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Quotes for Topic: Gospel-applied

1.
We must understand how to separate our “who” from our “do.” What we do does not gain us God’s affection. Who we are by virtue of His unconditional love constrains us through the power of our gratitude to obey Him. If we ever invert these relationships (as is the instinctive, natural impulse of all humanity) by assuming that who we are before God is a consequence of what we do for Him, then we make God’s love conditional and our security questionable.

We must understand how to separate our “who” from our “do.” What we do does not gain us God’s affection. Who we are by virtue of His unconditional love constrains us through the power of our gratitude to obey Him. If we ever invert these relationships (as is the instinctive, natural impulse of all humanity) by assuming that who we are before God is a consequence of what we do for Him, then we make God’s love conditional and our security questionable.    

Reference:  Constrained by the Law of Freedom by Bryan Chapell taken from Holiness by Grace by Bryan Chapell, copyright 2001, Crossway Books, a division of Good News Publishers, Wheaton Illinois 60187, www.crosswaybooks.org. Page 128.


2.
Most of us have never really understood that Christianity is not a self-help religion meant to enable moral people to become more moral. We don’t need a self-help book; we need a Savior. We don’t need to get our collective act together; we need death and resurrection and the life-transforming truths of the gospel. And we don’t need them just once, at the beginning of our Christian life; we need them every moment of every day.

Most of us have never really understood that Christianity is not a self-help religion meant to enable moral people to become more moral. We don’t need a self-help book; we need a Savior. We don’t need to get our collective act together; we need death and resurrection and the life-transforming truths of the gospel. And we don’t need them just once, at the beginning of our Christian life; we need them every moment of every day.

Reference:  Counsel from the Cross, Crossway, 2009, p. 30.


3.
The Gospel which we possess was not given us only to be admired, talked of, professed, but practiced! It was not meant merely to reside in our intellect, memories, tongues, but to be seen in our lives.

The Gospel which we possess was not given us only to be admired, talked of, professed, but practiced! It was not meant merely to reside in our intellect, memories, tongues, but to be seen in our lives.


Author: J.C. Ryle
Topics: Gospel-Applied
4.
[Only those] who have learned well to be earnestly dissatisfied with themselves, and to be confounded with shame at their wretchedness [truly understand the Christian gospel].

[Only those] who have learned well to be earnestly dissatisfied with themselves, and to be confounded with shame at their wretchedness [truly understand the Christian gospel].

Reference:  The Epistles of Paul the Apostle to the Romans and Thessalonians, Eerdmans, www.eerdmans.com, 1979, 8:135.


Author: John Calvin
Topics: Gospel-Applied
5.
The Christian Gospel is about “the glory of Christ,” not about me. And when it is – in some measure – about me, it is not about my being made much of by God, but about God mercifully enabling me to enjoy making much of Him forever.

The Christian Gospel is about “the glory of Christ,” not about me. And when it is - in some measure - about me, it is not about my being made much of by God, but about God mercifully enabling me to enjoy making much of Him forever.

Reference:  Seeing and Savoring Jesus Christ, Crossway, 2004, p. 16.


Author: John Piper
Topics: Gospel-Applied
6.
The secret of the gospel is that we actually do more when we hear less about all we need to do for God and hear more about all that God has already done for us.

The secret of the gospel is that we actually do more when we hear less about all we need to do for God and hear more about all that God has already done for us.

Reference:  On Mission, Changing the World, and Not Being Able To Do It All,” http://thegospelcoalition.org/blogs/kevindeyoung/2009/08/25/on-mission-changing-world-and-not-being.


Author: Kevin DeYoung
Topics: Gospel-Applied
7.
Penal substitution does not turn God into a cosmic child abuser. It does not reduce Christ to the passive victim of some divine injustice. It does not pit the Trinity against itself. No, in the God-forsakenness of Christ on the cross, the love of God and the justice of God are revealed on our behalf. United in purpose, Father and Son act in concert to save God’s people. The sinless Son of God bears our sin, and then God pours out the wrath that our sin deserves, and Jesus the Son endures it so that we, who deserve that wrath, might never encounter it. This is the gospel, the good news of the cross, and it calls us to forsake our sin, to turn away from it and embrace Christ, the forsaken one, so that we may not be forsaken.

