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Quotes for Topic: Christians-famous-puritans

1.
Owen did not revere himself as a master of Scripture but as a humble servant of it.  His devotion to the Word of God was in direct correlation to his devotion to God Himself.  Indeed, Owen was a man of God who served the church of God as a student of God’s Word.  To him we owe great respect, for he lived coram Deo, before the face of God, as a burning and shining light to the world.

Owen did not revere himself as a master of Scripture but as a humble servant of it. His devotion to the Word of God was in direct correlation to his devotion to God Himself. Indeed, Owen was a man of God who served the church of God as a student of God’s Word. To him we owe great respect, for he lived coram Deo, before the face of God, as a burning and shining light to the world.

Reference:  Theology in Perspective, Tabletalk, Oct. 2004, p. 2, Used by Permission.


2.
It was his great design to promote holiness in the life and exercise of it among you… He was a burning and shining light, and you for a while rejoiced in his light. Alas! It was but for a while; but we may rejoice in it still.

It was his great design to promote holiness in the life and exercise of it among you... He was a burning and shining light, and you for a while rejoiced in his light. Alas! It was but for a while; but we may rejoice in it still.

Reference:  Cited in: A Burning and Shining Light, Tabletalk, Oct. 2004, p. 11, Used by Permission (Words spoken at the funeral of John Owen).


3.
The figure of John Owen (1616-1683) towers above – almost head and shoulders above – the galaxy of writers we know collectively as the English Puritans. His theological learning and acumen was unrivalled; his sense of the importance of doctrine for living was profound.

The figure of John Owen (1616-1683) towers above – almost head and shoulders above – the galaxy of writers we know collectively as the English Puritans. His theological learning and acumen was unrivalled; his sense of the importance of doctrine for living was profound.

Reference:  Theologian of the Spirit, Tabletalk, Oct. 2004, p. 16, Used by Permission.


4.
If light reading is our passion, then Owen’s prose style is not for us.  His paragraphs are tightly packed; his thoughts demanding.  His analysis of the heart cannot be skimmed quickly.  But in our age of constant and instant upgrade to faster models, this is exactly what many of us need:  a slow read, a careful application- allowing ourselves to feel the wounds made by Owen’s sensitive eye surgery, and, as a result, discovering that we see our God more clearly, that we love his Son more fully and serve Him in the power of the Spirit more thoroughly.  If this is what we need – as it surely is – Owen, though dead, still speaks, and in providence of God is still there to help and guide us.

If light reading is our passion, then Owen’s prose style is not for us. His paragraphs are tightly packed; his thoughts demanding. His analysis of the heart cannot be skimmed quickly. But in our age of constant and instant upgrade to faster models, this is exactly what many of us need: a slow read, a careful application- allowing ourselves to feel the wounds made by Owen’s sensitive eye surgery, and, as a result, discovering that we see our God more clearly, that we love his Son more fully and serve Him in the power of the Spirit more thoroughly. If this is what we need - as it surely is - Owen, though dead, still speaks, and in providence of God is still there to help and guide us.

Reference:  Theologian of the Spirit, Tabletalk, Oct. 2004, p. 18, Used by Permission.