C.H. Spurgeon

Quotes of Author: Ch-spurgeon

101.
Believing is a matter of the will. A man does not believe without being willing to believe.

Believing is a matter of the will. A man does not believe without being willing to believe.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Faith-Source
102.
God’s heart, not mine, is the measure of His giving; not my capacity to receive, but His capacity to give.

God’s heart, not mine, is the measure of His giving; not my capacity to receive, but His capacity to give.


103.
There are some of your graces which would never be discovered if it were not for your trials.

There are some of your graces which would never be discovered if it were not for your trials.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Trials-Benefits
104.
Winners of souls must first be weepers for souls.

Winners of souls must first be weepers for souls.


105.
It is a reading age, a preaching age, a working age, but it is not a praying age.

It is a reading age, a preaching age, a working age, but it is not a praying age.


106.
A prayerless church member is a hindrance. He is in the body like a rotting bone or a decayed tooth. Before long, since he does not contribute to the benefit of his brethren, he will become a danger and a sorrow to them. Neglect of private prayer is the locust which devours the strength of the church.

A prayerless church member is a hindrance. He is in the body like a rotting bone or a decayed tooth. Before long, since he does not contribute to the benefit of his brethren, he will become a danger and a sorrow to them. Neglect of private prayer is the locust which devours the strength of the church.


107.
Satan greatly approves of our railing at each other, but God does not.

Satan greatly approves of our railing at each other, but God does not.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Conflict-Church
108.
We rob the gospel of its power if we leave out its threatenings of punishment.

We rob the gospel of its power if we leave out its threatenings of punishment.


109.
Not even in this world does sin pay its servants good wages.

Not even in this world does sin pay its servants good wages.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Sin-Danger
110.
The more you know about Christ, the less you will be satisfied with superficial views of Him.

The more you know about Christ, the less you will be satisfied with superficial views of Him.


111.
There is mercy for a sinner, but there is no mercy for the man who will not own himself a sinner.

There is mercy for a sinner, but there is no mercy for the man who will not own himself a sinner.


112.
Serve God with integrity, and if you achieve no success, at least no sin will lie upon your conscience.

Serve God with integrity, and if you achieve no success, at least no sin will lie upon your conscience.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Integrity
113.
Of all the things in the world that stink in the nostrils of men, hypocrisy is the worst.

Of all the things in the world that stink in the nostrils of men, hypocrisy is the worst.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Hypocrisy
114.
Let us aspire to saintliness of spirit and character. I am persuaded that the greatest power we can get over our fellow-men is the power which comes of consecration and holiness.

Let us aspire to saintliness of spirit and character. I am persuaded that the greatest power we can get over our fellow-men is the power which comes of consecration and holiness.

Reference:   An All-Round Ministry, 1900.


115.
Sin has been pardoned at such a price that we cannot henceforth trifle with it.

Sin has been pardoned at such a price that we cannot henceforth trifle with it.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Sin-Hated
116.
To deny the great doctrine of atonement by the blood of Jesus Christ is to hamstring the gospel, and to cut the throat of Christianity.

To deny the great doctrine of atonement by the blood of Jesus Christ is to hamstring the gospel, and to cut the throat of Christianity.


117.
Nearness to God brings likeness to God. The more you see God the more of God will be seen in you.

Nearness to God brings likeness to God. The more you see God the more of God will be seen in you.


118.
He who tells little lies, will soon think nothing of great ones, for the principle is the same.

He who tells little lies, will soon think nothing of great ones, for the principle is the same.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Honesty
119.
We often talk of unbelief as if it were an affliction to be pitied instead of a crime to be condemned.

We often talk of unbelief as if it were an affliction to be pitied instead of a crime to be condemned.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Unbelief
120.
I believe nothing merely because Calvin taught it, but because I have found his teaching in the Word of God.

I believe nothing merely because Calvin taught it, but because I have found his teaching in the Word of God.


121.
As for beauty, one of its most potent charms lies in its modest unconsciousness; it is greatly marred when accompanied by vanity.

As for beauty, one of its most potent charms lies in its modest unconsciousness; it is greatly marred when accompanied by vanity.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Beauty
Vanity
122.
A God who could pardon without justice might one of these days condemn without reason.

A God who could pardon without justice might one of these days condemn without reason.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: God-Justice
123.
Our old man is crucified, but he is long at dying.

Our old man is crucified, but he is long at dying.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Sin-Indwelling
124.
Begin early to teach, for children begin early to sin.

