Philosophical naturalism-the world-view undergirding evolutionism-can provide only three explanations for the existence of the universe in which we live. The first is that the universe is merely an illusion. This notion carries little weight in an age of scientific enlightenment. As has been well said, "even a full-blown solipsist looks both ways before crossing the street." The second is that the universe sprang from nothing. As previously pointed out, this proposition flies in the face of the law of cause and effect. And the third is that the universe eternally existed. This hypothesis is devastated by the law of entropy, which predicts that a universe that has eternally existed would have died an "eternity ago" from heat loss.  There is, however, one other possibility. It is found in the first chapter of the first book of the Bible: "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth" (Genesis 1:1). In an age of enlightenment and empirical science, nothing could be more certain, clear or correct.

Philosophical naturalism-the world-view undergirding evolutionism-can provide only three explanations for the existence of the universe in which we live. The first is that the universe is merely an illusion. This notion carries little weight in an age of scientific enlightenment. As has been well said, "even a full-blown solipsist looks both ways before crossing the street." The second is that the universe sprang from nothing. As previously pointed out, this proposition flies in the face of the law of cause and effect. And the third is that the universe eternally existed. This hypothesis is devastated by the law of entropy, which predicts that a universe that has eternally existed would have died an "eternity ago" from heat loss.  There is, however, one other possibility. It is found in the first chapter of the first book of the Bible: "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth" (Genesis 1:1). In an age of enlightenment and empirical science, nothing could be more certain, clear or correct.

Philosophical naturalism-the world-view undergirding evolutionism-can provide only three explanations for the existence of the universe in which we live. The first is that the universe is merely an illusion. This notion carries little weight in an age of scientific enlightenment. As has been well said, "even a full-blown solipsist looks both ways before crossing the street." The second is that the universe sprang from nothing. As previously pointed out, this proposition flies in the face of the law of cause and effect. And the third is that the universe eternally existed. This hypothesis is devastated by the law of entropy, which predicts that a universe that has eternally existed would have died an "eternity ago" from heat loss.  There is, however, one other possibility. It is found in the first chapter of the first book of the Bible: "In the beginning God created the heavens and the earth" (Genesis 1:1). In an age of enlightenment and empirical science, nothing could be more certain, clear or correct.

By |2015-04-03T20:02:17-05:00April 3rd, 2015|0 Comments

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