The Scripture likens bitterness to a root (Heb. 12:15). Roots have to be planted. So, what’s the seed that sprouts into a root of bitterness when planted? It’s a hurt. When someone hurts you it’s as if a seed has been dropped onto the soil of your heart. You can choose to respond in two ways: You can either reach down and pluck up the seed by forgiving your offender, or you can begin to cultivate the seed by reviewing the hurt over and over again in your mind. Bitterness is the result of dwelling too long on a hurt; it’s the result of not truly forgiving the offender (Mt. 18:34-35).

The Scripture likens bitterness to a root (Heb. 12:15). Roots have to be planted. So, what’s the seed that sprouts into a root of bitterness when planted? It’s a hurt. When someone hurts you it’s as if a seed has been dropped onto the soil of your heart. You can choose to respond in two ways: You can either reach down and pluck up the seed by forgiving your offender, or you can begin to cultivate the seed by reviewing the hurt over and over again in your mind. Bitterness is the result of dwelling too long on a hurt; it’s the result of not truly forgiving the offender (Mt. 18:34-35).

The Scripture likens bitterness to a root (Heb. 12:15). Roots have to be planted. So, what’s the seed that sprouts into a root of bitterness when planted? It’s a hurt. When someone hurts you it’s as if a seed has been dropped onto the soil of your heart. You can choose to respond in two ways: You can either reach down and pluck up the seed by forgiving your offender, or you can begin to cultivate the seed by reviewing the hurt over and over again in your mind. Bitterness is the result of dwelling too long on a hurt; it’s the result of not truly forgiving the offender (Mt. 18:34-35).

By |2015-08-06T18:52:50-04:00August 6th, 2015|0 Comments

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