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Quotes of Author: Simon-kistemaker

1.
In respect to the consumption of wine, both the Old and New Testaments nowhere prescribe total abstinence. Only those bound by the Nazirite vow (Num. 6:3-4) and a few others are told to abstain (Lev. 10:9; Jer. 35:6, 8, 14; Eze. 44:21). The Scriptures, however, denounce the drunkard and warn him about the spiritual consequences of his intemperance.

In respect to the consumption of wine, both the Old and New Testaments nowhere prescribe total abstinence. Only those bound by the Nazirite vow (Num. 6:3-4) and a few others are told to abstain (Lev. 10:9; Jer. 35:6, 8, 14; Eze. 44:21). The Scriptures, however, denounce the drunkard and warn him about the spiritual consequences of his intemperance.

Reference:   1 Corinthians, Baker, 1993, p. 170.


Topics: Alcohol
2.
Every time someone comes to [God] with a request, He opens His treasury and freely distributes wisdom. Just as the sun continues to give light, so God keeps on giving wisdom. We cannot imagine a sun that fails to give light; much less can we think of God failing to give wisdom. God’s gift is free, without interest, and without the request to pay it back [see James 1:5].

Every time someone comes to [God] with a request, He opens His treasury and freely distributes wisdom. Just as the sun continues to give light, so God keeps on giving wisdom. We cannot imagine a sun that fails to give light; much less can we think of God failing to give wisdom. God’s gift is free, without interest, and without the request to pay it back [see James 1:5].

Reference:   James, Baker, 1986, p. 38.


3.
Churches whose spiritual and historical roots are in the Reformation period of the sixteenth century have edifices for worship that are simple and seemingly empty.  Apart from pulpit, pews, a baptismal font or baptistry, and a communion table, the building is empty.  True, but on the pulpit in full view of any worshiper is the open Bible.  The people worship God by receiving and responding to the proclamation of the Word.  They worship not the Word but God who is addressing them through the Scriptures.

Churches whose spiritual and historical roots are in the Reformation period of the sixteenth century have edifices for worship that are simple and seemingly empty.  Apart from pulpit, pews, a baptismal font or baptistry, and a communion table, the building is empty.  True, but on the pulpit in full view of any worshiper is the open Bible.  The people worship God by receiving and responding to the proclamation of the Word.  They worship not the Word but God who is addressing them through the Scriptures.

Reference:   1 Corinthians, Baker, 1993, p. 118.


Topics: Bible-Church