C.S. Lewis

Quotes of Author: Cs-lewis

101.
If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for another world.

If I find in myself a desire which no experience in this world can satisfy, the most probable explanation is that I was made for another world.

Reference:   Mere Christianity, Macmillan, 1960, p. 119.


102.
Non-Christians seem to think that the Incarnation implies some particular merit or excellence in humanity. But of course it implies just the reverse: a particular demerit and depravity. No creature that deserved Redemption would need to be redeemed. They that are whole need not the physician. Christ died for men precisely because men are not worth dying for; to make them worth it.

Non-Christians seem to think that the Incarnation implies some particular merit or excellence in humanity. But of course it implies just the reverse: a particular demerit and depravity. No creature that deserved Redemption would need to be redeemed. They that are whole need not the physician. Christ died for men precisely because men are not worth dying for; to make them worth it.


103.
The central miracle asserted by Christians is the incarnation. They say that God became man.

The central miracle asserted by Christians is the incarnation. They say that God became man.


104.
Once a man is united to God, how could he not live forever?

Once a man is united to God, how could he not live forever?


105.
In Scripture the visitation of an angel is always alarming; it has to begin by saying “Fear not.” The Victorian angel looks as if it were going to say, “There, there.”

In Scripture the visitation of an angel is always alarming; it has to begin by saying “Fear not.” The Victorian angel looks as if it were going to say, “There, there.”


Author: C.S. Lewis
Topics: Angels
106.
Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance. The only thing it cannot be is moderately important.

Christianity, if false, is of no importance, and if true, of infinite importance. The only thing it cannot be is moderately important.


107.
We must lay before Him what is in us, not what ought to be within us.

We must lay before Him what is in us, not what ought to be within us.

Reference:   Letters to Malcolm: Chiefly on Prayer, Brace and World, p. 22.


Author: C.S. Lewis
108.
A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would either be a lunatic – on a level with the man who says he is a poached egg – or else the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God: or else a madman or something worse. You can shut him up for a fool, you can spit at him and kill him as a demon, or you can fall at his feet and call him Lord and God. But let us not come with any patronizing nonsense about his being a great moral teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to.

A man who was merely a man and said the sort of things Jesus said would not be a great moral teacher. He would either be a lunatic – on a level with the man who says he is a poached egg – or else the Devil of Hell. You must make your choice. Either this man was, and is, the Son of God: or else a madman or something worse. You can shut him up for a fool, you can spit at him and kill him as a demon, or you can fall at his feet and call him Lord and God. But let us not come with any patronizing nonsense about his being a great moral teacher. He has not left that open to us. He did not intend to.

Reference:   Mere Christianity, MacMillan Publishing, p. 56.


109.
He who has God and everything else has no more than he who has God only.

He who has God and everything else has no more than he who has God only.

Reference:   The Weight of Glory.


110.
We want, in fact, not so much a father in heaven as a grandfather in heaven: a senile benevolence who, as they say, “liked to see young people enjoying themselves” and whose plan for the universe was simply that it might be truly said at the end of each day, “a good time was had by all.”

We want, in fact, not so much a father in heaven as a grandfather in heaven: a senile benevolence who, as they say, “liked to see young people enjoying themselves” and whose plan for the universe was simply that it might be truly said at the end of each day, “a good time was had by all.”


Author: C.S. Lewis
Topics: God-Fatherhood
111.
The enemy will not see you vanish into God’s company without an effort to reclaim you.

The enemy will not see you vanish into God’s company without an effort to reclaim you.


112.
The perfect church service would be one we were almost unaware of; our attention would have been on God.

The perfect church service would be one we were almost unaware of; our attention would have been on God.


113.
To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly be broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give your heart to no one, not even to an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements; lock it up safe in the casket or coffin or your selfishness. But in that casket—safe, dark, motionless, airless—it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable…The only place outside Heaven where you can be perfectly safe from all the dangers…of love is Hell.

To love at all is to be vulnerable. Love anything, and your heart will certainly be wrung and possibly be broken. If you want to make sure of keeping it intact, you must give your heart to no one, not even to an animal. Wrap it carefully round with hobbies and little luxuries; avoid all entanglements; lock it up safe in the casket or coffin or your selfishness. But in that casket—safe, dark, motionless, airless—it will change. It will not be broken; it will become unbreakable, impenetrable, irredeemable...The only place outside Heaven where you can be perfectly safe from all the dangers...of love is Hell.

Reference:   The Four Loves, 1963, p. 111-112.


Author: C.S. Lewis
114.
Affection is responsible for nine-tenths of whatever solid and durable happiness there is in our lives.

Affection is responsible for nine-tenths of whatever solid and durable happiness there is in our lives.


Author: C.S. Lewis
115.
No man knows how bad he is till he has tried very hard to be good. A silly idea is current that good people do not know what temptation means. This is an obvious lie. Only those who try to resist temptation know how strong it is. After all, you find out the strength of the German army by fighting it, not by giving in. A man who gives in to temptation after five minutes simply does not know what it would have been like an hour later. That is why bad people, in one sense, know very little about badness. They have lived a sheltered life by always giving in.  We never find out the strength of the evil impulse inside us until we try to fight it.

No man knows how bad he is till he has tried very hard to be good. A silly idea is current that good people do not know what temptation means. This is an obvious lie. Only those who try to resist temptation know how strong it is. After all, you find out the strength of the German army by fighting it, not by giving in. A man who gives in to temptation after five minutes simply does not know what it would have been like an hour later. That is why bad people, in one sense, know very little about badness. They have lived a sheltered life by always giving in.  We never find out the strength of the evil impulse inside us until we try to fight it.

Reference:   Mere Christianity.


Author: C.S. Lewis
Topics: Temptation
116.
Christ, because He was the only Man who never yielded to temptation, is also the only Man who knows to the full what temptation means.

Christ, because He was the only Man who never yielded to temptation, is also the only Man who knows to the full what temptation means.

Reference:   Today in the Word, November 1998, p. 24.