Begin early to teach, for children begin early to sin.


125.
It is easier to save us from our sins than from our righteousness.

It is easier to save us from our sins than from our righteousness.


126.
When thou sleepest, think that thou art resting on the battlefield; when thou walkest, suspect an ambush in every hedge.

When thou sleepest, think that thou art resting on the battlefield; when thou walkest, suspect an ambush in every hedge.


127.
The shop, the barn, the scullery, and the smithy become temples when men and women do all to the glory of God!

The shop, the barn, the scullery, and the smithy become temples when men and women do all to the glory of God!


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Work
128.
If a man tells me that he is humble, I know him to be profoundly proud.

If a man tells me that he is humble, I know him to be profoundly proud.


129.
Christ is the cause of the greatest division, but He is also the medium of the greatest union.

Christ is the cause of the greatest division, but He is also the medium of the greatest union.


130.
Ah! if there be degrees in glory, they will not be distributed according to our talents, but according to our faithfulness in using them.

Ah! if there be degrees in glory, they will not be distributed according to our talents, but according to our faithfulness in using them.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Spiritual-Gifts
131.
The best morality in the world will not prove a man to be a Christian, but if a man has not morality, it proves that he is not a child of God.

The best morality in the world will not prove a man to be a Christian, but if a man has not morality, it proves that he is not a child of God.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Morality
132.
Doubt Thee, my Lord? I could doubt all except Thee; and doubt myself most of all.

Doubt Thee, my Lord? I could doubt all except Thee; and doubt myself most of all.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Doubt
133.
God is a sure paymaster, though He does not always pay at the end of every week.

God is a sure paymaster, though He does not always pay at the end of every week.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Rewards-Eternal
134.
Patience! patience! you are always in a hurry, but God is not.

Patience! patience! you are always in a hurry, but God is not.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Patience
135.
Christ and we will never be one until we and our sin are two.

Christ and we will never be one until we and our sin are two.


136.
Believing right doctrine will no more save you, than doing good works will save you.

Believing right doctrine will no more save you, than doing good works will save you.


137.
You must keep all earthy treasures out of your heart, and let Christ be your treasure, and let Him have your heart.

You must keep all earthy treasures out of your heart, and let Christ be your treasure, and let Him have your heart.


138.
If you are idle in Christ’s work, you are active in the devil’s work.

If you are idle in Christ’s work, you are active in the devil’s work.


139.
God soon turns from His wrath, but he never turns from his love.

God soon turns from His wrath, but he never turns from his love.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
140.
We should begin to pray before we kneel down and we should not cease when we rise up.

We should begin to pray before we kneel down and we should not cease when we rise up.


141.
Obedience rendered without delight in rendering it is only half obedience.

Obedience rendered without delight in rendering it is only half obedience.


142.
O think, that he who was master of all heaven’s majesty came down to be the victim of all man’s misery!

O think, that he who was master of all heaven’s majesty came down to be the victim of all man’s misery!


143.
Blood, always precious, is priceless when it streams from Immanuel’s side.

Blood, always precious, is priceless when it streams from Immanuel’s side.


144.
Frequently the murmuring against man is only a covert way of murmuring against God.

Frequently the murmuring against man is only a covert way of murmuring against God.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Complaining
145.
There is little virtue in the beauty which calls attention to itself; modest beauty is the last to extol its own charms.

There is little virtue in the beauty which calls attention to itself; modest beauty is the last to extol its own charms.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Apparel
146.
A Jesus who never wept could never wipe away my tears.

A Jesus who never wept could never wipe away my tears.


147.
You shall never make a missionary of the person who does no good at home.

You shall never make a missionary of the person who does no good at home.


148.
May your character be not a writing upon the sand, but an inscription upon the rock.

May your character be not a writing upon the sand, but an inscription upon the rock.


149.
I will not believe that you have tasted of the honey of the gospel if you can eat it all by yourself.

I will not believe that you have tasted of the honey of the gospel if you can eat it all by yourself.


150.
Sooner could a fish live upon a tree than the wicked in Paradise.

Sooner could a fish live upon a tree than the wicked in Paradise.


151.
Child of God, you cost Christ too much for Him to forget you.

Child of God, you cost Christ too much for Him to forget you.


152.
The voices of childhood echo throughout life. The first learned is generally the last forgotten.

The voices of childhood echo throughout life. The first learned is generally the last forgotten.


