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Quotes of Author: Sam-storms

1.
[In John 3:16] this love is infinitely majestic because God, as holy, has loved the world, as sinful! What strikes us is that God who is righteous loves the world which is unrighteous. This text takes root in our hearts because it declares that He who dwells in unapproachable light has deigned to enter the realm of darkness; that He who is just has given Himself for the unjust (1 Peter 3:18); that He who is altogether glorious and desirable has suffered endless shame for detestable and repugnant creatures, who apart from His grace respond only with hell-deserving hostility!

[In John 3:16] this love is infinitely majestic because God, as holy, has loved the world, as sinful! What strikes us is that God who is righteous loves the world which is unrighteous. This text takes root in our hearts because it declares that He who dwells in unapproachable light has deigned to enter the realm of darkness; that He who is just has given Himself for the unjust (1 Peter 3:18); that He who is altogether glorious and desirable has suffered endless shame for detestable and repugnant creatures, who apart from His grace respond only with hell-deserving hostility!

Reference:   The Love of God, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Love
2.
This love of God is clearly the source or cause of the atoning work of Christ. God does not love men because Christ died for them, Christ died for them because God loved them. The death of the Savior is not to be conceived as restoring in people something on the basis of which we might then win God’s love. The sacrifice of Christ does not procure God’s affection, as if it were necessary, through His sufferings, to extract love from an otherwise stern, unwilling, reluctant Deity. On the contrary, God’s love constrains to the death of Christ and is supremely manifested therein.

This love of God is clearly the source or cause of the atoning work of Christ. God does not love men because Christ died for them, Christ died for them because God loved them. The death of the Savior is not to be conceived as restoring in people something on the basis of which we might then win God's love. The sacrifice of Christ does not procure God's affection, as if it were necessary, through His sufferings, to extract love from an otherwise stern, unwilling, reluctant Deity. On the contrary, God's love constrains to the death of Christ and is supremely manifested therein.  

Reference:   The Love of God, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Love
3.
All those dying in infancy, as well as those so mentally incapacitated that they are incapable of making an informed choice, are among the elect of God chosen by Him for salvation before the world began. The evidence for this view is scant, but significant. 1. In Romans 1:20 Paul describes people who are recipients of general revelation as being, “without excuse.” Does this imply that those who are not recipients of general revelation (i.e., infants) are therefore not accountable to God or subject to wrath? In other words, those who die in infancy have an “;excuse” in that they neither receive general revelation nor have the capacity to respond to it. 2. There are texts which appear to assert or imply that infants do not know good or evil and hence lack the capacity to make morally informed and thus responsible choices. According to Deuteronomy 1:39 they are said to “have no knowledge of good or evil.” 3. The story of David’s son in 2 Samuel 12:15-23 (esp. v. 23)… What does it mean when David says “I shall go to him?” If this is merely a reference to the grave or death, in the sense that David, too, shall one day die and be buried, one wonders why he would say something so patently obvious! Also, it appears that David draws some measure of comfort from knowing that he will “go to him.” It is the reason why David resumes the normal routine of life. It appears to be the reason David ceases from the outward display of grief. It appears to be a truth from which David derives comfort and encouragement. How could any of this be true if David will simply die like his son? It would, therefore, appear that David believed he would be reunited with his deceased infant. 4. There is consistent testimony of Scripture that people are judged on the basis of sins voluntary and consciously committed in the body. See 2 Corinthians 5:10; 1 Corinthians 6:9-10; Revelation 20:11-12. In other words, eternal judgment is always based on conscious rejection of divine revelation (whether in creation, conscience, or Christ) and willful disobedience. Are infants capable of either? There is no explicit account in Scripture of any other judgment based on any other grounds. Thus, those dying in infancy are saved because they do not (cannot) satisfy the conditions for divine judgment. 5. We have what would appear to be clear biblical evidence that at least some infants are regenerate in the womb, such that if they had died in their infancy they would be saved. This at least provides a theoretical basis for considering whether the same may be true of all who die in infancy. These texts include Jeremiah 1:5; Luke 1:15. 6. Some have appealed to Matthew 19:13-15 (Mark 10:13-16; Luke 18:15-17) where Jesus declares, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.” Is Jesus simply saying that if one wishes to be saved he/she must be as trusting as children, i.e., devoid of skepticism and arrogance? In other words, is Jesus merely describing the kind of people who enter the kingdom? Or is he saying that these very children were recipients of saving grace? 7. Given our understanding of the character of God as presented in Scripture, does He appear as the kind of God who would eternally condemn infants on no other ground than that of Adam’s transgression? Admittedly, this is a subjective (and perhaps sentimental) question. But it deserves an answer, nonetheless.

All those dying in infancy, as well as those so mentally incapacitated that they are incapable of making an informed choice, are among the elect of God chosen by Him for salvation before the world began. The evidence for this view is scant, but significant. 1. In Romans 1:20 Paul describes people who are recipients of general revelation as being, “without excuse.” Does this imply that those who are not recipients of general revelation (i.e., infants) are therefore not accountable to God or subject to wrath? In other words, those who die in infancy have an “;excuse” in that they neither receive general revelation nor have the capacity to respond to it. 2. There are texts which appear to assert or imply that infants do not know good or evil and hence lack the capacity to make morally informed and thus responsible choices. According to Deuteronomy 1:39 they are said to “have no knowledge of good or evil.” 3. The story of David's son in 2 Samuel 12:15-23 (esp. v. 23)… What does it mean when David says “I shall go to him?” If this is merely a reference to the grave or death, in the sense that David, too, shall one day die and be buried, one wonders why he would say something so patently obvious! Also, it appears that David draws some measure of comfort from knowing that he will "go to him." It is the reason why David resumes the normal routine of life. It appears to be the reason David ceases from the outward display of grief. It appears to be a truth from which David derives comfort and encouragement. How could any of this be true if David will simply die like his son? It would, therefore, appear that David believed he would be reunited with his deceased infant. 4. There is consistent testimony of Scripture that people are judged on the basis of sins voluntary and consciously committed in the body. See 2 Corinthians 5:10; 1 Corinthians 6:9-10; Revelation 20:11-12. In other words, eternal judgment is always based on conscious rejection of divine revelation (whether in creation, conscience, or Christ) and willful disobedience. Are infants capable of either? There is no explicit account in Scripture of any other judgment based on any other grounds. Thus, those dying in infancy are saved because they do not (cannot) satisfy the conditions for divine judgment. 5. We have what would appear to be clear biblical evidence that at least some infants are regenerate in the womb, such that if they had died in their infancy they would be saved. This at least provides a theoretical basis for considering whether the same may be true of all who die in infancy. These texts include Jeremiah 1:5; Luke 1:15. 6. Some have appealed to Matthew 19:13-15 (Mark 10:13-16; Luke 18:15-17) where Jesus declares, “Let the little children come to me, and do not hinder them, for the kingdom of heaven belongs to such as these.” Is Jesus simply saying that if one wishes to be saved he/she must be as trusting as children, i.e., devoid of skepticism and arrogance? In other words, is Jesus merely describing the kind of people who enter the kingdom? Or is he saying that these very children were recipients of saving grace? 7. Given our understanding of the character of God as presented in Scripture, does He appear as the kind of God who would eternally condemn infants on no other ground than that of Adam's transgression? Admittedly, this is a subjective (and perhaps sentimental) question. But it deserves an answer, nonetheless.

Reference:   Excerpted from: Are Those Who Died in Infancy Saved? November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
4.
Summary of Principles for Christian Stewardship: 1. Giving is to be in proportion to wealth – 1 Cor. 16:2; 2 Cor. 8:3, 11, 12; 9:8-11 (precisely what percentage that might be is never stated by Paul). 2. Giving is to be regarded as a privilege; indeed, it is an act of worship and praise – 2 Cor. 8:4; Phil. 4:15-18. 3. Giving is to be voluntary, not forced – 2 Cor. 8:3,11-12; 9:5,7. 4. Giving is to be preceded by the dedication of oneself to the Lord’s work in whatever capacity possible – 2 Cor. 8:5. 5. Giving is to be characterized by a spirit of reciprocity – 2 Cor. 8:13-15. 6. The administration of Christian giving should take into consideration the principles [of integrity] that governed Paul’s approach to the collection [he assembled] – 2 Cor. 8:16-24. 7. Giving is to be characterized by forethought and prayer – 2 Cor. 9:7. 8. Giving must never be characterized by sorrow over money lost or by covetousness – 2 Cor. 9:5, 7. 9. Giving should always be cheerful and joyous – 2 Cor. 9:7. 10. Giving should not be undertaken with a view to personal enrichment; rather, one should give with the expectation that God will supply the giver with abundance for additional giving – 2 Cor. 9:8-11. 11. All giving is to be understood as finding its source, power, and pattern in the grace of God in Christ – 2 Cor. 8:1,9; 9:14-15.

Summary of Principles for Christian Stewardship: 1. Giving is to be in proportion to wealth - 1 Cor. 16:2; 2 Cor. 8:3, 11, 12; 9:8-11 (precisely what percentage that might be is never stated by Paul). 2. Giving is to be regarded as a privilege; indeed, it is an act of worship and praise - 2 Cor. 8:4; Phil. 4:15-18. 3. Giving is to be voluntary, not forced - 2 Cor. 8:3,11-12; 9:5,7. 4. Giving is to be preceded by the dedication of oneself to the Lord's work in whatever capacity possible - 2 Cor. 8:5. 5. Giving is to be characterized by a spirit of reciprocity - 2 Cor. 8:13-15. 6. The administration of Christian giving should take into consideration the principles [of integrity] that governed Paul's approach to the collection [he assembled] - 2 Cor. 8:16-24. 7. Giving is to be characterized by forethought and prayer - 2 Cor. 9:7. 8. Giving must never be characterized by sorrow over money lost or by covetousness - 2 Cor. 9:5, 7. 9. Giving should always be cheerful and joyous - 2 Cor. 9:7. 10. Giving should not be undertaken with a view to personal enrichment; rather, one should give with the expectation that God will supply the giver with abundance for additional giving - 2 Cor. 9:8-11. 11. All giving is to be understood as finding its source, power, and pattern in the grace of God in Christ - 2 Cor. 8:1,9; 9:14-15.

Reference:   Comments from 2 Corinthians 9, November 6, 2006, Used by Permission.


5.
What is [special about] the New Covenant (Jer. 31:31-34; Ezek. 36:25-28)? 1. Internalization of God’s law (“I will put My law within them, and on their heart I will write it” Jer. 31:33a). 2. Unbroken fellowship with God (“I will be their God, and they shall be My people” Jer. 31:33b). 3. Unmediated knowledge of God (“And they shall not teach again, each man his neighbor and each man his brother, saying ‘Know the Lord,’ for they shall all know Me, from the least of them to the greatest of them” Jer. 33:34a). 4. Unconditional forgiveness of sins (“for I will forgive their iniquity, and their sin I will remember no more” Jer. 33:34b).

What is [special about] the New Covenant (Jer. 31:31-34; Ezek. 36:25-28)? 1. Internalization of God's law ("I will put My law within them, and on their heart I will write it" Jer. 31:33a). 2. Unbroken fellowship with God ("I will be their God, and they shall be My people" Jer. 31:33b). 3. Unmediated knowledge of God ("And they shall not teach again, each man his neighbor and each man his brother, saying 'Know the Lord,' for they shall all know Me, from the least of them to the greatest of them" Jer. 33:34a). 4. Unconditional forgiveness of sins ("for I will forgive their iniquity, and their sin I will remember no more" Jer. 33:34b).

