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Quotes for Topic: Missions-perspectives

1.
God is made to appear frustrated by much modern preaching. This happens in missionary appeals. The idea is left that God needs our help. We are not told that He graciously offers us the opportunity to take part in the great missionary enterprise. No, things have gone much beyond that; in fact, they have gotten out of hand. There may have been a time when God could have made such an offer, but that time is long past. Things are now desperate. A great deal that should have been done for God’s cause has not been done. And God is rushing around to make up for lost time. His love has worked Him into a corner, and He needs us to get Him out of it.

God is made to appear frustrated by much modern preaching. This happens in missionary appeals. The idea is left that God needs our help. We are not told that He graciously offers us the opportunity to take part in the great missionary enterprise. No, things have gone much beyond that; in fact, they have gotten out of hand. There may have been a time when God could have made such an offer, but that time is long past. Things are now desperate. A great deal that should have been done for God’s cause has not been done. And God is rushing around to make up for lost time. His love has worked Him into a corner, and He needs us to get Him out of it.

Reference:  Quoted in: Tom Wells, A Vision for Missions, Permission by The Banner of Truth Trust, Carlisle, PA. p. 39. Get this book!


2.
[God] may direct some to leave their homeland to go to proclaim the Gospel in a foreign land. There is a great temptation in such circumstances for people to revert to the legalism of thinking that they are being heroes for God because they are leaving their homeland to endure the rigors of living in a foreign land. Those who are directed to do hard jobs for God must remind themselves that these rigors are simply for their health. As these difficulties help them become more like Christ, they will sing a song of praise unto God, and as a result “many will see it and fear and put their trust in the Lord” (Psm. 40:3). People who regard themselves as invalids rather than heroes will make excellent missionaries.

[God] may direct some to leave their homeland to go to proclaim the Gospel in a foreign land. There is a great temptation in such circumstances for people to revert to the legalism of thinking that they are being heroes for God because they are leaving their homeland to endure the rigors of living in a foreign land. Those who are directed to do hard jobs for God must remind themselves that these rigors are simply for their health. As these difficulties help them become more like Christ, they will sing a song of praise unto God, and as a result “many will see it and fear and put their trust in the Lord” (Psm. 40:3). People who regard themselves as invalids rather than heroes will make excellent missionaries.

Reference:  Gospel and Law: Contrast or Continuum? Eerdmans, 1980, p. 119.


3.
God alone knows the definition of terms [here]. I cannot precisely define who all the nations are, but I do not need to know. I know only one thing: Christ has not yet returned; therefore, the task is not yet done. When it is done, Christ will come. Our responsibility is not to insist on defining the terms; our responsibility is to complete the task. So long as Christ does not return, our work is undone. Let us get busy and complete our mission.

God alone knows the definition of terms [here]. I cannot precisely define who all the nations are, but I do not need to know. I know only one thing: Christ has not yet returned; therefore, the task is not yet done. When it is done, Christ will come. Our responsibility is not to insist on defining the terms; our responsibility is to complete the task. So long as Christ does not return, our work is undone. Let us get busy and complete our mission.

Reference:  Secret Church 2015.


4.
Love is the root of missions; sacrifice is the fruit of missions.

Love is the root of missions; sacrifice is the fruit of missions (Roderick Davis).


5.
I fear that if annihilationism is widely accepted by Christians, that will hinder the missionary enterprise. Many people have devoted their lives to bringing the gospel to the unsaved around the globe. Would they continue to do so if they really thought that the worst fate awaiting those who reject Jesus is final extinction? I seriously doubt it. Annihilationists can argue that the obliteration of the wicked is a terrible fate if measured against the bliss of the righteous. But when compared to suffering in hell forever, it is simply not that bad to cease to exist.

I fear that if annihilationism is widely accepted by Christians, that will hinder the missionary enterprise. Many people have devoted their lives to bringing the gospel to the unsaved around the globe. Would they continue to do so if they really thought that the worst fate awaiting those who reject Jesus is final extinction? I seriously doubt it. Annihilationists can argue that the obliteration of the wicked is a terrible fate if measured against the bliss of the righteous. But when compared to suffering in hell forever, it is simply not that bad to cease to exist.

Reference:  Hell on Trial: The Case for Eternal Punishment, P&R Publishers, 1995, p. 170. Used by permission.