153.
If we choose a false way of worship we shall, before long, choose to worship a false god.

If we choose a false way of worship we shall, before long, choose to worship a false god.


154.
You never have to drag mercy out of Christ, as money from a miser.

You never have to drag mercy out of Christ, as money from a miser.


155.
The worst thing thou has to fear is the treachery of thine own heart.

The worst thing thou has to fear is the treachery of thine own heart.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Heart
156.
If you are not content with what you have, you would not be satisfied if it were doubled.

If you are not content with what you have, you would not be satisfied if it were doubled.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Contentment
157.
If you are drawn into a controversy, use very hard arguments and very soft words.

If you are drawn into a controversy, use very hard arguments and very soft words.


158.
The more of heaven there is in our lives, the less of earth we shall covet.

The more of heaven there is in our lives, the less of earth we shall covet.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Covetousness
159.
Little learning and much pride come of hasty reading.

Little learning and much pride come of hasty reading.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Books-Reading
160.
When you go through a trial, the sovereignty of God is the pillow upon which you lay your head.

When you go through a trial, the sovereignty of God is the pillow upon which you lay your head.


161.
See you here the foundational truth of Christianity, the rock on which our hopes are built. It is the only hope of a sinner, and the only true joy of the Christian – the great transaction, the great substitution, the great lifting of sin from the sinner to the sinner’s Surety; the punishment of the Surety instead of the sinner, the pouring out of the vials of wrath, which were due to the transgressor, upon the head of his Substitute; the grandest transaction which ever took place on earth; the most wonderful sight that even hell ever beheld, and the most stupendous marvel that heaven itself ever executed – Jesus Christ, made sin for us, that we might be made the righteousness of God in Him! You scarcely need that I should explain the words when the sense is so plain. A spotless Savior stands in the room of guilty sinners. God lays upon the spotless Savior the sin of the guilty, so that He becomes, in the expressive language of the text, sin. Then He takes off from the innocent Savior His righteousness, and puts that to the account of the once-guilty sinners, so that the sinners become righteousness – righteousness of the highest and divinest source, the righteousness of God in Christ Jesus.

See you here the foundational truth of Christianity, the rock on which our hopes are built. It is the only hope of a sinner, and the only true joy of the Christian – the great transaction, the great substitution, the great lifting of sin from the sinner to the sinner's Surety; the punishment of the Surety instead of the sinner, the pouring out of the vials of wrath, which were due to the transgressor, upon the head of his Substitute; the grandest transaction which ever took place on earth; the most wonderful sight that even hell ever beheld, and the most stupendous marvel that heaven itself ever executed – Jesus Christ, made sin for us, that we might be made the righteousness of God in Him! You scarcely need that I should explain the words when the sense is so plain. A spotless Savior stands in the room of guilty sinners. God lays upon the spotless Savior the sin of the guilty, so that He becomes, in the expressive language of the text, sin. Then He takes off from the innocent Savior His righteousness, and puts that to the account of the once-guilty sinners, so that the sinners become righteousness – righteousness of the highest and divinest source, the righteousness of God in Christ Jesus.

Reference:   Sermon 3203, Christ Made Sin, 2 Corinthians 5:21.


162.
The iron bolt which so mysteriously fastens the door of hope and holds our spirits in gloomy prison, needs a heavenly hand to push it back.

The iron bolt which so mysteriously fastens the door of hope and holds our spirits in gloomy prison, needs a heavenly hand to push it back.

Reference:  


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Depression
163.
To bring His chosen [people] to eternal happiness was the high ambition which inspired [Jesus Christ], and made Him wade through a sea of blood.

To bring His chosen [people] to eternal happiness was the high ambition which inspired [Jesus Christ], and made Him wade through a sea of blood.

Reference:   Treasury of David, Commentary on Psalm 16:11.


164.
This is noble encouragement to all the saints; die they must, but rise they shall, and though in their case they shall see corruption, yet they shall rise to everlasting life. Christ’s resurrection is the cause, the earnest, the guarantee, and the emblem of the rising of all His people. Let them, therefore, go to their graves as to their beds, resting their flesh among the clods as they now do upon their couches.

This is noble encouragement to all the saints; die they must, but rise they shall, and though in their case they shall see corruption, yet they shall rise to everlasting life. Christ's resurrection is the cause, the earnest, the guarantee, and the emblem of the rising of all His people. Let them, therefore, go to their graves as to their beds, resting their flesh among the clods as they now do upon their couches.