Reference:   2 Corinthians 3:1-18, Excursus on the New Covenant, Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Covenant-New
6.
Reasons why church discipline is ignored or neglected? 1. Ignorance of biblical teaching on the subject (many believe that it is infrequently mentioned in Scripture and therefore unimportant; others are ignorant of the purpose of discipline and see it only as destroying the person). 2. Calloused, insensitivity toward sin (unsanctified mercy). 2. The spirit of individualism (“Am I my brother’s keeper?” Discipline is costly because my brother’s/sister’s business now becomes mine). 3. “Judge not, that ye be not judged” (misunderstanding and misapplication of Mt. 7:1-5). 4. Fear of rejection (i.e., fear of being told by the offending party: “Mind your own business. You have no authority to tell me what I can and can’t do”). 5. Fear of reprisal (lawsuits). 6. Dislike of confrontation (talking directly about personal sin with an offender is difficult; it makes us feel uneasy and uncomfortable; why rock the boat?). 7. Fear of driving the person away (especially if the offending person is a major financial contributor to the church). 8. Fear of church splits. 9. Preference for avoiding problems (just ignore it long enough and it will go away; time heals all). 10. False concept of discipline because of observed abuses (discipline is associated in the minds of many with heresy hunts, intolerance, oppression, harshness, mean-spiritedness, self-righteousness, legalism, etc.). 11. Belief that preaching alone will be a sufficient remedy. 12. Fear of being labeled a cult. 13. Fear of change (the power of tradition: “We’ve never done it before and we’ve done o.k. Why risk messing things up now?”).

Reasons why church discipline is ignored or neglected? 1. Ignorance of biblical teaching on the subject (many believe that it is infrequently mentioned in Scripture and therefore unimportant; others are ignorant of the purpose of discipline and see it only as destroying the person). 2. Calloused, insensitivity toward sin (unsanctified mercy). 2. The spirit of individualism ("Am I my brother's keeper?" Discipline is costly because my brother's/sister's business now becomes mine). 3. "Judge not, that ye be not judged" (misunderstanding and misapplication of Mt. 7:1-5). 4. Fear of rejection (i.e., fear of being told by the offending party: "Mind your own business. You have no authority to tell me what I can and can't do"). 5. Fear of reprisal (lawsuits). 6. Dislike of confrontation (talking directly about personal sin with an offender is difficult; it makes us feel uneasy and uncomfortable; why rock the boat?). 7. Fear of driving the person away (especially if the offending person is a major financial contributor to the church). 8. Fear of church splits. 9. Preference for avoiding problems (just ignore it long enough and it will go away; time heals all). 10. False concept of discipline because of observed abuses (discipline is associated in the minds of many with heresy hunts, intolerance, oppression, harshness, mean-spiritedness, self-righteousness, legalism, etc.). 11. Belief that preaching alone will be a sufficient remedy. 12. Fear of being labeled a cult. 13. Fear of change (the power of tradition: "We've never done it before and we've done o.k. Why risk messing things up now?").

Reference:   Special Study on Church Discipline, www.samstorms.com/all-articles/post/2-corinthians-2:5-11, Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
7.
Why is discipline necessary? 1. To maintain (as far as possible) the purity of the church (1 Cor. 3:17; Eph. 5:25-27). 2.  Because Scripture requires it (Mt. 18; 1 Cor. 5; etc.). 3.  In order to maintain a proper witness to the world; the church corporately, as with the elder individually, is “to have a good reputation with those outside the church” (1 Tim. 3:7). 4. To facilitate growth and to preserve unity in the body (Eph. 4:1-16). 5. To expose unbelievers (1 John 2:19). 6. To restore the erring brother/sister to obedience and fellowship (1 Cor. 5:5; 2 Cor. 2:6,7,10; Gal. 6:1; 2 Thes. 3:14-15). 7. To deter others (1 Tim. 5:20). 8. To avert corporate discipline (Rev. 2:14-25). 9. Because sin is rarely if ever an individual issue: it almost always has corporate ramifications (2 Cor. 2:5); the whole of the body (or at least a large segment of it) is adversely affected by the misdeeds of one member. 10. Evidently Paul believed that the willingness to embrace the task of discipline was a mark of maturity in a church’s corporate life (2 Cor. 2:9).

Why is discipline necessary? 1. To maintain (as far as possible) the purity of the church (1 Cor. 3:17; Eph. 5:25-27). 2. Because Scripture requires it (Mt. 18; 1 Cor. 5; etc.). 3. In order to maintain a proper witness to the world; the church corporately, as with the elder individually, is "to have a good reputation with those outside the church" (1 Tim. 3:7). 4. To facilitate growth and to preserve unity in the body (Eph. 4:1-16). 5. To expose unbelievers (1 John 2:19). 6. To restore the erring brother/sister to obedience and fellowship (1 Cor. 5:5; 2 Cor. 2:6,7,10; Gal. 6:1; 2 Thes. 3:14-15). 7. To deter others (1 Tim. 5:20). 8. To avert corporate discipline (Rev. 2:14-25). 9. Because sin is rarely if ever an individual issue: it almost always has corporate ramifications (2 Cor. 2:5); the whole of the body (or at least a large segment of it) is adversely affected by the misdeeds of one member. 10. Evidently Paul believed that the willingness to embrace the task of discipline was a mark of maturity in a church's corporate life (2 Cor. 2:9).

Reference:   Special Study on Church Discipline, www.samstorms.com/all-articles/post/2-corinthians-2:5-11, Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
8.
In what instances or for what sins should [church discipline] be exercised? 1. Unrepentant moral evil (1 Cor. 5). 2. Divisiveness and serious doctrinal error (Rom. 16:17-18; Titus 3:9-10). 3. General offenses (such that are not included under the above two categories; see Gal. 6:1; 2 Thess. 3:6-15).

In what instances or for what sins should [church discipline] be exercised? 1. Unrepentant moral evil (1 Cor. 5). 2. Divisiveness and serious doctrinal error (Rom. 16:17-18; Titus 3:9-10). 3. General offenses (such that are not included under the above two categories; see Gal. 6:1; 2 Thess. 3:6-15).

Reference:   Special Study on Church Discipline, www.samstorms.com/all-articles/post/2-corinthians-2:5-11, Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
9.
What procedural steps are to be taken? Matthew 18:15-17 recommends the following steps: First, private rebuke (Mt. 18:15) – do it gently, in love, out of compassion, seeking to encourage; the purpose for private rebuke is to resolve the problem without fueling unnecessary gossip. Second, if private rebuke is unsuccessful, plural rebuke (Mt. 18:16; see also Deut. 17:6; 19:15; Num. 35:30) – who are these others? church leaders? people who know the person? people who know of the sin? Third, if plural rebuke is unsuccessful, public rebuke (Mt. 18:17). Fourth, if public rebuke is unsuccessful, “excommunication” (Mt. 18:17; 1 Cor. 5:11; Titus 3:10; possibly 2 Thes. 3:14). Fifth, if repentance occurs, restoration to fellowship and reaffirmation of love (2 Cor. 2:6-8; 2 Thes. 3:14-15; Gal. 6:1). Sixth, verses 18-20 affirm that whatever decision is made in the matter, whether the offending person is “bound” or “loosed”, reflects the will of God in heaven. The promise “is that God will provide wisdom, guidance, and power for decision-making to the church that is united in its powers regarding the matters of church discipline” (Laney, A Guide to Church Discipline, 76). Thus, the verdict of heaven, so to speak, is consonant with that of the church, before whom the matter was adjudicated.

What procedural steps are to be taken? Matthew 18:15-17 recommends the following steps: First, private rebuke (Mt. 18:15) - do it gently, in love, out of compassion, seeking to encourage; the purpose for private rebuke is to resolve the problem without fueling unnecessary gossip. Second, if private rebuke is unsuccessful, plural rebuke (Mt. 18:16; see also Deut. 17:6; 19:15; Num. 35:30) - who are these others? church leaders? people who know the person? people who know of the sin? Third, if plural rebuke is unsuccessful, public rebuke (Mt. 18:17). Fourth, if public rebuke is unsuccessful, "excommunication" (Mt. 18:17; 1 Cor. 5:11; Titus 3:10; possibly 2 Thes. 3:14). Fifth, if repentance occurs, restoration to fellowship and reaffirmation of love (2 Cor. 2:6-8; 2 Thes. 3:14-15; Gal. 6:1). Sixth, verses 18-20 affirm that whatever decision is made in the matter, whether the offending person is "bound" or "loosed", reflects the will of God in heaven. The promise "is that God will provide wisdom, guidance, and power for decision-making to the church that is united in its powers regarding the matters of church discipline" (Laney, A Guide to Church Discipline, 76). Thus, the verdict of heaven, so to speak, is consonant with that of the church, before whom the matter was adjudicated.

Reference:   Special Study on Church Discipline, www.samstorms.com/all-articles/post/2-corinthians-2:5-11, Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
10.
By whom is discipline to be administered? The elders of the church (Acts 20:28ff.; 1 Thess. 5:14; Heb. 3:17)and…the congregation (Gal. 6:1; 2 Cor. 2:6).

By whom is discipline to be administered? The elders of the church (Acts 20:28ff.; 1 Thess. 5:14; Heb. 3:17)and...the congregation (Gal. 6:1; 2 Cor. 2:6).

Reference:   Special Study on Church Discipline, www.samstorms.com/all-articles/post/2-corinthians-2:5-11, Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
11.
Who is subject to church discipline? Any member of the body of Christ [and] even elders, but with special requirements (1 Tim. 5:19-20).

Who is subject to church discipline? Any member of the body of Christ [and] even elders, but with special requirements (1 Tim. 5:19-20).

Reference:   Special Study on Church Discipline, www.samstorms.com/all-articles/post/2-corinthians-2:5-11, Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
12.
The only authoritative interpreter of a book is its author!

The only authoritative interpreter of a book is its author!

Reference:   Special Revelation II, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


13.
The inspiration and authority of the Bible is the bedrock upon which our faith is built. Without it, we are doomed to uncertainty, doubt, and a hopeless groping in the darkness of human speculation.

The inspiration and authority of the Bible is the bedrock upon which our faith is built. Without it, we are doomed to uncertainty, doubt, and a hopeless groping in the darkness of human speculation.

Reference:   Special Revelation I, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Authority-Bible
14.
Jesus himself clearly believed in the inspiration and authority of Scripture. Being a disciple of Jesus entails not only doing what Jesus did but also believing what Jesus believed. It is impossible to accept the authority of Christ without also accepting the authority of Scripture. To believe and receive Jesus as Lord and Savior is to believe and receive what He taught about Scripture.

Jesus himself clearly believed in the inspiration and authority of Scripture. Being a disciple of Jesus entails not only doing what Jesus did but also believing what Jesus believed. It is impossible to accept the authority of Christ without also accepting the authority of Scripture. To believe and receive Jesus as Lord and Savior is to believe and receive what He taught about Scripture.

Reference:   Special Revelation I, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Authority-Bible
15.
Whereas the Bible explicitly forbids drunkenness, it nowhere requires total abstinence. Make no mistake: total abstinence from alcohol is great. As a Christian you are certainly free to adopt that as a lifestyle. But you are not free to condemn those who choose to drink in moderation. You may discuss with them the wisdom of such a choice and the practical consequences of it, but you cannot condemn them as sub-spiritual or as falling short of God’s best.

Whereas the Bible explicitly forbids drunkenness, it nowhere requires total abstinence. Make no mistake: total abstinence from alcohol is great. As a Christian you are certainly free to adopt that as a lifestyle. But you are not free to condemn those who choose to drink in moderation. You may discuss with them the wisdom of such a choice and the practical consequences of it, but you cannot condemn them as sub-spiritual or as falling short of God’s best.

Reference:   Legalism vs. Liberty, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Alcohol
16.
Less than half of 1% of all abortions are for rape. As horrible and devastating as rape is, I do not believe it justifies abortion.

