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Quotes for Topic: Ethnic-diversity

1.
People who treat others as inferior are those who themselves suffer from a sense of inferiority and insecurity. Others are a threat to them because they don’t have a sense of being important to the eternal God. They don’t have the assurance that this God will look after them more than adequately. When we lose sight of our identity in Christ, lesser identifying features, like race, class, caste, and education, become significant. We try to find our identity by acting more significant than others.

People who treat others as inferior are those who themselves suffer from a sense of inferiority and insecurity. Others are a threat to them because they don’t have a sense of being important to the eternal God. They don’t have the assurance that this God will look after them more than adequately. When we lose sight of our identity in Christ, lesser identifying features, like race, class, caste, and education, become significant. We try to find our identity by acting more significant than others.    

Reference:  The New Humanity by Ajith Fernando taken from The Supremacy of Christ by Ajith Fernando, copyright 1995, Crossway Books, a division of Good News Publishers, Wheaton Illinois 60187, www.crosswaybooks.org, p. 200.


2.
[Christ’s death] is not a redemption of all people without exception, but of all without distinction.

[Christ's death] is not a redemption of all people without exception, but of all without distinction.

Reference:  Revelation, The New International Greek Testament Commentary, Eerdmans, www.eerdmans.com, 1999, p. 359.


Author: G.K. Beale
3.
Because I had been a basketball player, it never dawned on me to evaluate people on the basis of color. If you could play, you could play. In America it would appear that there is more openness, acceptance, and teamwork in the gym than in the church of Jesus Christ.

Because I had been a basketball player, it never dawned on me to evaluate people on the basis of color. If you could play, you could play. In America it would appear that there is more openness, acceptance, and teamwork in the gym than in the church of Jesus Christ.

Reference:  Fresh Wind, Fresh Fire, Zondervan Publishing House, p. 35.


4.
It was [Paul’s] mission as the “apostle to the Gentiles,” and it is the universal church’s mission as well, to promote that harmony of cultures in Christ that the cross brings them (or, we might say, forces upon them for their good). Imagine what it took for this former Jewish leader to accept that the Jews’ lofty position as God’s chosen people is not ultimately about ethnic Jews, but only Jewish Christians who share the position with “Gentile dogs” who have also become Christians. The promises made to the Jews are for all who are in Christ; the inheritance is both for Jews and Gentiles. We are all members of one body. The immensity of this new knowledge is not only enough to cause every God-fearing Jew to scream curses at Paul, but is the very reason Gentiles like me have any hope whatsoever. Paul carried this message everywhere.

It was [Paul’s] mission as the “apostle to the Gentiles,” and it is the universal church’s mission as well, to promote that harmony of cultures in Christ that the cross brings them (or, we might say, forces upon them for their good). Imagine what it took for this former Jewish leader to accept that the Jews’ lofty position as God’s chosen people is not ultimately about ethnic Jews, but only Jewish Christians who share the position with “Gentile dogs” who have also become Christians. The promises made to the Jews are for all who are in Christ; the inheritance is both for Jews and Gentiles. We are all members of one body. The immensity of this new knowledge is not only enough to cause every God-fearing Jew to scream curses at Paul, but is the very reason Gentiles like me have any hope whatsoever. Paul carried this message everywhere.

Reference:  Multi-Cultural Glory in the Church, Christian Communicators Worldwide, www.CCWtoday.org.Used by Permission.


Author: Jim Elliff
5.
An additional impetus to our unity among diversity is that of the projected makeup of the future kingdom. It is glorious in its admixture of those from “every tribe and tongue and people and nation” (Rev. 5:11). We cannot, must not, live contrary to our final convergence in Christ. In the ugly old slavery of early America, the schizophrenia about this was incredible. There were blacks and whites who would not dream of worshipping as equals (though they were sometimes in the same building), yet at the same time would hold the doctrinal verity that all colors would be in heaven together some day. This was entirely incongruous. We are called to experience in this life as much of the spirit that will characterize us in the new earth as is possible. The ideal of heaven is always to be the pursuit of earthbound believers. “Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven” (Matt. 6:10). We cannot pray for the Kingdom to come and not relish what that coming Kingdom means. Our community of believers is to be a living demonstration of the power of the cross and also of the purified Bride who awaits the wedding. We are denying our future calling to fail in this area. We are smearing our reputation and throwing dirt on our bridal gown.

An additional impetus to our unity among diversity is that of the projected makeup of the future kingdom. It is glorious in its admixture of those from “every tribe and tongue and people and nation” (Rev. 5:11). We cannot, must not, live contrary to our final convergence in Christ. In the ugly old slavery of early America, the schizophrenia about this was incredible. There were blacks and whites who would not dream of worshipping as equals (though they were sometimes in the same building), yet at the same time would hold the doctrinal verity that all colors would be in heaven together some day. This was entirely incongruous. We are called to experience in this life as much of the spirit that will characterize us in the new earth as is possible. The ideal of heaven is always to be the pursuit of earthbound believers. “Your will be done, on earth as it is in heaven” (Matt. 6:10). We cannot pray for the Kingdom to come and not relish what that coming Kingdom means. Our community of believers is to be a living demonstration of the power of the cross and also of the purified Bride who awaits the wedding. We are denying our future calling to fail in this area. We are smearing our reputation and throwing dirt on our bridal gown.

Reference:  Multi-Cultural Glory in the Church, Christian Communicators Worldwide, www.CCWtoday.org. Used by Permission.