Reference:   Treasury of David, Commentary for Psalm 16:10.


165.
Jesus, the good shepherd, will not travel at such a rate as to overdrive the lambs. He has tender consideration for the poor and needy. Kings usually look to the interests of the great and the rich, but in the kingdom of our Great Shepherd He cares most for the poor… The weaklings and the sickly of the flock are the special objects of the Savior’s care… You think, dear heart, that you are forgotten, because of your nothingness and weakness and poverty. This is the very reason you are remembered.

Jesus, the good shepherd, will not travel at such a rate as to overdrive the lambs. He has tender consideration for the poor and needy. Kings usually look to the interests of the great and the rich, but in the kingdom of our Great Shepherd He cares most for the poor... The weaklings and the sickly of the flock are the special objects of the Savior’s care... You think, dear heart, that you are forgotten, because of your nothingness and weakness and poverty. This is the very reason you are remembered.

Reference:   Treasury of the Old Testament, III:575-576.


166.
The gospel is preached in the ears of all; it only comes with power to some. The power that is in the gospel does not lie in the eloquence of the preacher; otherwise men would be converters of souls. Nor does it lie in the preacher’s learning; otherwise it would consist in the wisdom of men. We might preach till our tongues rotted, till we should exhaust our lungs and die, but never a soul would be converted unless there were mysterious power going with it – the Holy Ghost changing the will of man. O Sirs! We might as well preach to stone walls as to preach to humanity unless the Holy Ghost be with the Word, to give it power to convert the soul.

The gospel is preached in the ears of all; it only comes with power to some. The power that is in the gospel does not lie in the eloquence of the preacher; otherwise men would be converters of souls. Nor does it lie in the preacher's learning; otherwise it would consist in the wisdom of men. We might preach till our tongues rotted, till we should exhaust our lungs and die, but never a soul would be converted unless there were mysterious power going with it - the Holy Ghost changing the will of man. O Sirs! We might as well preach to stone walls as to preach to humanity unless the Holy Ghost be with the Word, to give it power to convert the soul.


167.
Oh, you are not dealing with trifles when you are dealing with the love of God to you. It is not a spare corner of the heart of God that He gives to you, as you may give a little love to the criminals in the jails, but the great, inconceivably vast heart of God belongs as much to every Christian as if there were not another being in the world for God to love! Even as Jehovah loves His Only-begotten, so does He love each one of His children.

Oh, you are not dealing with trifles when you are dealing with the love of God to you. It is not a spare corner of the heart of God that He gives to you, as you may give a little love to the criminals in the jails, but the great, inconceivably vast heart of God belongs as much to every Christian as if there were not another being in the world for God to love! Even as Jehovah loves His Only-begotten, so does He love each one of His children.

Reference:   The Treasury of the Old Testament, III:568.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: God-Love
168.
The grandest era in the world’s history was ushered in by nobodies, by persons who, like their Leader, were despised and rejected of men.

The grandest era in the world’s history was ushered in by nobodies, by persons who, like their Leader, were despised and rejected of men.

Reference:   The Treasury of the New Testament, 1:793.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Apostles
169.
Mark well, that the desire I have spoken of must be thoroughly disinterested. If a man can detect, after the most earnest self-examination, any other motive than the glory of God and the good of souls in his seeking the [pastorate], he better turn aside from it at once; for the Lord will abhor the bringing of buyers and sellers into his temple: the introduction of anything mercenary, even in the smallest degree, will be like the fly in the pot of ointment, and will spoil it all.

Mark well, that the desire I have spoken of must be thoroughly disinterested. If a man can detect, after the most earnest self-examination, any other motive than the glory of God and the good of souls in his seeking the [pastorate], he better turn aside from it at once; for the Lord will abhor the bringing of buyers and sellers into his temple: the introduction of anything mercenary, even in the smallest degree, will be like the fly in the pot of ointment, and will spoil it all.

Reference:   Lectures to My Students, 1875.


170.
Churches are not all wise, neither do they all judge in the power of the Holy Ghost, but many of them judge after the flesh; yet I had sooner accept the opinion of a company of the Lord’s people than my own upon so personal a subject as my own gifts and graces. At any rate, whether you value the verdict of the church or no, one thing is certain, that none of you can be pastors without the loving consent of the flock; and therefore this will be to you a practical indicator if not a correct one.