1. It is not morally right to punish the child for the sin of his/her father.

2. While rape is an act of violence against the mother, so too is abortion.

3. It is never right to commit murder to alleviate suffering. It is not right to require the child to forfeit life in order to ameliorate the mother’s pain.

4. A child conceived by rape is no less human, no less a person with dignity and value, than a child conceived in love. Nowhere in Scripture is a person’s right to life conditional on how one’s life began.

Less than half of 1% of all abortions are for rape. As horrible and devastating as rape is, I do not believe it justifies abortion. 1. It is not morally right to punish the child for the sin of his/her father. 2. While rape is an act of violence against the mother, so too is abortion. 3. It is never right to commit murder to alleviate suffering. It is not right to require the child to forfeit life in order to ameliorate the mother’s pain. 4. A child conceived by rape is no less human, no less a person with dignity and value, than a child conceived in love. Nowhere in Scripture is a person's right to life conditional on how one’s life began.

Reference:   Abortion, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Abortion
17.
That which distinguishes man from the animal kingdom is the imago Dei, the image of God. The image of God has traditionally been identified with such things as rationality, self-consciousness, the exercise of dominion, and moral conscience. However, we must be careful in defining the image of God in wholly functional terms. The image of God is as much a state as it is a capacity. The image is not to be conceived as an end in a process whereby an unborn entity progresses into personhood. The image is a given, not a goal to which the fetus moves in its physiological development. No one denies that the fetus develops. But this development is not from non-person to part-person to full-person, but rather from full-person to the consummate expression and experience of all that personhood entails.

That which distinguishes man from the animal kingdom is the imago Dei, the image of God. The image of God has traditionally been identified with such things as rationality, self-consciousness, the exercise of dominion, and moral conscience. However, we must be careful in defining the image of God in wholly functional terms. The image of God is as much a state as it is a capacity. The image is not to be conceived as an end in a process whereby an unborn entity progresses into personhood. The image is a given, not a goal to which the fetus moves in its physiological development. No one denies that the fetus develops. But this development is not from non-person to part-person to full-person, but rather from full-person to the consummate expression and experience of all that personhood entails.

Reference:   Abortion, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
18.
What is repentance? 1. Recognition – [Repentance is] an awareness of having defied God by embracing what He despises and despising what He adores.  2. Remorse – Repentance is never a pleasure. It always entails pain. It demands brokenness of heart (Ps. 51:17; Isa. 57:15). [It is not] out of fear of reprisal, rather than from a hatred of sin. 3. Request – We must ask God for forgiveness and for strength. 4. Repudiation – We must repudiate all sins in question and take active, practical steps to avoid anything that might provoke stumbling. 5. Reformation – There must be an overt determination to pursue purity, to do what pleases God (1 Thes. 1:9).

What is repentance? 1. Recognition - [Repentance is] an awareness of having defied God by embracing what He despises and despising what He adores. 2. Remorse - Repentance is never a pleasure. It always entails pain. It demands brokenness of heart (Ps. 51:17; Isa. 57:15). [It is not] out of fear of reprisal, rather than from a hatred of sin. 3. Request - We must ask God for forgiveness and for strength. 4. Repudiation - We must repudiate all sins in question and take active, practical steps to avoid anything that might provoke stumbling. 5. Reformation - There must be an overt determination to pursue purity, to do what pleases God (1 Thes. 1:9).

Reference:   Summarized from: 2 Corinthians 6:14-7:16, November 8, 2006, Used by Permission.


19.
Remorse, regret, sorrow, and the pain provoked by sin will only increase and intensify the longer we are Christians. Maturity in the faith does not lead to less sorrow over sin, but more. The pain does not diminish; it deepens.

Remorse, regret, sorrow, and the pain provoked by sin will only increase and intensify the longer we are Christians. Maturity in the faith does not lead to less sorrow over sin, but more. The pain does not diminish; it deepens.

Reference:   Summarized from: 2 Corinthians 6:14-7:16, November 8, 2006, Used by Permission.


20.
If offense is to be taken at the gospel, let it be because of the gospel, not the one who proclaims it.

If offense is to be taken at the gospel, let it be because of the gospel, not the one who proclaims it.

Reference:   2 Corinthians 6:1-13, November 9, 2006, Used by Permission.


21.
In whom is the New Covenant fulfilled? [Several suggestions] have been given (one’s decision on this question will be determined by the interpretation of Luke 22:20 (Mt. 26:28; Mark 14:24); 1 Cor. 11:25; 2 Cor. 3:6; Hebrews 8:6-13; 9:15; 10:15; 10:19ff.). 1. The New Covenant was given exclusively for ethnic Israel and will therefore be fulfilled only in her at the end of the age when Israel as a nation is saved. The Church has no part in the blessings of this covenant. 2. There are two New Covenants, one for ethnic Israel and one for the Church. 3. There is only one New Covenant, for Israel, in which the Church shares spiritually. I.e., those blessings in the covenant which pertain to salvation are equally enjoyed by the Church, but those that pertain to earthly prominence in the land belong solely to Israel. 4. There is only one New Covenant. The Church, being the historical continuation of the believing remnant within Israel, is the recipient of its blessings. Thus, both believing Jews and believing Gentiles, the latter of whom have been graciously included in the covenants of promise (Eph. 2:12), together and equally enjoy the fulfillment of all aspects of the New Covenant. According to this view, there is a biblical expectation of a mass salvation among the Jewish people who will then be incorporated into the Church, the body of Christ. 5. There is only one New Covenant, of which the Church, which has replaced Israel in the purposes of God, is the recipient. This is commonly referred to as Replacement Theology. According to this view, there is no biblical expectation of a mass salvation among the Jewish people. 6. here are two covenants, one for the Jewish people and one for those (whether Jew or Gentile) who embrace Jesus as Messiah. The latter comprise the Church. The former are Jews who need not believe that Jesus is the Messiah but who relate savingly to God via Judaism.

In whom is the New Covenant fulfilled? [Several suggestions] have been given (one's decision on this question will be determined by the interpretation of Luke 22:20 (Mt. 26:28; Mark 14:24); 1 Cor. 11:25; 2 Cor. 3:6; Hebrews 8:6-13; 9:15; 10:15; 10:19ff.). 1. The New Covenant was given exclusively for ethnic Israel and will therefore be fulfilled only in her at the end of the age when Israel as a nation is saved. The Church has no part in the blessings of this covenant. 2. There are two New Covenants, one for ethnic Israel and one for the Church. 3. There is only one New Covenant, for Israel, in which the Church shares spiritually. I.e., those blessings in the covenant which pertain to salvation are equally enjoyed by the Church, but those that pertain to earthly prominence in the land belong solely to Israel. 4. There is only one New Covenant. The Church, being the historical continuation of the believing remnant within Israel, is the recipient of its blessings. Thus, both believing Jews and believing Gentiles, the latter of whom have been graciously included in the covenants of promise (Eph. 2:12), together and equally enjoy the fulfillment of all aspects of the New Covenant. According to this view, there is a biblical expectation of a mass salvation among the Jewish people who will then be incorporated into the Church, the body of Christ. 5. There is only one New Covenant, of which the Church, which has replaced Israel in the purposes of God, is the recipient. This is commonly referred to as Replacement Theology. According to this view, there is no biblical expectation of a mass salvation among the Jewish people. 6. here are two covenants, one for the Jewish people and one for those (whether Jew or Gentile) who embrace Jesus as Messiah. The latter comprise the Church. The former are Jews who need not believe that Jesus is the Messiah but who relate savingly to God via Judaism.

Reference:   2 Corinthians 3:1-18, Excursus on the New Covenant, Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Covenant-New
22.
Our giving is but a reflex of God’s giving.

Our giving is but a reflex of God’s giving.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 64. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved. Get this book!


23.
There is always design in our distress. God so values our trust in Him alone that He will graciously take away everything else in the world that we might be tempted to rely on: even life itself if necessary. His desire is that we grow deeper and stronger in our confidence that He Himself is all we need.

There is always design in our distress. God so values our trust in Him alone that He will graciously take away everything else in the world that we might be tempted to rely on: even life itself if necessary. His desire is that we grow deeper and stronger in our confidence that He Himself is all we need.

Reference:   2 Corinthians 1:1-11, November 17, 2006, www.samstorms.com, Used by Permission.


24.
The love of God as manifested in special grace is the love of God as Savior, which consists of redemption, the efficacy of regenerating grace, and the irrevocable possession of eternal life. It is a discriminate and particular love that leads Him to bestow the grace of eternal life in Christ. It is received and experienced by the elect only.

The love of God as manifested in special grace is the love of God as Savior, which consists of redemption, the efficacy of regenerating grace, and the irrevocable possession of eternal life. It is a discriminate and particular love that leads Him to bestow the grace of eternal life in Christ. It is received and experienced by the elect only.

Reference:   The Love of God, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
25.
We say we want revival…but on our terms. Sadly, we pray:

1. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if You promise in advance to do things the way we have always done them in our church.”

2. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if I have some sort of prior guarantee that when You show up you won’t embarrass me.”

3. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if Your work of revival is one that I can still control, one that preserves intact the traditions with which I am comfortable.”

4. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if Your work of revival is neat and tidy and dignified and understandable and above all else socially acceptable.”

5. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if You plan to change others; only if You make them to be like me; only if You convict their hearts so they will live and dress and talk like I do.”

6. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if You let us preserve our distinctives and retain our differences from others whom we find offensive.”

We say we want revival…but on our terms. Sadly, we pray: 1. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if You promise in advance to do things the way we have always done them in our church.” 2. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if I have some sort of prior guarantee that when You show up you won’t embarrass me.” 3. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if Your work of revival is one that I can still control, one that preserves intact the traditions with which I am comfortable.” 4. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if Your work of revival is neat and tidy and dignified and understandable and above all else socially acceptable.” 5. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if You plan to change others; only if You make them to be like me; only if You convict their hearts so they will live and dress and talk like I do.” 6. “Come Holy Spirit…but only if You let us preserve our distinctives and retain our differences from others whom we find offensive.”

Reference:   Reflections in Revival, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
26.
Not everyone is a candidate to be a friend:

1. “Do not be envious of evil men, nor desire to be with them, for their minds devise violence and their lips talk of trouble” (Prov.24:1-2).

2. “A perverse man spreads strife, and a slanderer separates intimate friends” (Prov. 16:28).

3. “Leave the presence of a fool, or you will not discern words of knowledge” (Prov. 14:7).

4. “He who goes about as a slanderer reveals secrets; therefore, do not associate with a gossip” (Prov. 20:19).

5. “Do not associate with a man given to anger, or go with a hot-tempered man; lest you learn his ways, and find a snare for yourself” (Prov. 22:24-25).

6. “Do not be with heavy drinkers of wine or with gluttonous eaters of meat” (Prov. 23:20).

7. “Do not associate with those who are given to change, for their calamity will rise suddenly and who knows the ruin that comes from them” (Prov. 24:21-22).

Not everyone is a candidate to be a friend: 1. “Do not be envious of evil men, nor desire to be with them, for their minds devise violence and their lips talk of trouble” (Prov.24:1-2). 2. “A perverse man spreads strife, and a slanderer separates intimate friends” (Prov. 16:28). 3. “Leave the presence of a fool, or you will not discern words of knowledge” (Prov. 14:7). 4. “He who goes about as a slanderer reveals secrets; therefore, do not associate with a gossip” (Prov. 20:19). 5. “Do not associate with a man given to anger, or go with a hot-tempered man; lest you learn his ways, and find a snare for yourself” (Prov. 22:24-25). 6. “Do not be with heavy drinkers of wine or with gluttonous eaters of meat” (Prov. 23:20). 7. “Do not associate with those who are given to change, for their calamity will rise suddenly and who knows the ruin that comes from them” (Prov. 24:21-22).

