that their value and identity lie in the fact that they are image-bearers of the God of glory. This will protect them from seeking significance in the inconsequential shallowness of self-fulfillment, personal happiness, materialism, or others’ approval. Our daughters must know the wondrous truth that their overarching purpose in life is God’s glory.

[Mothers], our daughters will be products of their theology. Their knowledge – or lack of knowledge – of who God is and what He has done for them will show up in every attitude, action, and relationship. Their worldview will be determined by their belief system. We must teach our daughters that their value and identity lie in the fact that they are image-bearers of the God of glory. This will protect them from seeking significance in the inconsequential shallowness of self-fulfillment, personal happiness, materialism, or others’ approval. Our daughters must know the wondrous truth that their overarching purpose in life is God’s glory (Susan Hunt).

Reference:   Taken from: Biblical Womanhood in the Home by Nancy Leigh DeMoss, Crossway, 2002, p. 150.


174.
While we do not get a better Christ in the sacraments than in the Word, sometimes we get Christ better.

While we do not get a better Christ in the sacraments than in the Word, sometimes we get Christ better (Robert Bruce).


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Sacraments
175.
Everywhere he stepped Scotland shook.  Whenever he opened his mouth a spiritual force swept in every direction.  Thousands followed him to the feet of Christ.

Everywhere he stepped Scotland shook.  Whenever he opened his mouth a spiritual force swept in every direction.  Thousands followed him to the feet of Christ (Courtland Meyers).

Reference:   Quoted in: John MacArthur, 1 Corinthians, 1985, p. 120


176.
Unless the pulpit is the place where you are the humblest in giving God’s message, it is certain to be the place where you are vainest in giving your own.

Unless the pulpit is the place where you are the humblest in giving God’s message, it is certain to be the place where you are vainest in giving your own (John Oman).

Reference:   Concerning the Ministry, Harper, 1937, p. 44.


177.
The devil is not impersonal like stones or bureaucracies; he is a non-person. The Devil has become all that God is not; he is not beyond personality – he is without it. His purpose in creation is not to destroy God; he knows that he cannot do that. He wants to draw us into the vortex of non-personhood that he has become, and the nothingness of non-being that he is becoming. Satan, in short, aims to take as many of us with him as he can.

The devil is not impersonal like stones or bureaucracies; he is a non-person. The Devil has become all that God is not; he is not beyond personality – he is without it. His purpose in creation is not to destroy God; he knows that he cannot do that. He wants to draw us into the vortex of non-personhood that he has become, and the nothingness of non-being that he is becoming. Satan, in short, aims to take as many of us with him as he can (Nigel Wright).

Reference:   The Satan Syndrome, Zondervan, 1990, p. 163.


178.
If you sow in prayerlessness, you will reap powerlessness, peacelessness, joylessness, fruitlessness and backsliddenness.

If you sow in prayerlessness, you will reap powerlessness, peacelessness, joylessness, fruitlessness and backsliddenness (Raymond Kwong).


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Prayer-Priority
179.
Who can describe the miseries of a lost soul, when the door of the bottomless pit has closed upon it forever?

Who can describe the miseries of a lost soul, when the door of the bottomless pit has closed upon it forever (David Harsha)?


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Hell-Horrors
180.
Is the fire spoken of literal fire? It is an accepted law of language that a figure of speech is less intense than the reality. If “fire” is merely a figurative expression, it must stand for some great reality, and if the reality is more intense than the figure, what an awful thing the punishment symbolized by fire must be.

Is the fire spoken of literal fire? It is an accepted law of language that a figure of speech is less intense than the reality. If “fire” is merely a figurative expression, it must stand for some great reality, and if the reality is more intense than the figure, what an awful thing the punishment symbolized by fire must be (William Evans).

Reference:   The Great Doctrines of the Bible, Moody, p. 262.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Hell-Horrors
181.
As long as there are millions destitute of the Word of God and knowledge of Jesus Christ, it will be impossible for me to devote time and energy to those who have both.

As long as there are millions destitute of the Word of God and knowledge of Jesus Christ, it will be impossible for me to devote time and energy to those who have both (John Ewen).