Churches are not all wise, neither do they all judge in the power of the Holy Ghost, but many of them judge after the flesh; yet I had sooner accept the opinion of a company of the Lord’s people than my own upon so personal a subject as my own gifts and graces. At any rate, whether you value the verdict of the church or no, one thing is certain, that none of you can be pastors without the loving consent of the flock; and therefore this will be to you a practical indicator if not a correct one.

Reference:   Lectures to My Students, 1875.


171.
I should not complete this point if I did not add, that mere ability to edify, and aptness to teach is not enough; there must be other talents to complete the pastoral character. Sound judgment and solid experience must instruct you; gentle manners and loving affections must sway you; firmness and courage must be manifest and tenderness and sympathy must not be lacking. Gifts administrative in ruling well will be as requisite as gifts instructive in teaching well.

I should not complete this point if I did not add, that mere ability to edify, and aptness to teach is not enough; there must be other talents to complete the pastoral character. Sound judgment and solid experience must instruct you; gentle manners and loving affections must sway you; firmness and courage must be manifest and tenderness and sympathy must not be lacking. Gifts administrative in ruling well will be as requisite as gifts instructive in teaching well.

Reference:   Lectures to My Students, 1875.


172.
How may a young man know whether he is called or not? That is a weighty inquiry, and I desire to treat it most solemnly. O for divine guidance in so doing! That hundreds have missed their way, and stumbled against a pulpit is sorrowfully evident from the fruitless ministries and decaying churches which surround us. It is a fearful calamity to a man to miss his calling, and to the church upon whom he imposes himself, his mistake involves an affliction of the most grievous kind.

How may a young man know whether he is called or not? That is a weighty inquiry, and I desire to treat it most solemnly. O for divine guidance in so doing! That hundreds have missed their way, and stumbled against a pulpit is sorrowfully evident from the fruitless ministries and decaying churches which surround us. It is a fearful calamity to a man to miss his calling, and to the church upon whom he imposes himself, his mistake involves an affliction of the most grievous kind.

Reference:   Lectures to My Students, 1875.


173.
You might as well expect to raise the dead by whispering in their ears, as hope to save souls by preaching to them, if it were not for the agency of the Spirit.

You might as well expect to raise the dead by whispering in their ears, as hope to save souls by preaching to them, if it were not for the agency of the Spirit.

Reference:   Preaching-Effectiveness


174.
If we cannot prevail with men for God, we will, at least, endeavour to prevail with God for men. We cannot save them, or even persuade them to be saved, but we can at least bewail their madness and entreat the interference of the Lord.

If we cannot prevail with men for God, we will, at least, endeavour to prevail with God for men. We cannot save them, or even persuade them to be saved, but we can at least bewail their madness and entreat the interference of the Lord.

Reference:   Lecturers to My Students, Lesson 3, The Preacher's Private Prayer.


175.
Prayer will singularly assist you in the delivery of your sermon; in fact, nothing can so gloriously fit you to preach as descending fresh from the mount of communion with God to speak with men. None are so able to plead with men as those who have been wrestling with God on their behalf.

Prayer will singularly assist you in the delivery of your sermon; in fact, nothing can so gloriously fit you to preach as descending fresh from the mount of communion with God to speak with men. None are so able to plead with men as those who have been wrestling with God on their behalf.

Reference:   Lecturers to My Students, Lesson 3, The Preacher's Private Prayer.


176.
Nothing can so gloriously fit you to preach as descending fresh from the mount of communion with God to speak with men. None are so able to plead with men as those who have been wrestling with God on their behalf.

Nothing can so gloriously fit you to preach as descending fresh from the mount of communion with God to speak with men. None are so able to plead with men as those who have been wrestling with God on their behalf.

Reference:   Lecturers to My Students, Lesson 3, The Preacher's Private Prayer.


177.
Texts will often refuse to reveal their treasures till you open them with the key of prayer.

Texts will often refuse to reveal their treasures till you open them with the key of prayer.

Reference:   Lecturers to My Students, Lesson 3, The Preacher's Private Prayer.


178.
The minister who does not earnestly pray over his work must surely be a vain and conceited man.  He acts as if he thought himself sufficient of himself, and therefore needed not to appeal to God

The minister who does not earnestly pray over his work must surely be a vain and conceited man. He acts as if he thought himself sufficient of himself, and therefore needed not to appeal to God

Reference:   Lecturers to My Students, Lesson 3, The Preacher's Private Prayer.