Reference:   The Apostle Paul on Friendship, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Friendship
27.
Truths about Friendship – From the life of Paul [in 2 Timothy 4]:

1. Paul believed in the critical importance of having close friends – verses 9, 21a.

2. Paul knew from personal experience the pain and anguish of loneliness – verses 10b, 11a, 16a.

3. Paul knew the importance of having the right kind of friends: be discerning and selective – verses 14-15.

4. Paul knew from personal experience the pain of betrayal and abandonment – verses 10a, 16.

5. Paul had learned the importance of forgiving those who had failed him. In fact, he believed in giving old friends who had blown it another chance – verses 11b, 16b.

6. As you grow old in life, in addition to friends, you need books! – verse 13.

7. In the final analysis, when everything is said and done, Jesus will always be your best friend; the only friend you can always count on – verses 17-18.

Truths about Friendship – From the life of Paul [in 2 Timothy 4]: 1. Paul believed in the critical importance of having close friends – verses 9, 21a. 2. Paul knew from personal experience the pain and anguish of loneliness – verses 10b, 11a, 16a. 3. Paul knew the importance of having the right kind of friends: be discerning and selective – verses 14-15. 4. Paul knew from personal experience the pain of betrayal and abandonment – verses 10a, 16. 5. Paul had learned the importance of forgiving those who had failed him. In fact, he believed in giving old friends who had blown it another chance – verses 11b, 16b. 6. As you grow old in life, in addition to friends, you need books! – verse 13. 7. In the final analysis, when everything is said and done, Jesus will always be your best friend; the only friend you can always count on – verses 17-18.

Reference:   The Apostle Paul on Friendship, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Friendship
28.
God is most glorified in us when our knowledge and experience of Him ignite a forest fire of joy that consumes all competing pleasures and He alone becomes the treasure that we prize.

God is most glorified in us when our knowledge and experience of Him ignite a forest fire of joy that consumes all competing pleasures and He alone becomes the treasure that we prize.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.12. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


29.
We do not have any honor and glory in our possession that He supposedly lacks, thinking that somehow we are able to give Him what He does not already have inherently and eternally. Our role, our joy, is to ascribe and declare and proclaim to and of Him what He is and always will be.

We do not have any honor and glory in our possession that He supposedly lacks, thinking that somehow we are able to give Him what He does not already have inherently and eternally. Our role, our joy, is to ascribe and declare and proclaim to and of Him what He is and always will be.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.56. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


30.
To say that worship is either about glorifying God or finding personal satisfaction is to put asunder what God has joined together. His glory and your gladness are not separate tracks moving in opposite directions. Rather His glory is in your gladness in Him.

To say that worship is either about glorifying God or finding personal satisfaction is to put asunder what God has joined together. His glory and your gladness are not separate tracks moving in opposite directions. Rather His glory is in your gladness in Him.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 211. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved. Get this book!


31.
[Are we] so much in love with Jesus, so utterly enthralled with the transcendent beauties of [our] Savior, so swallowed up in the adequacy of the Son of God in all things that nothing appear[s] so sweet to [us] as obedience to His commands?

[Are we] so much in love with Jesus, so utterly enthralled with the transcendent beauties of [our] Savior, so swallowed up in the adequacy of the Son of God in all things that nothing appear[s] so sweet to [us] as obedience to His commands?

Reference:   Copied from Pleasures Evermore by Sam Storms © 2000, p. 160. Used by Permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


32.
I know this sounds strange, but there is a way of “serving God” that belittles Him, insults Him, and thus robs Him of glory. We must beware of serving Him in a way that implies a deficiency on His part or asserts our indispensability to Him. God is not in need of our service or help. We are in need of His. His purpose in the earth is not sustained by our energy. Rather, we are sustained and strengthened by His. We have nothing of value that is not already His by right.

I know this sounds strange, but there is a way of “serving God” that belittles Him, insults Him, and thus robs Him of glory. We must beware of serving Him in a way that implies a deficiency on His part or asserts our indispensability to Him. God is not in need of our service or help. We are in need of His. His purpose in the earth is not sustained by our energy. Rather, we are sustained and strengthened by His. We have nothing of value that is not already His by right.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 60. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


33.
Not all doctrines are equally important. They are equally true, but not all truth is equally important. It isn’t a matter of some doctrines being “more true” than others, as if some doctrines are partially false. It is rather that some doctrines bear less impact than others on our capacity to know, love, and obey God.

Not all doctrines are equally important. They are equally true, but not all truth is equally important. It isn’t a matter of some doctrines being “more true” than others, as if some doctrines are partially false. It is rather that some doctrines bear less impact than others on our capacity to know, love, and obey God.

Reference:   Authority and Method in Theology, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


34.
God has a holy temper, but He has a very long fuse! Even those who deny and blaspheme His name are recipients of His patience and long-suffering. He permits His enemies to live, to spew forth their horrid blasphemies, all the while blessing them with food and air and earthly pleasures (see Romans 2:4-5).

God has a holy temper, but He has a very long fuse! Even those who deny and blaspheme His name are recipients of His patience and long-suffering. He permits His enemies to live, to spew forth their horrid blasphemies, all the while blessing them with food and air and earthly pleasures (see Romans 2:4-5).

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 199. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Mercy
35.
The original law of the universe is that “the soul that sins, it shall die.” Life is a divine gift, not a debt. Sin brings the loss of the gift of life. Once a person sins he forfeits any claim on God to human existence. The fact that we continue to exist after sinning is owing wholly to divine mercy and gracious longsuffering.

The original law of the universe is that “the soul that sins, it shall die.” Life is a divine gift, not a debt. Sin brings the loss of the gift of life. Once a person sins he forfeits any claim on God to human existence. The fact that we continue to exist after sinning is owing wholly to divine mercy and gracious longsuffering.

Reference:   Is God Guilty of Genocide, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Mercy
36.
There are no term limits on His reign. He has always been King and He always will be King. There is no death that threatens the perpetuity of His sovereign authority. There is no usurping of power by a lesser rival to His throne. There are no coups, no revolutions (at least, none that succeed). There is no threat of impeachment. He is a King who rules eternally.

There are no term limits on His reign. He has always been King and He always will be King. There is no death that threatens the perpetuity of His sovereign authority. There is no usurping of power by a lesser rival to His throne. There are no coups, no revolutions (at least, none that succeed). There is no threat of impeachment. He is a King who rules eternally.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.60. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Eternality
37.
Thus the Calvinist says that God elects unbelievers and predestines them to become believers. The Arminian, on the other hand, says that God elects believers and predestines them to become His children… The question…is this: Are faith and repentance produced by free will and thus the cause of election, or are they produced by the Holy Spirit and thus the effect of election? According to Arminianism, election is that act of God whereby He foreordains to eternal life those whom He foresees will respond in faith to the gospel. According to Calvinism, election is that act of God whereby He foreordains to eternal life those who, because of sin, cannot respond in faith to the gospel.

Thus the Calvinist says that God elects unbelievers and predestines them to become believers. The Arminian, on the other hand, says that God elects believers and predestines them to become His children… The question…is this: Are faith and repentance produced by free will and thus the cause of election, or are they produced by the Holy Spirit and thus the effect of election? According to Arminianism, election is that act of God whereby He foreordains to eternal life those whom He foresees will respond in faith to the gospel. According to Calvinism, election is that act of God whereby He foreordains to eternal life those who, because of sin, cannot respond in faith to the gospel.

Reference:   What is Election? November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


38.
By making election conditional upon something that man does, even if what he does is simply to repent and believe the gospel, God’s grace is seriously compromised. To say that something is done by grace is simply to say it is done by God. If salvation is from beginning to end a manifestation of God’s grace then it is from beginning to end a work of God. To inject any human effort or contribution whatsoever is to reject divine grace. Either election is unconditional and altogether of God and His grace or it is conditional and therefore a cooperative venture in which God and man both contribute.

By making election conditional upon something that man does, even if what he does is simply to repent and believe the gospel, God’s grace is seriously compromised. To say that something is done by grace is simply to say it is done by God. If salvation is from beginning to end a manifestation of God’s grace then it is from beginning to end a work of God. To inject any human effort or contribution whatsoever is to reject divine grace. Either election is unconditional and altogether of God and His grace or it is conditional and therefore a cooperative venture in which God and man both contribute.

Reference:   Grace – Part 1, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
39.
Only the doctrine of unconditional election preserves the integrity of divine grace. According to the notion of conditional election, God graciously makes possible, but not certain, the election of all people by restoring to each that power and freedom of will of which they had been deprived by Adam’s fall into sin. Whether or not God elects any person is therefore dependent on the way in which he or she makes use of this ability. By establishing the condition for election as faith, God is thereby obligated to elect all those who, by means of their now purportedly free wills, believe in the gospel of Christ. But surely, then, election itself can be neither of grace nor according to God’s good pleasure. I suppose one might say that it was gracious of God to restore in all people sufficient ability to believe and that it was gracious of God to impose the condition of faith in Christ (by which one qualifies for election). But it is certainly not possible to say that election is itself gracious. To choose men because they believe is an obligation to which God is bound; it is a debt he must pay. If it would be unjust of God, having made faith the condition of election, not to elect those who believe, then election is a matter of giving man his due. Election would be the divine response to what a person deserves. He deserves being chosen because by a free act of will he has fulfilled the condition (faith) on which election was suspended… How can election be gracious if it is something God must do because justice requires it? Election is gracious precisely because it is the bestowal of life on those who deserve only death.

Only the doctrine of unconditional election preserves the integrity of divine grace. According to the notion of conditional election, God graciously makes possible, but not certain, the election of all people by restoring to each that power and freedom of will of which they had been deprived by Adam’s fall into sin. Whether or not God elects any person is therefore dependent on the way in which he or she makes use of this ability. By establishing the condition for election as faith, God is thereby obligated to elect all those who, by means of their now purportedly free wills, believe in the gospel of Christ. But surely, then, election itself can be neither of grace nor according to God’s good pleasure. I suppose one might say that it was gracious of God to restore in all people sufficient ability to believe and that it was gracious of God to impose the condition of faith in Christ (by which one qualifies for election). But it is certainly not possible to say that election is itself gracious. To choose men because they believe is an obligation to which God is bound; it is a debt he must pay. If it would be unjust of God, having made faith the condition of election, not to elect those who believe, then election is a matter of giving man his due. Election would be the divine response to what a person deserves. He deserves being chosen because by a free act of will he has fulfilled the condition (faith) on which election was suspended… How can election be gracious if it is something God must do because justice requires it? Election is gracious precisely because it is the bestowal of life on those who deserve only death.

Reference:   Grace – Part II, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
40.
No one who believes in the Bible disputes the fact that election is taught there. It isn’t the reality of election, or even its source, author, time, or goal that has elicited so much venom among professing Christians. It is rather the basis of divine election, that is to say, why and on what grounds some are elected to salvation and life and others are not. There are essentially only three options, the first of which is more pagan than Christian.

1. It has been argued that God elects those who are good. In this view, election is a debt God is obliged to pay, not a gift He graciously bestows. It is on the basis of inherent or self-generated righteousness that God elects men and women. This is the doctrine of Pelagianism, named after the British monk Pelagius who popularized the view in the fifth century. One would be hard-pressed to find an advocate of this perspective within the professing Christian church.

2. Others contend that God elects some who are bad who, notwithstanding their being bad, choose to exercise faith in Jesus Christ. It is on the basis of this foreseen faith that God elects them. This is the doctrine of Arminianism, named after the Dutch theologian James Arminius (1560-1609). It has also been called Wesleyanism because of the influence of John Wesley.

3. There is the view that God elects some who are bad who, because of their being bad, are not of themselves able to exercise faith in Christ. It is on the basis of His own sovereign good pleasure that God elects them. This is the doctrine of Calvinism, named after the French theologian John Calvin (1509-1564).