182.
We face a humanity that is too precious to neglect. We know a remedy for the ills of the world too wonderful to withhold. We have a Christ too glorious to hide. We have an adventure that is too thrilling to miss.

We face a humanity that is too precious to neglect. We know a remedy for the ills of the world too wonderful to withhold. We have a Christ too glorious to hide. We have an adventure that is too thrilling to miss (Theodore Williams).


183.
Here in His holy House of Prayer we may come on our day of rest, and be safe, if we will, from any thoughts but those of the world to come. Here we gather together for no earthly business, but for a purpose of one sort only; and that purpose is the same for which saints and angels are met together in that innumerable company before the throne of God. If there is a place on earth which, however faintly and dimly, shadows out the courts of God on high, surely it is where His people are met together, in all their weakness and ignorance and sin, in their poor and low estate, yet with humble and faithful hearts, in His House of Prayer.

Here in His holy House of Prayer we may come on our day of rest, and be safe, if we will, from any thoughts but those of the world to come. Here we gather together for no earthly business, but for a purpose of one sort only; and that purpose is the same for which saints and angels are met together in that innumerable company before the throne of God. If there is a place on earth which, however faintly and dimly, shadows out the courts of God on high, surely it is where His people are met together, in all their weakness and ignorance and sin, in their poor and low estate, yet with humble and faithful hearts, in His House of Prayer (Richard Church).

Reference:   Village Sermons, 1897.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Prayer-Meetings
184.
No amount of good talking can make a good prayer-meeting. The impression prevails in some quarters that little homilies, pious exhortations, interesting anecdotes with a religious bearing, and well-selected quotations from popular religious writers are of equal value with prayer in a prayer-meeting. This cannot be true. In the former case we are talking among ourselves. It may be very edifying and helpful; but in the latter instance we are doing business directly with God. An ounce of believing prayer is worth a ton of edifying talk, if the Scriptures are good authority. To be sure, no prayer-meeting leader should object to a personal testimony, or to any contribution calculated to edify, but at the same time there is great need, in the average prayer-meeting, of developing the volume of prayer.

No amount of good talking can make a good prayer-meeting. The impression prevails in some quarters that little homilies, pious exhortations, interesting anecdotes with a religious bearing, and well-selected quotations from popular religious writers are of equal value with prayer in a prayer-meeting. This cannot be true. In the former case we are talking among ourselves. It may be very edifying and helpful; but in the latter instance we are doing business directly with God. An ounce of believing prayer is worth a ton of edifying talk, if the Scriptures are good authority. To be sure, no prayer-meeting leader should object to a personal testimony, or to any contribution calculated to edify, but at the same time there is great need, in the average prayer-meeting, of developing the volume of prayer (J.F, Cowan).

Reference:   More Prayer in the Prayer Meeting, New York, 1906.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Prayer-Meetings
185.
Neither Paul nor any other New Testament writer envisions any Christian couple voluntarily remaining childless for the duration of marriage.

Neither Paul nor any other New Testament writer envisions any Christian couple voluntarily remaining childless for the duration of marriage (John Davis).

Reference:   Evangelical Ethics, P&R, 2004, p. 40.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Birth_Control
186.
How would you answer a person who says, “You can’t take the Bible literally because it promotes killing homosexuals” (Lev 20:13)?1. This particular law was only given to ancient Israel under the terms of the Old Covenant. But God is not relating to anyone under the terms of this covenant today. Rather, God is now relating to all men under the terms of the New Covenant (Hebrews 8). Hence, this is not a law which should be implemented today.2. This passage does not promote killing homosexuals. This is simply false – and it is important to say so. This particular law requires that those who engage in homosexual activity be put to death. Even under the Old Covenant, a person with homosexual inclinations or attractions, who refused to act on them, would NOT be put to death. What is at issue here is homosexual activity – not homosexual attraction.3. God takes sin very seriously and His holiness and moral perfection require that He deal with it as it deserves. Under the terms of the Old Covenant, homosexual behavior was not unique in meriting the sentence of death. Adultery (Lev. 20:10), blasphemy (Lev. 24:16), murder (Exod. 21:12), striking one’s father or mother (Exod. 21:15), kidnapping (Exod. 21:16), cursing one’s father or mother (Exod. 21:17), and other acts as well, all merited the death sentence under the Old Covenant. Even Sabbath violations received the death sentence (Exod. 31:14).4. God disapproves of all sexual sin – not just homosexual activity. God disapproves of adultery, fornication, rape, incest, bestiality, as well as homosexual sin. Again, homosexual sin is not unique in being prohibited by God. All sexual sin is prohibited. The Bible allows for sexual activity only within the confines of one man/one woman heterosexual marriage. Any kind of sexual activity outside of this is sin.