179.
It is blessed to eat into the very soul of the Bible until at last you come to talk in scriptural language and your spirit is flavored with the words of the Lord.

It is blessed to eat into the very soul of the Bible until at last you come to talk in scriptural language and your spirit is flavored with the words of the Lord.


180.
Care more for a grain of faith than a ton of excitement.

Care more for a grain of faith than a ton of excitement.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Faith-Advice
181.
Serve God with all your might while the candle is burning, and then when it goes out for a season, you will have the less to regret.

Serve God with all your might while the candle is burning, and then when it goes out for a season, you will have the less to regret.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Service-Effort
182.
Oh, there is, in contemplating Christ, a balm for every wound! In musing on the Father, there is a quietus for every grief and in the influence of the Holy Spirit there is a balsam for every sore. Would you lose your sorrows? Would you drown your cares? Then go plunge yourself in the Godhead’s deepest sea; be lost in His immensity; and you shall come forth as from a couch of rest, refreshed and invigorated. I know nothing which can so comfort the soul, so calm the swelling billows of grief and sorrow; so speak peace to the winds of trial, as a devout musing upon the subject of the Godhead.

Oh, there is, in contemplating Christ, a balm for every wound! In musing on the Father, there is a quietus for every grief and in the influence of the Holy Spirit there is a balsam for every sore. Would you lose your sorrows? Would you drown your cares? Then go plunge yourself in the Godhead’s deepest sea; be lost in His immensity; and you shall come forth as from a couch of rest, refreshed and invigorated. I know nothing which can so comfort the soul, so calm the swelling billows of grief and sorrow; so speak peace to the winds of trial, as a devout musing upon the subject of the Godhead.


183.
Feast, Christians, feast; you have a right to feast… But in your feasting, think of the Man in Bethlehem. Let Him have a place in your hearts, give Him the glory, think of the virgin who conceived Him, but think most of all of the Man born, the Child given. I finish by again saying, A happy Christmas to you all!

Feast, Christians, feast; you have a right to feast... But in your feasting, think of the Man in Bethlehem. Let Him have a place in your hearts, give Him the glory, think of the virgin who conceived Him, but think most of all of the Man born, the Child given. I finish by again saying, A happy Christmas to you all!

Reference:   The Treasury of the Old Testament, III:430.


184.
Do not be afraid, dear children of God, you that have fallen into a mournful state, do not be afraid to cry out to God. I know we sometimes feel as if we must not and dare not pray. We have become so dull, so lifeless, so unworthy, that we do not expect to be heard, and feel as if it would be presumption to cry. But our heavenly Father loves to hear his children cry all day long… If you can cry out to Jesus, he will joyfully hear you. If you will give him no rest, he will give you all the rest you need. The Lord finds music in his children’s cries.

Do not be afraid, dear children of God, you that have fallen into a mournful state, do not be afraid to cry out to God. I know we sometimes feel as if we must not and dare not pray. We have become so dull, so lifeless, so unworthy, that we do not expect to be heard, and feel as if it would be presumption to cry. But our heavenly Father loves to hear his children cry all day long... If you can cry out to Jesus, he will joyfully hear you. If you will give him no rest, he will give you all the rest you need. The Lord finds music in his children’s cries.

Reference:   The Treasury of the Old Testament, II:663.


185.
And you may know whether it is the Spirit’s work by this.  Have you been led to Christ, and away from self? Have you been led away from all feelings, from all doings, from all willings, from all prayings, as the ground of your trust and your hope, and have you been brought nakedly to rely upon the finished work of Christ? If so, this is more than human nature ever taught any man. This is a height to which human nature never climbed. The Spirit of God has done that, and He will never leave what He has once begun.

And you may know whether it is the Spirit’s work by this. Have you been led to Christ, and away from self? Have you been led away from all feelings, from all doings, from all willings, from all prayings, as the ground of your trust and your hope, and have you been brought nakedly to rely upon the finished work of Christ? If so, this is more than human nature ever taught any man. This is a height to which human nature never climbed. The Spirit of God has done that, and He will never leave what He has once begun.


186.
I am one of the bookworms that have not got halfway into my Bible yet; but I am eating my way as fast as I can. This one thing I have proved to myself beyond all question; I shall never, never exhaust this precious book. Much less shall I exhaust the wondrous Person of my divinely-blessed Lord. He is that bread which came down from heaven. He is utterly inexhaustible.