No one who believes in the Bible disputes the fact that election is taught there. It isn’t the reality of election, or even its source, author, time, or goal that has elicited so much venom among professing Christians. It is rather the basis of divine election, that is to say, why and on what grounds some are elected to salvation and life and others are not. There are essentially only three options, the first of which is more pagan than Christian. 1. It has been argued that God elects those who are good. In this view, election is a debt God is obliged to pay, not a gift He graciously bestows. It is on the basis of inherent or self-generated righteousness that God elects men and women. This is the doctrine of Pelagianism, named after the British monk Pelagius who popularized the view in the fifth century. One would be hard-pressed to find an advocate of this perspective within the professing Christian church. 2. Others contend that God elects some who are bad who, notwithstanding their being bad, choose to exercise faith in Jesus Christ. It is on the basis of this foreseen faith that God elects them. This is the doctrine of Arminianism, named after the Dutch theologian James Arminius (1560-1609). It has also been called Wesleyanism because of the influence of John Wesley. 3. There is the view that God elects some who are bad who, because of their being bad, are not of themselves able to exercise faith in Christ. It is on the basis of His own sovereign good pleasure that God elects them. This is the doctrine of Calvinism, named after the French theologian John Calvin (1509-1564).

Reference:   What is Election? November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
41.
Here’s the rub: We simply don’t like the idea that the reason for God’s choices resides wholly within God. We want to account for His decision. We want to explain it, to rationalize it, to provide grounds and warrant for it. We want to be able to point to “factor A, or datum B, or issue C” in something other than God or preferably to “characteristic X, or virtue Y, or work Z” in us. We want to point to this quality or that personality trait or some accomplishment in one that isn’t in another as the grounds for God’s decision.

Here’s the rub: We simply don’t like the idea that the reason for God’s choices resides wholly within God. We want to account for His decision. We want to explain it, to rationalize it, to provide grounds and warrant for it. We want to be able to point to “factor A, or datum B, or issue C” in something other than God or preferably to “characteristic X, or virtue Y, or work Z” in us. We want to point to this quality or that personality trait or some accomplishment in one that isn’t in another as the grounds for God’s decision.

Reference:   Divine Election: How and Why Does God Choose? – Part II, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
42.
Some contend that we should believe in divine election reluctantly, wishing that it were otherwise than what we find in Scripture. They argue that we should speak of it with sadness and regret, and talk about it only when pushed or coerced to do so. But there is something seriously wrong when we fail to rejoice in what pleases God. There is a grievous flaw in our thinking and in our affections when we are reluctant to speak about what God spoke so often of in Scripture.

Some contend that we should believe in divine election reluctantly, wishing that it were otherwise than what we find in Scripture. They argue that we should speak of it with sadness and regret, and talk about it only when pushed or coerced to do so. But there is something seriously wrong when we fail to rejoice in what pleases God. There is a grievous flaw in our thinking and in our affections when we are reluctant to speak about what God spoke so often of in Scripture.

Reference:   Divine Election: How and Why Does God Choose? – Part II, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
43.
God did not sovereignly choose you so that the idea of Him choosing you might merely bounce around in your brain. He chose you for worship. The ultimate purpose of predestination is praise! You have been chosen for this goal: the proclamation of his excellencies and your extravagantly affectionate and inexpressibly joyful delight in them (cf. 1 Peter 1:8; 2:9).

God did not sovereignly choose you so that the idea of Him choosing you might merely bounce around in your brain. He chose you for worship. The ultimate purpose of predestination is praise! You have been chosen for this goal: the proclamation of his excellencies and your extravagantly affectionate and inexpressibly joyful delight in them (cf. 1 Peter 1:8; 2:9).

Reference:   Divine Election: How and Why Does God Choose? – Part II, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
44.
Divine election is certainly one of the more profound and controversial doctrines in Holy Scripture. To some it is an idea conceived in hell, a tool of Satan wielded by him to thwart the evangelistic zeal of the church and thus responsible for populating hell with men and women who otherwise would have been reached with the gospel message. To others divine election is the heart and soul of Scripture, the most comforting and reassuring of biblical truths apart from which grace loses its power and God His glory. To the former, then, election is a primary reason why people are in hell. To the latter, it is the only reason why people are in heaven!

Divine election is certainly one of the more profound and controversial doctrines in Holy Scripture. To some it is an idea conceived in hell, a tool of Satan wielded by him to thwart the evangelistic zeal of the church and thus responsible for populating hell with men and women who otherwise would have been reached with the gospel message. To others divine election is the heart and soul of Scripture, the most comforting and reassuring of biblical truths apart from which grace loses its power and God His glory. To the former, then, election is a primary reason why people are in hell. To the latter, it is the only reason why people are in heaven!

Reference:   What is Election? November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
45.
Nothing is more effective [understanding divine election] in killing human pride and promoting godly humility and granting insight into the nature of God and inflaming the heart in worship.

Nothing is more effective [understanding divine election] in killing human pride and promoting godly humility and granting insight into the nature of God and inflaming the heart in worship.

Reference:   Divine Election: How and Why Does God Choose? – Part I, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
46.
If God did not want us to understand His sovereign saving purposes, He would not have given such extensive instruction in His Word. “Therefore,” says Calvin, “We must guard against depriving believers of anything disclosed about predestination in Scripture, lest we seem either wickedly to defraud them of the blessing of their God or to accuse and scoff at the Holy Spirit for having published what it is in any way profitable to suppress” (Institutes, III.21.3).

If God did not want us to understand His sovereign saving purposes, He would not have given such extensive instruction in His Word. “Therefore,” says Calvin, “We must guard against depriving believers of anything disclosed about predestination in Scripture, lest we seem either wickedly to defraud them of the blessing of their God or to accuse and scoff at the Holy Spirit for having published what it is in any way profitable to suppress” (Institutes, III.21.3).

Reference:   Divine Election: How and Why Does God Choose? – Part I, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
47.
Those whom God chooses are chosen out from among all others. They who are chosen were in the same sinful condition, the same misery as the whole of the race. They were alike partakers of corruption, morally and spiritually destitute of anything good. They were, like all others, at enmity with God, serving Satan, deserving of death and condemnation, without righteousness. There is no distinction between elect and non-elect prior to the distinction that election makes.

Those whom God chooses are chosen out from among all others. They who are chosen were in the same sinful condition, the same misery as the whole of the race. They were alike partakers of corruption, morally and spiritually destitute of anything good. They were, like all others, at enmity with God, serving Satan, deserving of death and condemnation, without righteousness. There is no distinction between elect and non-elect prior to the distinction that election makes.

Reference:   Divine Election: How and Why Does God Choose? – Part II, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
48.
[Jonathan] Edwards reminds us that God doesn’t choose men because He foresees excellence in them, but “He makes them excellent because He has chosen them.” Or again, “God doesn’t choose men and set His love upon them because they love Him, for He hath first loved us” (1 John 4:10). “Nor did God choose men because He foresaw that they would believe and come to Christ. Faith is the fruit of election and not the cause of it.” “Nor is it from any foresight of men’s endeavors after conversion, because He sees that some will do much more than others to obtain heaven, that He chooses.”

[Jonathan] Edwards reminds us that God doesn’t choose men because He foresees excellence in them, but “He makes them excellent because He has chosen them.” Or again, “God doesn’t choose men and set His love upon them because they love Him, for He hath first loved us” (1 John 4:10). “Nor did God choose men because He foresaw that they would believe and come to Christ. Faith is the fruit of election and not the cause of it.” “Nor is it from any foresight of men’s endeavors after conversion, because He sees that some will do much more than others to obtain heaven, that He chooses.”

Reference:   Divine Election: How and Why Does God Choose? – Part II, Edwards quotes from: Christians a Chosen Generation, 17:280, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
49.
Although God always thinks and acts in perfect harmony with His nature, His nature is infinitely complex. His personality is deep and rich and diverse and ultimately inexhaustible. Just when you’ve got Him figured out, He’ll surprise you (but always in a good way).

Although God always thinks and acts in perfect harmony with His nature, His nature is infinitely complex. His personality is deep and rich and diverse and ultimately inexhaustible. Just when you’ve got Him figured out, He’ll surprise you (but always in a good way).

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.157. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


50.
The aesthetic experience of God, the encounter of the human soul with divine beauty, is more than merely enjoyable, it is profoundly transforming. There is within it the power to persuade and to convince the inquiring mind of truth. This may well be the Spirit’s greatest catalyst for change. Paul alluded to this in 2 Corinthians 3:18 when he said, “We all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being changed into His likeness from one degree of glory to another.” The point is that what we see is what we be! We do not simply behold beauty: beauty takes hold of us and challenges the allegiance of our hearts. Beauty calls us to reshape our lives and exposes the shabbiness of our conduct. It awakens us to the reality of a transcendent Being to whose likeness of beauty we are being called and conformed by His gracious initiative. Beauty has the power to dislodge from our hearts the grip of moral and spiritual ugliness. The soul’s engagement with beauty elicits love and forges in us a new affection that no earthly power can overcome.

The aesthetic experience of God, the encounter of the human soul with divine beauty, is more than merely enjoyable, it is profoundly transforming. There is within it the power to persuade and to convince the inquiring mind of truth. This may well be the Spirit’s greatest catalyst for change. Paul alluded to this in 2 Corinthians 3:18 when he said, “We all, with unveiled face, beholding the glory of the Lord, are being changed into His likeness from one degree of glory to another.” The point is that what we see is what we be! We do not simply behold beauty: beauty takes hold of us and challenges the allegiance of our hearts. Beauty calls us to reshape our lives and exposes the shabbiness of our conduct. It awakens us to the reality of a transcendent Being to whose likeness of beauty we are being called and conformed by His gracious initiative. Beauty has the power to dislodge from our hearts the grip of moral and spiritual ugliness. The soul’s engagement with beauty elicits love and forges in us a new affection that no earthly power can overcome.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.55. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Beauty
51.
Beauty also rebukes by revealing to us the moral deformity of those things we’ve embraced above Jesus and by exposing the hideous reality beyond the deceptively attractive façade of worldly amusements. We are deceived by the ugliness of sin because we haven’t gazed at the beauty of Christ. Distortion and perversion and futility are fully seen only in the perfect light of integrity and harmony and purpose which are revealed in Jesus.

Beauty also rebukes by revealing to us the moral deformity of those things we’ve embraced above Jesus and by exposing the hideous reality beyond the deceptively attractive façade of worldly amusements. We are deceived by the ugliness of sin because we haven’t gazed at the beauty of Christ. Distortion and perversion and futility are fully seen only in the perfect light of integrity and harmony and purpose which are revealed in Jesus.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.55-56. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Beauty
52.
We encounter the beauty of the Lord when we spiritually ingest the statements of Scripture concerning the wonders of who God is and all He does. When we take the scintillating truths of God and hide them in our hearts, meditate on them, muse on them, soak our souls in them, so to speak, we become infatuated with the exquisite personality of God.

We encounter the beauty of the Lord when we spiritually ingest the statements of Scripture concerning the wonders of who God is and all He does. When we take the scintillating truths of God and hide them in our hearts, meditate on them, muse on them, soak our souls in them, so to speak, we become infatuated with the exquisite personality of God.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.59. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Beauty
53.
Divine beauty is absolute, unqualified, and independent. All created reality, precisely because it is derivative of the Creator, is beautiful in a secondary sense and only to the degree that it reflects the excellencies of God and fulfills the purpose for which He has made it. Perfect order, harmony, magnitude, integrity, proportion, symmetry, and brilliance are found in God alone. There is in the personality and activity of God neither clash of color nor offensive sound. He is in every conceivable respect morally exquisite, spiritually sublime, and aesthetically elegant.