Penal substitution does not turn God into a cosmic child abuser. It does not reduce Christ to the passive victim of some divine injustice. It does not pit the Trinity against itself. No, in the God-forsakenness of Christ on the cross, the love of God and the justice of God are revealed on our behalf. United in purpose, Father and Son act in concert to save God’s people. The sinless Son of God bears our sin, and then God pours out the wrath that our sin deserves, and Jesus the Son endures it so that we, who deserve that wrath, might never encounter it. This is the gospel, the good news of the cross, and it calls us to forsake our sin, to turn away from it and embrace Christ, the forsaken one, so that we may not be forsaken.  

Reference:  Forsaken by Mark Dever and Michael Lawrence taken from It Is Well, by Mark Dever and Michael Lawrence, copyright 2010, Crossway Books, a division of Good News Publishers, Wheaton Illinois 60187, www.crosswaybooks.org, page 90.


8.
God did not give us His gospel just so we could embrace it and be converted. Actually, He offers it to us every day as a gift that keeps on giving to us everything we need for life and godliness. The wise believer learns this truth early and becomes proficient in extracting available benefits from the gospel each day. We extract these benefits by being absorbed in the gospel, speaking it to ourselves when necessary, and by daring to reckon it true in all we do.

God did not give us His gospel just so we could embrace it and be converted. Actually, He offers it to us every day as a gift that keeps on giving to us everything we need for life and godliness. The wise believer learns this truth early and becomes proficient in extracting available benefits from the gospel each day. We extract these benefits by being absorbed in the gospel, speaking it to ourselves when necessary, and by daring to reckon it true in all we do.

Reference:  A Gospel Primer, Focus Publishing, 2008, p. 5.


Author: Milton Vincent
Topics: Gospel-Applied
9.
Over the course of time, preaching the gospel to myself every day has made more of a difference in my life than any other discipline I have ever practiced. I find myself sinning less, but just as importantly, I find myself recovering my footing more quickly after sinning, due to the immediate comfort found in the gospel. I have also found that when I am absorbed in the gospel, everything else I am supposed to be toward God and others seems to flow out of me more naturally and passionately. Doing right is not always easy, but it is never more easy when one is breathing deeply the atmosphere of the gospel.

Over the course of time, preaching the gospel to myself every day has made more of a difference in my life than any other discipline I have ever practiced. I find myself sinning less, but just as importantly, I find myself recovering my footing more quickly after sinning, due to the immediate comfort found in the gospel. I have also found that when I am absorbed in the gospel, everything else I am supposed to be toward God and others seems to flow out of me more naturally and passionately. Doing right is not always easy, but it is never more easy when one is breathing deeply the atmosphere of the gospel.

Reference:  A Gospel Primer for Christians: Learning to See the Glories of God’s Love, Focus Publishing, 2008, p. 6, Used by Permission.


Author: Milton Vincent
Topics: Gospel-Applied
10.
It is not easy to get the law killed. Something of a legal disposition remains even in the believer while he is in this world. Many a stroke does self and self-righteousness get, but still it revives again. If he were wholly dead to the law, he would be wholly dead to sin. But so far as the law lives, sin lives. They that think they know the gospel well enough betray their ignorance. No man can be too evangelical [gospel-centered]. It will take all his life-time to get a legal temper destroyed.

It is not easy to get the law killed. Something of a legal disposition remains even in the believer while he is in this world. Many a stroke does self and self-righteousness get, but still it revives again. If he were wholly dead to the law, he would be wholly dead to sin. But so far as the law lives, sin lives. They that think they know the gospel well enough betray their ignorance. No man can be too evangelical [gospel-centered]. It will take all his life-time to get a legal temper destroyed.

Reference:  A Collection of Sermons from Various Important Subjects, 1763, II:134-135.