Author: Jim Elliff
6.
Although the gospel does not approve of removing slavery by social revolution, the gospel throughout history has brought the freedom of more slaves than any human philosophy, movement, or political system.  In past times, some Christians, unfortunately, have supported and tried to justify slavery.  But the Bible does not; and where Christians are faithful to Scripture, slavery cannot flourish.

Although the gospel does not approve of removing slavery by social revolution, the gospel throughout history has brought the freedom of more slaves than any human philosophy, movement, or political system.  In past times, some Christians, unfortunately, have supported and tried to justify slavery.  But the Bible does not; and where Christians are faithful to Scripture, slavery cannot flourish.

Reference:  1 Corinthians, Moody, 1984, p. 174.


7.
If we want the meaning and the worth and the beauty and the power of the cross of Christ to be seen and loved in our churches, and if the design of the death of His Son is not only to reconcile us to God but to reconcile alienated ethnic groups to each other in Christ, then will we not display and magnify the cross of Christ better by more and deeper and sweeter ethnic diversity and unity in our worship and life?

If we want the meaning and the worth and the beauty and the power of the cross of Christ to be seen and loved in our churches, and if the design of the death of His Son is not only to reconcile us to God but to reconcile alienated ethnic groups to each other in Christ, then will we not display and magnify the cross of Christ better by more and deeper and sweeter ethnic diversity and unity in our worship and life?

Reference:  Brothers, We Are Not Professionals, Bethlehem Baptist Church, 2002, p.207.


Author: John Piper
8.
[For Christians] the ground is level at the foot of the cross. This being so, it is absurd to be partial toward anyone. All should be treated equally – as beings created in the image of God. Rich and poor should be accorded equal honor and cordiality. Discrimination or favoritism is spiritually irrational.

[For Christians] the ground is level at the foot of the cross. This being so, it is absurd to be partial toward anyone. All should be treated equally – as beings created in the image of God. Rich and poor should be accorded equal honor and cordiality. Discrimination or favoritism is spiritually irrational.

Reference:  Taken from James by Kent Hughes, copyright 1991, Crossway Books, a division of Good News Publishers, Wheaton Illinois 60187, p. 94, www.crosswaybooks.org.


9.
When the Gospel enables us to live in love, even though we may have nothing else in common save Christ, it is a testimony to its power to transform a group of sinful, self-centered people into a loving community united by a common relationship with Jesus Christ.

When the Gospel enables us to live in love, even though we may have nothing else in common save Christ, it is a testimony to its power to transform a group of sinful, self-centered people into a loving community united by a common relationship with Jesus Christ.

Reference:  Loving Each Other, taken from The Deliberate Church, © 2005, Crossway Books, a division of Good News Publishers, Wheaton Illinois 60187, p. 111, www.crosswaybooks.org.


10.
The family of God is ethnically and culturally diverse. As Christians we not only permit such diversity, but we cherish it.  This is because God Himself cherishes ethnic diversity. He is not color-blind; He is colorful. At His throne God welcomes worshipers “from every nation, tribe, people and language” (Rev. 7:9). His plan of redemption is for the peoples of the world in all their rich variety.

The family of God is ethnically and culturally diverse. As Christians we not only permit such diversity, but we cherish it. This is because God Himself cherishes ethnic diversity. He is not color-blind; He is colorful. At His throne God welcomes worshipers “from every nation, tribe, people and language” (Rev. 7:9). His plan of redemption is for the peoples of the world in all their rich variety.

Reference:  Is Jesus the Only Way? Crossway, 1999, p. 29.


11.
It’s without doubt that the population of heaven is multi-ethnic. There are many places you can turn in the Bible if you wish to prove the sin of racial discrimination, but when we read those in heaven are from “every tribe and tongue and people and nation” (Rev. 5:9), it’s unmistakable that God’s does not judge one’s worth based upon a superficial distinction such as skin pigmentation. God looks at the heart. And He loves and welcomes all people who have a heart to do His will. We live in a world that likes to separate. In God’s economy the only separation seen is those with Christ and those without Christ. Ultimately, that is all that matters.

It’s without doubt that the population of heaven is multi-ethnic. There are many places you can turn in the Bible if you wish to prove the sin of racial discrimination, but when we read those in heaven are from “every tribe and tongue and people and nation” (Rev. 5:9), it’s unmistakable that God’s does not judge one’s worth based upon a superficial distinction such as skin pigmentation. God looks at the heart. And He loves and welcomes all people who have a heart to do His will. We live in a world that likes to separate. In God’s economy the only separation seen is those with Christ and those without Christ. Ultimately, that is all that matters.

Reference:  Sermon: Before the Throne of God Above, Revelation 7:1-17, November 8, 2015.


Author: Randy Smith
12.
Christ solved the problem of discrimination. Through the shedding of His blood, He made us understand that we are the same in essence. That God looks not at these superficial externals and therefore neither should we. That we all deserve of hell, but in response to His marvelous grace we who deserve only hell can be made alive and brought together in His spiritual family under the loving bonds on one heavenly Father.

Christ solved the problem of discrimination. Through the shedding of His blood, He made us understand that we are the same in essence. That God looks not at these superficial externals and therefore neither should we. That we all deserve of hell, but in response to His marvelous grace we who deserve only hell can be made alive and brought together in His spiritual family under the loving bonds on one heavenly Father.  

Reference:  Sermon, Meet a Man of God, Ephesians 3:1-13, December 4, 2016.


Author: Randy Smith
13.
Racism isn’t a bad habit; it’s not a mistake; it’s a sin. The answer is not sociology; it’s theology.

Racism isn't a bad habit; it's not a mistake; it's a sin. The answer is not sociology; it's theology.


Author: Tony Evans