I am one of the bookworms that have not got halfway into my Bible yet; but I am eating my way as fast as I can. This one thing I have proved to myself beyond all question; I shall never, never exhaust this precious book. Much less shall I exhaust the wondrous Person of my divinely-blessed Lord. He is that bread which came down from heaven. He is utterly inexhaustible.

Reference:   The Treasury of the New Testament, II:365.


187.
Remember that the man who truly repents is never satisfied with his own repentance. We can no more repent perfectly than we can live perfectly. However pure our tears, there will always be some dirt in them; there will be something to be repented of even in our best repentance. But listen! To repent is to change your mind about sin, and Christ, and all the great things of God. There is sorrow implied in this; but the main point is the turning of the heart from sin to Christ. If there be this turning, you have the essence of true repentance, even though no alarm and no despair should ever cast their shadow upon your mind.

Remember that the man who truly repents is never satisfied with his own repentance. We can no more repent perfectly than we can live perfectly. However pure our tears, there will always be some dirt in them; there will be something to be repented of even in our best repentance. But listen! To repent is to change your mind about sin, and Christ, and all the great things of God. There is sorrow implied in this; but the main point is the turning of the heart from sin to Christ. If there be this turning, you have the essence of true repentance, even though no alarm and no despair should ever cast their shadow upon your mind.

Reference:   All Of Grace


188.
Faith is believing that Christ is what He is said to be, and that He will do what He has promised to do, and then to expect this of Him.

Faith is believing that Christ is what He is said to be, and that He will do what He has promised to do, and then to expect this of Him.

Reference:   All of Grace.


189.
There is no attribute more comforting to His children than that of God’s Sovereignty. Under the most adverse circumstances, in the most severe trials, they believe that Sovereignty has ordained their afflictions, that Sovereignty overrules them, and that Sovereignty will sanctify them all. There is nothing for which the children ought more earnestly to contend than the doctrine of their Master over all creation – the Kingship of God over all the works of His own hands – the Throne of God and His right to sit upon that Throne. On the other hand, there is no doctrine more hated by worldings, no truth of which they have made such a football, as the great, stupendous, but yet most certain doctrine of the Sovereignty of the infinite Jehovah. Men will allow God to be everywhere except on His throne. They will allow Him to be in His workshop to fashion worlds and make stars. They will allow Him to be in His almonry to dispense His alms and bestow His bounties. They will allow Him to sustain the earth and bear up the pillars thereof, or light the lamps of heaven, or rule the waves of the ever-moving ocean; but when God ascends His throne, His creatures then gnash their teeth, and [when] we proclaim an enthroned God, and His right to do as He wills with His own, to dispose of His creatures as He thinks well, without consulting them in the matter; then it is that we are hissed and execrated, and then it is that men turn a deaf ear to us, for God on His throne is not the God they love. But it is God upon the throne that we love to preach.  It is God upon His throne whom we trust.

There is no attribute more comforting to His children than that of God's Sovereignty. Under the most adverse circumstances, in the most severe trials, they believe that Sovereignty has ordained their afflictions, that Sovereignty overrules them, and that Sovereignty will sanctify them all. There is nothing for which the children ought more earnestly to contend than the doctrine of their Master over all creation – the Kingship of God over all the works of His own hands – the Throne of God and His right to sit upon that Throne. On the other hand, there is no doctrine more hated by worldings, no truth of which they have made such a football, as the great, stupendous, but yet most certain doctrine of the Sovereignty of the infinite Jehovah. Men will allow God to be everywhere except on His throne. They will allow Him to be in His workshop to fashion worlds and make stars. They will allow Him to be in His almonry to dispense His alms and bestow His bounties. They will allow Him to sustain the earth and bear up the pillars thereof, or light the lamps of heaven, or rule the waves of the ever-moving ocean; but when God ascends His throne, His creatures then gnash their teeth, and [when] we proclaim an enthroned God, and His right to do as He wills with His own, to dispose of His creatures as He thinks well, without consulting them in the matter; then it is that we are hissed and execrated, and then it is that men turn a deaf ear to us, for God on His throne is not the God they love. But it is God upon the throne that we love to preach. It is God upon His throne whom we trust.

Reference:   Sermon on Matthew 20:15.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Trials-God_from
190.
In math, if you divide an infinite number by any number, no matter how large, you still have an infinite quotient. So Jesus’ love, being infinite, even though it is divided up for every person on earth, is still infinitely poured out on each one of us!