How would you answer a person who says, “You can’t take the Bible literally because it promotes killing homosexuals” (Lev 20:13)? 1. This particular law was only given to ancient Israel under the terms of the Old Covenant. But God is not relating to anyone under the terms of this covenant today. Rather, God is now relating to all men under the terms of the New Covenant (Hebrews 8). Hence, this is not a law which should be implemented today. 2. This passage does not promote killing homosexuals. This is simply false – and it is important to say so. This particular law requires that those who engage in homosexual activity be put to death. Even under the Old Covenant, a person with homosexual inclinations or attractions, who refused to act on them, would NOT be put to death. What is at issue here is homosexual activity – not homosexual attraction. 3. God takes sin very seriously and His holiness and moral perfection require that He deal with it as it deserves. Under the terms of the Old Covenant, homosexual behavior was not unique in meriting the sentence of death. Adultery (Lev. 20:10), blasphemy (Lev. 24:16), murder (Exod. 21:12), striking one’s father or mother (Exod. 21:15), kidnapping (Exod. 21:16), cursing one’s father or mother (Exod. 21:17), and other acts as well, all merited the death sentence under the Old Covenant. Even Sabbath violations received the death sentence (Exod. 31:14). 4. God disapproves of all sexual sin – not just homosexual activity. God disapproves of adultery, fornication, rape, incest, bestiality, as well as homosexual sin. Again, homosexual sin is not unique in being prohibited by God. All sexual sin is prohibited. The Bible allows for sexual activity only within the confines of one man/one woman heterosexual marriage. Any kind of sexual activity outside of this is sin (Michael Gleghorn).

Reference:   Excerpted from: How Do You Answer a Person Who Says You Can't Take the Bible Literally Because It Promotes Killing Homosexuals? Probe Ministries, 2012, www.probe.org.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Homosexuality
187.
The central issue about the Bible is whether we live it.

The central issue about the Bible is whether we live it (John Alexander).


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Bible-Purpose
188.
By expository preaching, I mean that method of pulpit discourse which consists in the consecutive interpretation, and practical enforcement, of a book of sacred canon.

By expository preaching, I mean that method of pulpit discourse which consists in the consecutive interpretation, and practical enforcement, of a book of sacred canon (William Taylor).

Reference:   The Ministry of the Word, Baker Books, 1975, p. 155.


189.
At an early hour in the morning the family was assembled and a portion of Scripture was read from the Old Testament, which was followed by a hymn and a prayer, in which thanks were offered up to the Almighty for preserving them during the silent watches of the night, and for His goodness in permitting them to meet in health of body and soundness of mind; and, at the same time, His grace was implored to defend them amid the dangers and temptations of the day – to make them faithful to every duty, and enable them, in all respects, to walk worthy of their Christian vocation… In the evening, before retiring to rest, the family again assembled, the same form of worship was observed as in the morning, with this difference, that the service was considerably protracted beyond the period which could be conveniently allotted to it in the commencement of the day.

At an early hour in the morning the family was assembled and a portion of Scripture was read from the Old Testament, which was followed by a hymn and a prayer, in which thanks were offered up to the Almighty for preserving them during the silent watches of the night, and for His goodness in permitting them to meet in health of body and soundness of mind; and, at the same time, His grace was implored to defend them amid the dangers and temptations of the day – to make them faithful to every duty, and enable them, in all respects, to walk worthy of their Christian vocation… In the evening, before retiring to rest, the family again assembled, the same form of worship was observed as in the morning, with this difference, that the service was considerably protracted beyond the period which could be conveniently allotted to it in the commencement of the day (Lyman Coleman).