Divine beauty is absolute, unqualified, and independent. All created reality, precisely because it is derivative of the Creator, is beautiful in a secondary sense and only to the degree that it reflects the excellencies of God and fulfills the purpose for which He has made it. Perfect order, harmony, magnitude, integrity, proportion, symmetry, and brilliance are found in God alone. There is in the personality and activity of God neither clash of color nor offensive sound. He is in every conceivable respect morally exquisite, spiritually sublime, and aesthetically elegant.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.53-54. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Beauty
54.
In God alone are perfect proportion, harmony, unity, and diversity in delicate balance, stunning brilliance, and integrity. God is beautiful! If we were able to think of God as a painting, we would say that there are no random brush strokes, no clashes of colors. God is aesthetically exquisite. In God there is absolute resolution, integration, the utter absence of even one discordant element.

In God alone are perfect proportion, harmony, unity, and diversity in delicate balance, stunning brilliance, and integrity. God is beautiful! If we were able to think of God as a painting, we would say that there are no random brush strokes, no clashes of colors. God is aesthetically exquisite. In God there is absolute resolution, integration, the utter absence of even one discordant element.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 54. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Beauty
55.
God’s revelatory manifestation of Himself in creation, in providence, in Scripture, and pre-eminently in the face of His Son, Jesus Christ, is designed to evoke within the breathtaking delight and incomparable joy of which God alone is worthy. Beauty is that in God which makes Him eminently desirable and attractive and quickens in the soul a realization that it was made for a different world.

God’s revelatory manifestation of Himself in creation, in providence, in Scripture, and pre-eminently in the face of His Son, Jesus Christ, is designed to evoke within the breathtaking delight and incomparable joy of which God alone is worthy. Beauty is that in God which makes Him eminently desirable and attractive and quickens in the soul a realization that it was made for a different world.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.53. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Beauty
56.
God has sovereignly pulled back the curtain on His glory. He has disclosed Himself on the platform of both creation and redemption that we might stand awestruck in His presence, beholding the sweet symmetry of His attributes, pondering the unfathomable depths of His greatness, baffled by the wisdom of His deeds and the limitless extent of His goodness. This is His beauty.

God has sovereignly pulled back the curtain on His glory. He has disclosed Himself on the platform of both creation and redemption that we might stand awestruck in His presence, beholding the sweet symmetry of His attributes, pondering the unfathomable depths of His greatness, baffled by the wisdom of His deeds and the limitless extent of His goodness. This is His beauty.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.53. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Beauty
57.
How do you measure the value of something you hold dear? How do you assess the worth of a prize? Is it not by the depth of delight it induces in your heart? Is it not by the intensity and quality of your joy in what it is? Is it not by how excited and enthralled and thrilled you are in the manifold display of its attributes, characteristics, and properties? Is it not by the extent of the sacrifice you are willing to make to gain it, to guard it, and to keep it? In other words, your satisfaction in what the treasure is and does for you is the standard or gauge by which its glory (worth and value) is revealed. The treasure, which is God, is most glorified in and by you when your pleasure in Him is maximal and optimal.

How do you measure the value of something you hold dear? How do you assess the worth of a prize? Is it not by the depth of delight it induces in your heart? Is it not by the intensity and quality of your joy in what it is? Is it not by how excited and enthralled and thrilled you are in the manifold display of its attributes, characteristics, and properties? Is it not by the extent of the sacrifice you are willing to make to gain it, to guard it, and to keep it? In other words, your satisfaction in what the treasure is and does for you is the standard or gauge by which its glory (worth and value) is revealed. The treasure, which is God, is most glorified in and by you when your pleasure in Him is maximal and optimal.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.35-36. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Joy-God
58.
I believe that exulting in God is the most biblical and effective means for exalting God! Or to put it in other terms: to prize God is to praise God! Or again, we are His pleasure when He is our treasure! Or again, God is most glorified in you when you are most satisfied in Him.

I believe that exulting in God is the most biblical and effective means for exalting God! Or to put it in other terms: to prize God is to praise God! Or again, we are His pleasure when He is our treasure! Or again, God is most glorified in you when you are most satisfied in Him.

Reference:   The Ultimate Aim of Theology, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Joy-God
59.
Pleasure is the measure of our treasure. How do you measure or assess the value of something you cherish? How do you determine the worth of a prize? Is it not by the depth of pleasure you derive from it? Is it not by the intensity and quality of your delight in what it is? Is it not by how excited and enthralled and thrilled you are in the manifold display of its attributes, characteristics, and properties? In other words, your satisfaction in what the treasure is and what the treasure does for you is the standard or gauge by which its glory (worth and value) is revealed. Hence, your pleasure is the measure of the treasure. Or again, the treasure, which is God, is most glorified in and by you when your pleasure in Him is maximal and optimal.

Pleasure is the measure of our treasure. How do you measure or assess the value of something you cherish? How do you determine the worth of a prize? Is it not by the depth of pleasure you derive from it? Is it not by the intensity and quality of your delight in what it is? Is it not by how excited and enthralled and thrilled you are in the manifold display of its attributes, characteristics, and properties? In other words, your satisfaction in what the treasure is and what the treasure does for you is the standard or gauge by which its glory (worth and value) is revealed. Hence, your pleasure is the measure of the treasure. Or again, the treasure, which is God, is most glorified in and by you when your pleasure in Him is maximal and optimal.

Reference:   The Ultimate Aim of Theology, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


60.
The happiness for which we are eternally destined is a state of soul in which we experience and express optimum ecstasy in God. Happiness is the whole soul resting in God and rejoicing that so beautiful and glorious a Being is ours. Happiness is the privilege of being enabled by God’s grace to enjoy making much of Him forever. I’m talking about the ineffable and unending pleasure of blissful union with and the joyful celebration of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. This is a joy of such transcendent quality that no persecution or pain or deprivation can diminish, nor wealth or success or prosperity can enhance.

The happiness for which we are eternally destined is a state of soul in which we experience and express optimum ecstasy in God. Happiness is the whole soul resting in God and rejoicing that so beautiful and glorious a Being is ours. Happiness is the privilege of being enabled by God’s grace to enjoy making much of Him forever. I’m talking about the ineffable and unending pleasure of blissful union with and the joyful celebration of Father, Son, and Holy Spirit. This is a joy of such transcendent quality that no persecution or pain or deprivation can diminish, nor wealth or success or prosperity can enhance.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.15. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Joy-God
61.
There is a sense in which the human soul has caved in on itself and is now held captive by a fixation with its own states and conditions and concerns. The soul has become parasitic on itself, feeding on its needs and cravings by excessive introspection and elaborate attempts to elevate its sense of self-worth. Your soul was never meant for this. You were designed for something better. You were built for the contemplation of something infinitely more complex, something incomparably more fascinating than your own “self.” You were created for the joyful contemplation of God.

There is a sense in which the human soul has caved in on itself and is now held captive by a fixation with its own states and conditions and concerns. The soul has become parasitic on itself, feeding on its needs and cravings by excessive introspection and elaborate attempts to elevate its sense of self-worth. Your soul was never meant for this. You were designed for something better. You were built for the contemplation of something infinitely more complex, something incomparably more fascinating than your own “self.” You were created for the joyful contemplation of God.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.85-86. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


62.
Theological ignorance won’t take us very far, at least not in the right direction. Excitement uninformed by truth invariably leads either to idolatry or fanaticism. If we don’t know the God we enjoy, we may end up enjoying the wrong god!

Theological ignorance won’t take us very far, at least not in the right direction. Excitement uninformed by truth invariably leads either to idolatry or fanaticism. If we don’t know the God we enjoy, we may end up enjoying the wrong god!

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.12-13. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


63.
You can’t escape your passion for pleasure. It will haunt you in the night. It will whisper to you in the day. You will feel its impulse in all you do and think and say. The problem is not that we desire. The problem is that we desire sin rather than God. The problem is that we have been duped by the Devil. We have believed what is perhaps the most pernicious lie ever told, namely, that the pleasures and delights of the world, the flesh, and the Devil are more enjoyable and satisfying than who God is for us in Jesus.

You can’t escape your passion for pleasure. It will haunt you in the night. It will whisper to you in the day. You will feel its impulse in all you do and think and say. The problem is not that we desire. The problem is that we desire sin rather than God. The problem is that we have been duped by the Devil. We have believed what is perhaps the most pernicious lie ever told, namely, that the pleasures and delights of the world, the flesh, and the Devil are more enjoyable and satisfying than who God is for us in Jesus.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 48. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Joy-God
64.
Do you fear that it might one day run dry, that the capacity of God to “entertain” and “thrill” your soul with Christ will soon dissipate as eventually do all earthly pleasures? Then you have not yet considered the inexhaustible resources for joy in the inexhaustible heart of God.

Do you fear that it might one day run dry, that the capacity of God to “entertain” and “thrill” your soul with Christ will soon dissipate as eventually do all earthly pleasures? Then you have not yet considered the inexhaustible resources for joy in the inexhaustible heart of God.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 164. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Joy-God
65.
God has, as it were, placed Himself on display in the art gallery of the universe. He beckons His people, you and me, to stand in awe as we behold the symmetry of His attributes, the harmony of His deeds, the glory of His goodness, the overwhelming and unfathomable grandeur of His greatness; in a word, His beauty. God is infinitely splendid and invites us to come and bask in His beauty that we might enjoy Him to the fullest.

God has, as it were, placed Himself on display in the art gallery of the universe. He beckons His people, you and me, to stand in awe as we behold the symmetry of His attributes, the harmony of His deeds, the glory of His goodness, the overwhelming and unfathomable grandeur of His greatness; in a word, His beauty. God is infinitely splendid and invites us to come and bask in His beauty that we might enjoy Him to the fullest.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 54. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Sam Storms
66.
My principal motivation in life must be to increase my pleasure in God. In fact, my prayer every day is “Oh God, mobilize all Your power on my behalf to maximize my pleasure and delight in You.” Don’t misunderstand what I’m suggesting. I’m not saying that pleasure is put above God, nor that pleasure is God. I’m saying that our pleasure must be in God. The pleasure or satisfaction we seek is God Himself. God is not a tool for finding pleasure. God is not the shovel, so to speak, with which we dig for buried jewels. God is Himself that treasure. The Christian’s pursuit of happiness is consummated when we find in God our all in all. He and He alone is our exceeding great reward. He is not a means to a higher end. He is the end.

My principal motivation in life must be to increase my pleasure in God. In fact, my prayer every day is “Oh God, mobilize all Your power on my behalf to maximize my pleasure and delight in You.” Don’t misunderstand what I’m suggesting. I’m not saying that pleasure is put above God, nor that pleasure is God. I’m saying that our pleasure must be in God. The pleasure or satisfaction we seek is God Himself. God is not a tool for finding pleasure. God is not the shovel, so to speak, with which we dig for buried jewels. God is Himself that treasure. The Christian’s pursuit of happiness is consummated when we find in God our all in all. He and He alone is our exceeding great reward. He is not a means to a higher end. He is the end.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 79. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Joy-God
67.
The Bible reveals at least five purposes for sex in marriage:

1. Procreation (the raising up of a godly seed).

2. To enhance the experience of companionship.

3. To foster physical, as well as spiritual, unity (“one flesh”; Gen. 2:24).

4. Pleasure (Song of Solomon).

5. To curb fornication and lust (1 Cor. 7).

The Bible reveals at least five purposes for sex in marriage: 1. Procreation (the raising up of a godly seed). 2. To enhance the experience of companionship. 3. To foster physical, as well as spiritual, unity (“one flesh”; Gen. 2:24). 4. Pleasure (Song of Solomon). 5. To curb fornication and lust (1 Cor. 7).