In math, if you divide an infinite number by any number, no matter how large, you still have an infinite quotient. So Jesus' love, being infinite, even though it is divided up for every person on earth, is still infinitely poured out on each one of us!


191.
The heart of Christ became like a reservoir in the midst of the mountains. All the tributary streams of iniquity, and every drop of the sins of His people, ran down and gathered into one vast lake, deep as hell and shoreless as eternity. All these met, as it were, in Christ’s heart, and He endured them all.

The heart of Christ became like a reservoir in the midst of the mountains. All the tributary streams of iniquity, and every drop of the sins of His people, ran down and gathered into one vast lake, deep as hell and shoreless as eternity. All these met, as it were, in Christ's heart, and He endured them all.

Reference:   Christian History, n. 29.


192.
We may expect answers to prayer, and should not be easy without them any more than we should be if we had written a letter to a friend upon important business, and had received no reply.

We may expect answers to prayer, and should not be easy without them any more than we should be if we had written a letter to a friend upon important business, and had received no reply.

Reference:   Exposition of Psalm 27.


193.
In all states of dilemma or of difficulty, prayer is an available source. The ship of prayer may sail through all temptations, doubts and fears, straight up to the throne of God; and though she may be outward bound with only griefs, and groans, and sighs, she shall return freighted with a wealth of blessings!

In all states of dilemma or of difficulty, prayer is an available source. The ship of prayer may sail through all temptations, doubts and fears, straight up to the throne of God; and though she may be outward bound with only griefs, and groans, and sighs, she shall return freighted with a wealth of blessings!


194.
The church is not perfect, but woe to the man who finds pleasure in pointing out her imperfections! Christ loved his church, and let us do the same. I have no doubt that the Lord can see more fault in his church than I can; and I have equal confidence that he sees no fault at all. Because he covers her faults with his own love-that love which covers a multitude of sins; and he removes all her defilement with that precious blood which washes away all the transgressions of his people.

The church is not perfect, but woe to the man who finds pleasure in pointing out her imperfections! Christ loved his church, and let us do the same. I have no doubt that the Lord can see more fault in his church than I can; and I have equal confidence that he sees no fault at all. Because he covers her faults with his own love-that love which covers a multitude of sins; and he removes all her defilement with that precious blood which washes away all the transgressions of his people.


195.
Remember, Christ’s scholars must study upon their knees.

Remember, Christ’s scholars must study upon their knees.


196.
I could no more doubt the power of prayer than I could disbelieve the law of gravity.

I could no more doubt the power of prayer than I could disbelieve the law of gravity.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Prayer-Power
197.
Methinks every true Christian should be exceedingly earnest in prayer concerning the souls of the ungodly; and when they are so, how abundantly God blesses them and how the church prospers!

Methinks every true Christian should be exceedingly earnest in prayer concerning the souls of the ungodly; and when they are so, how abundantly God blesses them and how the church prospers!

Reference:   Autobiography, 1:329.


198.
True prayer is measured by weight, not by length. A single groan before God may have more fullness of prayer in it than a fine oration of great length.

True prayer is measured by weight, not by length. A single groan before God may have more fullness of prayer in it than a fine oration of great length.


Author: C.H. Spurgeon
Topics: Prayer-Time
199.
The greatest enemy to human souls is the self-righteous spirit which makes men look to themselves for salvation.

The greatest enemy to human souls is the self-righteous spirit which makes men look to themselves for salvation.


200.
Self-righteousness exclaims, “I will not be saved in God’s way; I will make a new road to heaven; I will not bow before God’s grace; I will not accept the atonement which God has wrought out in the person of Jesus; I will be my own redeemer; I will enter heaven by my own strength, and glorify my own merits.” The Lord is very wroth against self-righteousness. I do not know of anything against which His fury burneth more than against this, because this touches Him in a very tender point, it insults the glory and honor of His Son Jesus Christ.

Self-righteousness exclaims, “I will not be saved in God's way; I will make a new road to heaven; I will not bow before God’s grace; I will not accept the atonement which God has wrought out in the person of Jesus; I will be my own redeemer; I will enter heaven by my own strength, and glorify my own merits.” The Lord is very wroth against self-righteousness. I do not know of anything against which His fury burneth more than against this, because this touches Him in a very tender point, it insults the glory and honor of His Son Jesus Christ.

Reference:   A Jealous God, Sermon 502, March 29, 1863.