Reference:   The Antiquities of the Christian Church, Gould, Newman & Saxton, 1841, p. 376-377.  


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Worship-Family
190.
What the preacher is in the pulpit, the same the Christian householder is in his house.

What the preacher is in the pulpit, the same the Christian householder is in his house (Lewis Bayly).


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Worship-Family
191.
I find afflictions to be good for me. I have always found them so. Afflictions are happy means in the hands of the Holy Spirit to subdue my corruptions, my pride, my evil passions, my inordinate love to the creature.  Afflictions soften my hard heart, bring me to my knees, increase faith, increase love, increase humility, increase self-denial. Afflictions make me poor in spirit, and nothing in my own eyes.

I find afflictions to be good for me. I have always found them so. Afflictions are happy means in the hands of the Holy Spirit to subdue my corruptions, my pride, my evil passions, my inordinate love to the creature.  Afflictions soften my hard heart, bring me to my knees, increase faith, increase love, increase humility, increase self-denial. Afflictions make me poor in spirit, and nothing in my own eyes.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Affliction
192.
Delays be dangerous, our hearts will cool, and our affections will fall down… Satan hath little hope to prevail unless he can persuade us to omit our duties when the clock strikes, and therefore his skill is to urge us to put off till another time as fitter or better. Do it anon, next hour, next day, next week (saith he); and why not next year?

Delays be dangerous, our hearts will cool, and our affections will fall down… Satan hath little hope to prevail unless he can persuade us to omit our duties when the clock strikes, and therefore his skill is to urge us to put off till another time as fitter or better. Do it anon, next hour, next day, next week (saith he); and why not next year (Richard Capel)?

Reference:   A Puritan Golden Treasury, compiled by I.D.E. Thomas, by permission of Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA. 2000, p. 65.


193.
One of [the] chief and excruciatingly ironic effects [of the ideology of pluralism]: It silences a lot of people… So far as my observation reaches, the silenced are almost always those who if they spoke would say something characteristically…Christian. Try, for example, arguing that unrestricted permission to abort the unborn is a social and political evil at a party in Manhattan or a college town in Minnesota. Your arguments will not be rebutted; heads will merely be turned as from one who has audibly broken wind. If, on the other hand, you argue what is in fact the conventional opinion, you will be praised for courage and compassion. Or relate two conversions, one to Christianity and the other away from it; one will be received as a tale of horrid narrow-mindedness and the other as an example of an open society’s marvelous possibilities.

One of [the] chief and excruciatingly ironic effects [of the ideology of pluralism]: It silences a lot of people… So far as my observation reaches, the silenced are almost always those who if they spoke would say something characteristically…Christian. Try, for example, arguing that unrestricted permission to abort the unborn is a social and political evil at a party in Manhattan or a college town in Minnesota. Your arguments will not be rebutted; heads will merely be turned as from one who has audibly broken wind. If, on the other hand, you argue what is in fact the conventional opinion, you will be praised for courage and compassion. Or relate two conversions, one to Christianity and the other away from it; one will be received as a tale of horrid narrow-mindedness and the other as an example of an open society’s marvelous possibilities (Robert Jensen).

Reference:   The God-Wars, Either/Or: The Gospel or Neopaganism, ed. Carl Braaten and Robert Jenson, Eerdmans, 1995, p. 25.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Pluralism
194.
True saints do what they do because they are drawn by love. True Christians find that the love of God in Christ is so attractive, so beautiful, that they cannot help wanting to serve Him. There is a splendor, a beauty, about God and His ways that lures humans beings to Him.

True saints do what they do because they are drawn by love. True Christians find that the love of God in Christ is so attractive, so beautiful, that they cannot help wanting to serve Him. There is a splendor, a beauty, about God and His ways that lures humans beings to Him (Gerald McDermott).