Reference:   Birth Control, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


68.
While standing in line at the grocery story I made the mistake of scanning the covers of several rather tawdry tabloids. The heading on one of them virtually shouted at unwary customers: “The Greatest Sex You’ve Ever Had!” No, I resisted the urge to read the article. Because I have read the book! The Bible! God, yes God, has a prescription for great sex for His people.

While standing in line at the grocery story I made the mistake of scanning the covers of several rather tawdry tabloids. The heading on one of them virtually shouted at unwary customers: “The Greatest Sex You’ve Ever Had!” No, I resisted the urge to read the article. Because I have read the book! The Bible! God, yes God, has a prescription for great sex for His people.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 230. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


69.
Each of us is under a divine mandate to become an amateur astronomer, to peer into the incalculable depths of sky and space to behold the handiwork of our omnipotent Creator.

Each of us is under a divine mandate to become an amateur astronomer, to peer into the incalculable depths of sky and space to behold the handiwork of our omnipotent Creator.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.87. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
70.
The physical world is a window to the beauty of God. Nature or creation or the cosmos, however you wish to put it, is here, not primarily that we might exploit its resources to enhance our comfort, nor as a means to expand our control over those weaker than ourselves, nor as merely the platform on which we might live out our desires and fulfill our personal vision. The physical world exists pre-eminently to display for our eternal joy the artistic creativity, endless power, and manifold wisdom of its Creator, the Son, our Lord Jesus Christ.

The physical world is a window to the beauty of God. Nature or creation or the cosmos, however you wish to put it, is here, not primarily that we might exploit its resources to enhance our comfort, nor as a means to expand our control over those weaker than ourselves, nor as merely the platform on which we might live out our desires and fulfill our personal vision. The physical world exists pre-eminently to display for our eternal joy the artistic creativity, endless power, and manifold wisdom of its Creator, the Son, our Lord Jesus Christ.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.108-109. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
71.
The invisible is made visible via creation or nature. Divine wisdom, power, eternity and goodness, for example, are not in themselves visible, but their reality is undeniably affirmed and apprehended by the effects they produce in nature. That there is a God, supreme, eternal, infinite in power, personal, wise, independent, worthy of glory and gratitude, is clearly evident in the creation.

The invisible is made visible via creation or nature. Divine wisdom, power, eternity and goodness, for example, are not in themselves visible, but their reality is undeniably affirmed and apprehended by the effects they produce in nature. That there is a God, supreme, eternal, infinite in power, personal, wise, independent, worthy of glory and gratitude, is clearly evident in the creation.

Reference:   General Revelation, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
72.
The revelation of God in creation and conscience is sufficient to render all men without excuse, sufficient to lead to their condemnation if they repudiate it, but not sufficient to save. No one will be saved solely because of their acknowledgment of God in nature, but many will be lost because of their refusal of Him as revealed there. In other words, general revelation lacks redemptive content. It is epistemically adequate but soteriologically inadequate. It makes known that there is a God who punishes sin but not that He pardons it.

The revelation of God in creation and conscience is sufficient to render all men without excuse, sufficient to lead to their condemnation if they repudiate it, but not sufficient to save. No one will be saved solely because of their acknowledgment of God in nature, but many will be lost because of their refusal of Him as revealed there. In other words, general revelation lacks redemptive content. It is epistemically adequate but soteriologically inadequate. It makes known that there is a God who punishes sin but not that He pardons it.

Reference:   General Revelation, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
73.
The so-called heathen are not condemned for rejecting Jesus, about whom they have heard nothing, but for rejecting the Father, about whom they have heard and seen much.

The so-called heathen are not condemned for rejecting Jesus, about whom they have heard nothing, but for rejecting the Father, about whom they have heard and seen much.

Reference:   General Revelation, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
74.
We must leave room for mystery in God’s ways. Some things will always remain unexplained. Why God does or does not choose to heal is ultimately subject to his wisdom and sovereign purposes. Why God chooses to heal in part or in whole, now or later, this person but not that one, is often beyond our capacity to understand. Resist the tendency to replace divine mystery with human formulas.

We must leave room for mystery in God’s ways. Some things will always remain unexplained. Why God does or does not choose to heal is ultimately subject to his wisdom and sovereign purposes. Why God chooses to heal in part or in whole, now or later, this person but not that one, is often beyond our capacity to understand. Resist the tendency to replace divine mystery with human formulas.

Reference:   The Healing Ministry of Jesus, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Healing-General
75.
If God has called someone to ministry He will provide the grace to meet the qualifications for it. The biblical criteria for those in church leadership pertain not only to intellectual and theological skills but also to character, with an emphasis on moral and spiritual maturity. Any effort aimed at identifying those called to church leadership and providing encouragement to them must entail appropriate steps at character development [according to 1 Timothy 3 and Titus 1].

If God has called someone to ministry He will provide the grace to meet the qualifications for it. The biblical criteria for those in church leadership pertain not only to intellectual and theological skills but also to character, with an emphasis on moral and spiritual maturity. Any effort aimed at identifying those called to church leadership and providing encouragement to them must entail appropriate steps at character development [according to 1 Timothy 3 and Titus 1].

Reference:   Are You Called to Ministry – Part II, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


76.
There is a primary sense in which all Christians are “called”, for Jesus Christ is Lord over all of life, over every task, over every endeavor. But there is another sense in which only some are “called” to fulfill those special responsibilities and ministries set forth in Scripture on which the life and order of the church directly depend.

There is a primary sense in which all Christians are “called”, for Jesus Christ is Lord over all of life, over every task, over every endeavor. But there is another sense in which only some are “called” to fulfill those special responsibilities and ministries set forth in Scripture on which the life and order of the church directly depend.

Reference:   Are You Called to Ministry – Part I, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


77.
The ultimate goal of theology is not knowledge, but worship. If our learning and knowledge of God do not lead to the joyful praise of God, we have failed. We learn only that we might laud. Another way of putting it is to say that theology without doxology is idolatry. The only theology worth studying is a theology that can be sung.

The ultimate goal of theology is not knowledge, but worship. If our learning and knowledge of God do not lead to the joyful praise of God, we have failed. We learn only that we might laud. Another way of putting it is to say that theology without doxology is idolatry. The only theology worth studying is a theology that can be sung.

Reference:   The Ultimate Aim of Theology, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
78.
Many mistakenly think of God as if He were an insecure bully who likes to flex His heavenly muscles by putting down those who are weaker than He is. But God loves to show off His greatness and glory by being an inexhaustible source of strength to build up weak people like you and me. We honor God not by pretending to give Him what we arrogantly think He needs, but by praying for and posturing ourselves to receive all that He is and has obtained for us in Jesus.

Many mistakenly think of God as if He were an insecure bully who likes to flex His heavenly muscles by putting down those who are weaker than He is. But God loves to show off His greatness and glory by being an inexhaustible source of strength to build up weak people like you and me. We honor God not by pretending to give Him what we arrogantly think He needs, but by praying for and posturing ourselves to receive all that He is and has obtained for us in Jesus.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 74. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: God-Omnipotence
79.
Loving God requires a loving God. We will be passionate for Him only so far as He is passionate for us. To love God as we were made to love Him requires an antecedent love in God for those whom He has made. He must take the initiative. He must reveal the depths and extent of His commitment to us and the delight in His heart for broken people. Only then will our slumbering and self-centered souls be aroused to seek Him with all our hearts and relish the revelation of Himself in the person of His Son, the man Christ Jesus.

Loving God requires a loving God. We will be passionate for Him only so far as He is passionate for us. To love God as we were made to love Him requires an antecedent love in God for those whom He has made. He must take the initiative. He must reveal the depths and extent of His commitment to us and the delight in His heart for broken people. Only then will our slumbering and self-centered souls be aroused to seek Him with all our hearts and relish the revelation of Himself in the person of His Son, the man Christ Jesus.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p. 149, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Love-God-for
80.
Evangelicals are quick to defend the truth that in Jesus Christ “all the fullness of the Deity lives in bodily form” (Col. 2:9), and rightly we should. But there is a tendency among us, in the interests of Christ’s deity to minimize His humanity.

Evangelicals are quick to defend the truth that in Jesus Christ “all the fullness of the Deity lives in bodily form” (Col. 2:9), and rightly we should. But there is a tendency among us, in the interests of Christ’s deity to minimize His humanity.

Reference:   Reaching God’s Ear by Sam Storms, Copyright © 1988, p. 151. Used by permission of Tyndale House Publishers, Inc. All rights reserved.


81.
Nowhere in the Bible is the “mind,” per se, described as evil or unworthy of being the means by which God communicates with us. What the Bible does denounce is intellectual pride, but not the intellect itself. It is humility that we need, not ignorance. I stand opposed to arrogant and cynical intellectualism. But that is not the same thing as using the mind God has given us, with the help of the Holy Spirit and the instruction of Scripture, to evaluate and discern and critically assess what is happening in both the church and the world. Whereas some things that God says and does are transrational, insofar as they are mysterious and often go beyond our ability to fully comprehend, God never does things that are irrational in the sense that they might violate the fundamental laws of logic or the reasonable and rational truths of Holy Scripture.

Nowhere in the Bible is the “mind,” per se, described as evil or unworthy of being the means by which God communicates with us. What the Bible does denounce is intellectual pride, but not the intellect itself. It is humility that we need, not ignorance. I stand opposed to arrogant and cynical intellectualism. But that is not the same thing as using the mind God has given us, with the help of the Holy Spirit and the instruction of Scripture, to evaluate and discern and critically assess what is happening in both the church and the world. Whereas some things that God says and does are transrational, insofar as they are mysterious and often go beyond our ability to fully comprehend, God never does things that are irrational in the sense that they might violate the fundamental laws of logic or the reasonable and rational truths of Holy Scripture.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 203. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Mind
82.
Grace is not only the divine act by which God initiates our spiritual life, but also the very power by which we are sustained in, nourished, and proceeds through that life. The energizing and sanctifying work of the indwelling Spirit is the grace of God. After Paul had prayed three times for God to deliver him from his thorn in the flesh, he received this answer: "My grace is sufficient for you, for My power is made perfect in weakness" (2 Cor. 12:9). Although Paul undoubtedly derived encouragement and strength to face his daily trials by reflecting on the magnificence of God’s unmerited favor, in this text he appears to speak rather of an experiential reality of a more dynamic nature. It is the operative power of the indwelling Spirit to which Paul refers. That is the grace of God.

Grace is not only the divine act by which God initiates our spiritual life, but also the very power by which we are sustained in, nourished, and proceeds through that life. The energizing and sanctifying work of the indwelling Spirit is the grace of God. After Paul had prayed three times for God to deliver him from his thorn in the flesh, he received this answer: "My grace is sufficient for you, for My power is made perfect in weakness" (2 Cor. 12:9). Although Paul undoubtedly derived encouragement and strength to face his daily trials by reflecting on the magnificence of God’s unmerited favor, in this text he appears to speak rather of an experiential reality of a more dynamic nature. It is the operative power of the indwelling Spirit to which Paul refers. That is the grace of God.

Reference:   Grace – Part II, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
83.
For the ascetic, the body is a thing to be punished, denied, even abused. The body is regarded as evil and the only way to defeat it is to starve it of anything that might a spark desire… In brief, asceticism is the belief that if you add up enough physical negatives you will get a spiritual positive. Mere avoidance becomes the pathway to holiness.

For the ascetic, the body is a thing to be punished, denied, even abused. The body is regarded as evil and the only way to defeat it is to starve it of anything that might a spark desire… In brief, asceticism is the belief that if you add up enough physical negatives you will get a spiritual positive. Mere avoidance becomes the pathway to holiness.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 129. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Asceticism
84.
Discernment and spiritual insight are the result of the exercise and use of spiritual faculties, such that can only come with time, growth, and experience.