11.
Understanding the Gospel message and receiving the Gospel message always shows itself in manifesting the Gospel message in our actions.

Understanding the Gospel message and receiving the Gospel message always shows itself in manifesting the Gospel message in our actions.  

Reference:  The First Order of Business, Ephesians 4:1-6, January 8, 2017.


12.
The Gospel message is simply this, are you all-in for Christ? And if so, how are you being transformed? The only Gospel that saves in Christ is the Gospel that transforms to make us like Christ.

The Gospel message is simply this, are you all-in for Christ? And if so, how are you being transformed? The only Gospel that saves in Christ is the Gospel that transforms to make us like Christ.

Reference:  Sermon, A Successful Gospel-Centered Ministry – Part 1, 2 Corinthians 4:1-6, April 13, 2014.


Author: Randy Smith
Topics: Gospel-Applied
13.
Yes, our deeds of mercy is a platform to help people believe the Gospel, but that is not the primary reason for mercy. Mercy is ultimately a natural expression from those who already believe the Gospel.

Yes, our deeds of mercy is a platform to help people believe the Gospel, but that is not the primary reason for mercy. Mercy is ultimately a natural expression from those who already believe the Gospel.


14.
Men would sooner believe that the gospel is from heaven, if they saw more such effects of it upon the hearts and lives of those who profess it. The world is better able to read the nature of religion in a man’s life than in the Bible.

Men would sooner believe that the gospel is from heaven, if they saw more such effects of it upon the hearts and lives of those who profess it. The world is better able to read the nature of religion in a man’s life than in the Bible.

Reference:  The Reformed Pastor, Chapter 2, Section 1.


15.
There are two things to do about the gospel: believe it and behave it.

There are two things to do about the gospel: believe it and behave it.


Author: Susanna Wesley
Topics: Gospel-Applied
16.
The answer isn’t to try harder in the Christian life but to comprehend more fully and clearly Christ’s incredible work on behalf of sinners and then to live in a more vital awareness of that grace day by day. Our main problem in the Christian life, in other words, is not that we don’t try hard enough to be good, but that we haven’t thought out the deep implications of the gospel and applied its powerful reality to all parts of our life. Real spiritual growth happens as we continually rediscover the gospel.

The answer isn’t to try harder in the Christian life but to comprehend more fully and clearly Christ’s incredible work on behalf of sinners and then to live in a more vital awareness of that grace day by day. Our main problem in the Christian life, in other words, is not that we don’t try hard enough to be good, but that we haven’t thought out the deep implications of the gospel and applied its powerful reality to all parts of our life. Real spiritual growth happens as we continually rediscover the gospel.

Reference:  Worship by Tullian Tchividjian taken from Don’t Call it a Comeback, edited by Kevin DeYoung, copyright 2011, Crossway Books, a division of Good News Publishers, Wheaton Illinois 60187, www.crosswaybooks.org, p. 222.


17.
The gospel isn’t simply the ABCs of Christianity, but the A through Z. The gospel doesn’t just ignite the Christian life; it’s the fuel that keeps Christians going and growing every day. Once God rescues sinners, His plan isn’t to steer them beyond the gospel but to move them more deeply into it. After all, the only antidote to sin is the gospel – and since Christians remain sinners even after they’re converted, the gospel must be the medicine a Christian takes every day. Since we never leave off sinning, we can never leave the gospel.

The gospel isn’t simply the ABCs of Christianity, but the A through Z. The gospel doesn’t just ignite the Christian life; it’s the fuel that keeps Christians going and growing every day. Once God rescues sinners, His plan isn’t to steer them beyond the gospel but to move them more deeply into it. After all, the only antidote to sin is the gospel – and since Christians remain sinners even after they’re converted, the gospel must be the medicine a Christian takes every day. Since we never leave off sinning, we can never leave the gospel.

Reference:  Worship by Tullian Tchividjian taken from Don’t Call it a Comeback, edited by Kevin DeYoung, copyright 2011, Crossway Books, a division of Good News Publishers, Wheaton Illinois 60187, www.crosswaybooks.org, p. 221.