Reference:   Taken from Seeing God: Twelve Reliable Signs of True Spirituality by Gerald R. McDermott, p. 114. Copyright 1995, InterVarsity Christian Fellowship/USA. Used with permission of the Intervarsity Press, P.O. Box 1400, Downers Grove, IL 60515. www.ivpress.co


195.
If I wish to humble anyone, I should question him about his prayers. I know nothing to compare with this topic for its sorrowful self-confessions.

If I wish to humble anyone, I should question him about his prayers. I know nothing to compare with this topic for its sorrowful self-confessions (Charles Vaughn).

Reference:   Quoted in: Spiritual Leadership by Oswald Sanders, Moody Publishers, 1967, p. 85.


196.
But the Lord God of His infinite and great goodness towards man exceeding His favour unto the lost angels had before all beginning of His great love towards [the] elect appointed of His free gift the means whereby His wrath should be satisfied, man’s sin and guilt done away, and he brought into a far more blessed state than he was created in Adam.

But the Lord God of His infinite and great goodness towards man exceeding His favour unto the lost angels had before all beginning of His great love towards [the] elect appointed of His free gift the means whereby His wrath should be satisfied, man’s sin and guilt done away, and he brought into a far more blessed state than he was created in Adam (John Penry).

Reference:   A Puritan Golden Treasury, compiled by I.D.E. Thomas, by permission of Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA. 2000, p. 252.


197.
Parents must be aware of the personal value of truth for their own sakes and not just for the sakes of their children. We cannot simply make a child believe in a truth because it’s good for them. Their perceptive spirits will sense when we are doing something to engineer or manipulate a certain response. Instead it is the authenticity of parental commitment to truth apart from the lives of the children that brings freedom to share or pass on that truth to them. In other words, a mature motive for passing on truth is that as a parent I hold that truth to have value for my life, independent of my children and their response to it.

Parents must be aware of the personal value of truth for their own sakes and not just for the sakes of their children. We cannot simply make a child believe in a truth because it’s good for them. Their perceptive spirits will sense when we are doing something to engineer or manipulate a certain response. Instead it is the authenticity of parental commitment to truth apart from the lives of the children that brings freedom to share or pass on that truth to them. In other words, a mature motive for passing on truth is that as a parent I hold that truth to have value for my life, independent of my children and their response to it (Tom Cohen).

Reference:   Eternity Magazine, May 19, p. 35.


198.
We have to know that one of the great marks of spiritual maturity is being able to take admonition and rebuke! This matter of being able to admit faults and seek to correct them is a mark of maturity.

We have to know that one of the great marks of spiritual maturity is being able to take admonition and rebuke! This matter of being able to admit faults and seek to correct them is a mark of maturity (Max Forsythe).

Reference:   Sermon: A Lack of Maturity, Malachi 2:1-9.


199.
In the New Testament there is no such person as a Christian who is not a church member. Conversion was described as “the Lord adding to the church” (Acts 2:47). There was no spiritual drifting.

In the New Testament there is no such person as a Christian who is not a church member. Conversion was described as “the Lord adding to the church” (Acts 2:47). There was no spiritual drifting (Douglas Millar).

Reference:   Should I Join A Church? Issue 62, Nov. 1968, p. 21, by permission Banner of Truth, Carlisle, PA.


200.
The special purpose of the deacon is found in Acts 6:1–7; they assist the elders in the ministry to the poor and widows (mercy ministry) so the elders can devote themselves to the ministry of prayer and the Word. As the name implies in the Greek, the deacons’ primary function is that of service. They perform their duties under the oversight of the elders.

The special purpose of the deacon is found in Acts 6:1–7; they assist the elders in the ministry to the poor and widows (mercy ministry) so the elders can devote themselves to the ministry of prayer and the Word. As the name implies in the Greek, the deacons’ primary function is that of service. They perform their duties under the oversight of the elders (Howard Davis).

Reference:   Howard Q. Davis Jr. We Don’t Need Supermen, Tabletalk, July 2008, p. 65. Used by Permission.


Author: Other Authors
Topics: Deacons