Discernment and spiritual insight are the result of the exercise and use of spiritual faculties, such that can only come with time, growth, and experience.

Reference:   The Carnal Christian – Study of 1 Corinthians 3:1-3, November 6, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Wisdom-Human
85.
Joy is not necessarily the absence of suffering, it is the presence of God.

Joy is not necessarily the absence of suffering, it is the presence of God.

Reference:   Copied from: Pleasures Evermore: The Life-Changing Power of Knowing God by Sam Storms, © 2000, p. 60. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.org. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Sam Storms
Topics: Joy-Defined
86.
The Intermediate State refers to that period and/or experience of the individual between the time of physical death and bodily resurrection.

The Intermediate State refers to that period and/or experience of the individual between the time of physical death and bodily resurrection.

Reference:   Individual Eschatology, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


87.
The intermediate state for the Christian is immediate transition upon death into the presence of Christ during which time we experience holiness (no longer being at war with the flesh, although final glorification awaits the resurrection), happiness, a heightened sense of consciousness, and knowledge of Christ in its fullest. For the non-Christians a heightened sense of consciousness, but one of torment, agony, irreversible separation from Christ (Luke 16).

The intermediate state for the Christian is immediate transition upon death into the presence of Christ during which time we experience holiness (no longer being at war with the flesh, although final glorification awaits the resurrection), happiness, a heightened sense of consciousness, and knowledge of Christ in its fullest. For the non-Christians a heightened sense of consciousness, but one of torment, agony, irreversible separation from Christ (Luke 16).

Reference:   Individual Eschatology, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


88.
If you truly love your “self” (and all of us do), take your eyes off “self” and do your “self” as favor: “Look at Me, says the Lord. The state and condition and circumstances of your soul will change for the good only to the degree that you make My glory the object of your obsession.”

If you truly love your “self” (and all of us do), take your eyes off “self” and do your “self” as favor: “Look at Me, says the Lord. The state and condition and circumstances of your soul will change for the good only to the degree that you make My glory the object of your obsession.”

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p. 86, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
89.
To think that everyone in heaven is equally knowledgeable, equally holy, equally capable or enjoying God, is to argue that the progress we make now on earth is irrelevant to our heavenly state. But we are often exhorted to do things now precisely because it will build up and increase for us treasure in heaven. Not everyone responds to these commands in the same way or to the same degree or with the same measure of faithfulness. Thus people will enter heaven at differing degrees of holiness, love, and joy. All will be subject to increase and expansion based on the depth and measure of our development here on earth. What we do and know and achieve now, by God’s grace, will have eternal consequences.

To think that everyone in heaven is equally knowledgeable, equally holy, equally capable or enjoying God, is to argue that the progress we make now on earth is irrelevant to our heavenly state. But we are often exhorted to do things now precisely because it will build up and increase for us treasure in heaven. Not everyone responds to these commands in the same way or to the same degree or with the same measure of faithfulness. Thus people will enter heaven at differing degrees of holiness, love, and joy. All will be subject to increase and expansion based on the depth and measure of our development here on earth. What we do and know and achieve now, by God’s grace, will have eternal consequences.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.175-176. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
90.
There will be a time [in heaven] when we are denied what we desire. Happiness consists in part in the satisfaction of desire. In heaven, with each desire there is fulfillment. We will desire only what is good and righteous and honoring to God, and it would be hell if such desire were left unsatisfied. Each new desire is but a fitting prelude to the delight that comes with its satisfaction.

There will be a time [in heaven] when we are denied what we desire. Happiness consists in part in the satisfaction of desire. In heaven, with each desire there is fulfillment. We will desire only what is good and righteous and honoring to God, and it would be hell if such desire were left unsatisfied. Each new desire is but a fitting prelude to the delight that comes with its satisfaction.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.177. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
91.
Heaven is not one grand, momentary flash of excitement followed by an eternity of boredom. Heaven is not going to be an endless series of earthly re-runs! There will be a new episode of divine grace every day! A new revelation every moment of some heretofore unseen aspect of the unfathomable complexity of divine compassion. A new and fresh disclosure of an implication or consequence of God’s mercy, every day. A novel and stunning explanation of the meaning of what God has done for us, without end.

Heaven is not one grand, momentary flash of excitement followed by an eternity of boredom. Heaven is not going to be an endless series of earthly re-runs! There will be a new episode of divine grace every day! A new revelation every moment of some heretofore unseen aspect of the unfathomable complexity of divine compassion. A new and fresh disclosure of an implication or consequence of God’s mercy, every day. A novel and stunning explanation of the meaning of what God has done for us, without end.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.171. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
92.
Our experience of God will never reach its consummation. We will never finally arrive, as if upon reaching a peak we discover there is nothing beyond. Our experience of God will never become stale. It will deepen and develop, intensify and amplify, unfold and increase, broaden and balloon. Our relishing and rejoicing in God will sharpen and spread and extend and progress and mature and flower and blossom and widen and stretch and swell and snowball and inflate and lengthen and augment and advance and proliferate and accumulate and accelerate and multiply and heighten and reach a crescendo that will even then be only the beginning of an eternity of new and fresh insights into the majesty of who God is!

Our experience of God will never reach its consummation. We will never finally arrive, as if upon reaching a peak we discover there is nothing beyond. Our experience of God will never become stale. It will deepen and develop, intensify and amplify, unfold and increase, broaden and balloon. Our relishing and rejoicing in God will sharpen and spread and extend and progress and mature and flower and blossom and widen and stretch and swell and snowball and inflate and lengthen and augment and advance and proliferate and accumulate and accelerate and multiply and heighten and reach a crescendo that will even then be only the beginning of an eternity of new and fresh insights into the majesty of who God is!

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.172-173. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
93.
There never will come a time [in heaven] when we will know all that can be known or see or feel or experience or enjoy all that can be enjoyed. We will never plumb the depths of gratification in God nor reach its end. Our satisfaction and delight in Him are subject to incessant increase. When it comes to heavenly euphoria, words such as termination and cessation and expiration and finality are utterly inappropriate and inapplicable.

There never will come a time [in heaven] when we will know all that can be known or see or feel or experience or enjoy all that can be enjoyed. We will never plumb the depths of gratification in God nor reach its end. Our satisfaction and delight in Him are subject to incessant increase. When it comes to heavenly euphoria, words such as termination and cessation and expiration and finality are utterly inappropriate and inapplicable.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.173. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


94.
We must never forget that even in heaven only God is immutable or unchanging. We are ever subject to greater transformation and improvement. But it is always a change from one stage of glory and knowledge and holiness to the next higher stage of glory and knowledge and holiness. It is one thing to be free of imperfection, but another to experience perfection perfectly. We will be perfect in heaven from the first moment we arrive in that we will be free from defect, free from sin, free from moral corruption and selfishness. But that perfection is finite, because we are finite. It is always subject to expansion. There is change, but always for the better!

We must never forget that even in heaven only God is immutable or unchanging. We are ever subject to greater transformation and improvement. But it is always a change from one stage of glory and knowledge and holiness to the next higher stage of glory and knowledge and holiness. It is one thing to be free of imperfection, but another to experience perfection perfectly. We will be perfect in heaven from the first moment we arrive in that we will be free from defect, free from sin, free from moral corruption and selfishness. But that perfection is finite, because we are finite. It is always subject to expansion. There is change, but always for the better!

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.175. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
95.
Moses saw the “back”, or hindquarters of God, if you will (see Exodus 33:19-23). This resulted in a glowing brilliance on his face that terrified the people, from which they turned away. The dazzling brilliance that transformed Moses’ face was too much for them to bear, yet this came from his beholding the back of God, not His face! Our eternal destiny is to see Him face to face. What will it be for us to bask in the radiant glory and refulgent beauty of His divine countenance!

Moses saw the “back”, or hindquarters of God, if you will (see Exodus 33:19-23). This resulted in a glowing brilliance on his face that terrified the people, from which they turned away. The dazzling brilliance that transformed Moses’ face was too much for them to bear, yet this came from his beholding the back of God, not His face! Our eternal destiny is to see Him face to face. What will it be for us to bask in the radiant glory and refulgent beauty of His divine countenance!

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.179. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
96.
Three texts in Revelation tell us who and what will be absent in heaven. In 21:4 we see that no tears of grief, no death or sorrow or pain will be present. In 21:8 we are assured that no one who is cowardly, lying, or unbelieving will be present, or murderers, or anything abominable, immoral, or idolatrous. And, as if to sum up, we are told in 21:27 that nothing unclean will be allowed to enter.

Three texts in Revelation tell us who and what will be absent in heaven. In 21:4 we see that no tears of grief, no death or sorrow or pain will be present. In 21:8 we are assured that no one who is cowardly, lying, or unbelieving will be present, or murderers, or anything abominable, immoral, or idolatrous. And, as if to sum up, we are told in 21:27 that nothing unclean will be allowed to enter.

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.178. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


97.
You need never live in fear that any heavenly joy will ever be lost or taken away! We struggle to enjoy life now from fear that it will soon end. We hesitate to savor what little happiness we have for fear that it may be taken away. We hold back and hedge our bets and restrain our souls, knowing that disaster may soon come, economic recession may begin, physical health may deteriorate, someone may die, or something unforeseen may surprise us and take it all away. But not in heaven! Never! The beauty and joy and glory and delight and satisfaction and purity will never ever end, but only increase and grow and expand and multiply!

You need never live in fear that any heavenly joy will ever be lost or taken away! We struggle to enjoy life now from fear that it will soon end. We hesitate to savor what little happiness we have for fear that it may be taken away. We hold back and hedge our bets and restrain our souls, knowing that disaster may soon come, economic recession may begin, physical health may deteriorate, someone may die, or something unforeseen may surprise us and take it all away. But not in heaven! Never! The beauty and joy and glory and delight and satisfaction and purity will never ever end, but only increase and grow and expand and multiply!

Reference:   One Thing, Christian Focus, © Enjoying God Ministries, 2004, p.182-183. www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Sam Storms
98.
[Forgiveness] is [often] deciding to live with the painful consequences of another person’s sin. You are going to have to live with it anyway, so you might as well do it without the bitterness and rancor and hatred that threaten to destroy your soul.

[Forgiveness] is [often] deciding to live with the painful consequences of another person’s sin. You are going to have to live with it anyway, so you might as well do it without the bitterness and rancor and hatred that threaten to destroy your soul.

Reference:   Forgiveness: What It Is, What It Is Not, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


99.
The way we cancel the debt of one who has sinned against us is by promising not to bring it up to the offender, to others, or to ourselves. We joyfully resolve never to throw the sin back into the face of the one who committed it. We promise never to hold it over their head, using it to manipulate and shame them. And we promise never to bring it up to others in an attempt to justify ourselves or to undermine their reputation. And lastly, we promise never to bring it up to ourselves as grounds for self-pity or to justify our resentment of the person who hurt us.

The way we cancel the debt of one who has sinned against us is by promising not to bring it up to the offender, to others, or to ourselves. We joyfully resolve never to throw the sin back into the face of the one who committed it. We promise never to hold it over their head, using it to manipulate and shame them. And we promise never to bring it up to others in an attempt to justify ourselves or to undermine their reputation. And lastly, we promise never to bring it up to ourselves as grounds for self-pity or to justify our resentment of the person who hurt us.

Reference:   Forgiveness: What It Is, What It Is Not, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.


100.
True forgiveness pursues relationship and restoration. True forgiveness is not satisfied with simply canceling the debt. It longs to love again.

True forgiveness pursues relationship and restoration. True forgiveness is not satisfied with simply canceling the debt. It longs to love again.

Reference:   Forgiveness: What It Is, What It Is Not, November 8, 2006, www.enjoyinggodministries.com. Used by Permission.