SEARCH BY AUTHORS

Quotes of Author: Phillip-keller

1.
The degree to which I am able and willing to forgive others is a clear indication of the extent to which I have personally experienced God my Father’s forgiveness for me. The corollary to this is that anyone who is not willing to forgive another has certainly not known God’s loving forgiveness.

The degree to which I am able and willing to forgive others is a clear indication of the extent to which I have personally experienced God my Father’s forgiveness for me. The corollary to this is that anyone who is not willing to forgive another has certainly not known God’s loving forgiveness.


2.
I know of nothing which so stimulates my faith in my Heavenly Father as to look back and reflect on His faithfulness to me in every crisis and every chilling circumstance of life. Over and over He has proved His care and concern for my welfare.  gain and again I have been conscious of the Good Shepherd’s guidance through dark days and deep valleys.

I know of nothing which so stimulates my faith in my Heavenly Father as to look back and reflect on His faithfulness to me in every crisis and every chilling circumstance of life. Over and over He has proved His care and concern for my welfare.  gain and again I have been conscious of the Good Shepherd’s guidance through dark days and deep valleys.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com, 1970, p. 82. Get this book!


3.
It is no accident that God has chosen to call us sheep.  The behavior of sheep and human beings is similar in many ways. …Our mass mind (or mob instincts), our fears and timidity, our stubbornness and stupidity, our perverse habits are all parallels of profound importance.  Yet despite these adverse characteristics Christ has chooses us, buys us, calls us by name, makes us His own and delights in caring for us.

It is no accident that God has chosen to call us sheep.  The behavior of sheep and human beings is similar in many ways. …Our mass mind (or mob instincts), our fears and timidity, our stubbornness and stupidity, our perverse habits are all parallels of profound importance.  Yet despite these adverse characteristics Christ has chooses us, buys us, calls us by name, makes us His own and delights in caring for us.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com, 1970, p. 7. Get this book!


Author: Phillip Keller
Topics: Humanity
4.
There are many willful, wayward, indifferent, self-interested Christians who cannot really be classified as followers of Christ. There are relatively few diligent disciples who forsake all to follow the Master.

There are many willful, wayward, indifferent, self-interested Christians who cannot really be classified as followers of Christ. There are relatively few diligent disciples who forsake all to follow the Master.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com. 1970, p. 67. Get this book!


Author: Phillip Keller
Topics: Discipleship
5.
The only real, practical measure of my apprehension for the goodness and mercy of God to me is the extent to which I am, in turn, prepared to show goodness and mercy to others.

The only real, practical measure of my apprehension for the goodness and mercy of God to me is the extent to which I am, in turn, prepared to show goodness and mercy to others.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com, 1970, p. 133. Get this book!


6.
For the child of God, death is not the end but merely the door into a higher and more exalted life of intimate contact with Christ. Death is but the dark valley opening out into an eternity of delight with God. It is not something to fear, but an experience through which one passes on the path to a more perfect life.

For the child of God, death is not the end but merely the door into a higher and more exalted life of intimate contact with Christ. Death is but the dark valley opening out into an eternity of delight with God. It is not something to fear, but an experience through which one passes on the path to a more perfect life.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com. 1970, p. 76-77. Get this book!


7.
Material success is no measure of spiritual health. Nor is apparent affluence any criterion of real godliness. And it is well for us that the Shepherd of our souls sees through this exterior and takes steps to set things right.

Material success is no measure of spiritual health. Nor is apparent affluence any criterion of real godliness. And it is well for us that the Shepherd of our souls sees through this exterior and takes steps to set things right.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com, 1970, p. 59. Get this book!


8.
In dealing with our old self-life, there will come a day when the Master must take us in hand and apply the keen cutting edge of His Word to our lives. It may be an unpleasant business for a time. No doubt we’ll struggle and kick about it. We may get a few cuts and wounds. But what a relief when it is all over. Oh, the pleasure of being set free from ourselves! What restoration!

In dealing with our old self-life, there will come a day when the Master must take us in hand and apply the keen cutting edge of His Word to our lives. It may be an unpleasant business for a time. No doubt we’ll struggle and kick about it. We may get a few cuts and wounds. But what a relief when it is all over. Oh, the pleasure of being set free from ourselves! What restoration!

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com. 1970, p. 58.


Author: Phillip Keller
Topics: Conviction
9.
In the Christian life it is of more than passing significance to observe that those who are often the most serene, most confident and able to cope with life’s complexities are those who rise early each day to feed on God’s Word. It is in the quiet, early hours of the morning that they are led beside the quiet, still waters where they imbibe the very life of Christ for the day.

In the Christian life it is of more than passing significance to observe that those who are often the most serene, most confident and able to cope with life’s complexities are those who rise early each day to feed on God’s Word. It is in the quiet, early hours of the morning that they are led beside the quiet, still waters where they imbibe the very life of Christ for the day.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com. 1970, p. 43. Get this book!


Author: Phillip Keller
Topics: Devotionals
10.
Whenever I am afield or outdoors, there steals over me the acute consciousness that I am confronted on every hand by the superb workmanship of my Father. It is as if every tree, rock, river, flower, mountain, bird, or blade of grass had stamped upon it the indelible label, "Made by God." Is it any wonder that in a simple yet sublime sense of devotion, respect, and reverence for all life, Christ longed for His Father’s name to be hallowed throughout the earth?

Whenever I am afield or outdoors, there steals over me the acute consciousness that I am confronted on every hand by the superb workmanship of my Father. It is as if every tree, rock, river, flower, mountain, bird, or blade of grass had stamped upon it the indelible label, "Made by God." Is it any wonder that in a simple yet sublime sense of devotion, respect, and reverence for all life, Christ longed for His Father's name to be hallowed throughout the earth?


11.
Though born amid most disgusting surroundings, the member of a modest working family, He bore Himself always with great dignity and assurance. Though He enjoyed no special advantages as a child, either in education or employment, His entire philosophy and outlook on life were the highest standards of human conduct ever set before mankind. Though He had no vast economic assets, political power or military might, no other person ever made such an enormous impact on the world’s history. Because of Him millions of people across almost twenty centuries of time have come into a life of decency and honor and noble conduct.

Though born amid most disgusting surroundings, the member of a modest working family, He bore Himself always with great dignity and assurance. Though He enjoyed no special advantages as a child, either in education or employment, His entire philosophy and outlook on life were the highest standards of human conduct ever set before mankind. Though He had no vast economic assets, political power or military might, no other person ever made such an enormous impact on the world’s history. Because of Him millions of people across almost twenty centuries of time have come into a life of decency and honor and noble conduct.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com, 1970, p. 9. Get this book!


12.
Here we commemorate the greatest and deepest demonstration of true love the world has ever known. For God looked down upon sorrowing, struggling, sinning humanity and was moved with compassion for the contrary, sheep-like creatures He had made. In spite of the tremendous personal cost it would entail to Himself to deliver them from their dilemma He chose deliberately to descend and live amongst them that He might deliver them. This meant laying aside His splendor, His position, His prerogatives as the perfect and faultless One. He knew He would be exposed to terrible privation, to ridicule, to false accusations, to rumor, gossip and malicious charges that branded Him as a glutton, drunkard, friend of sinners and even an imposter. It entailed losing His reputation. It would involve physical suffering, mental anguish and spiritual agony. In short, His coming to earth as the Christ, as Jesus of Nazareth, was a straightforward case of utter self-sacrifice that culminated in the cross of Calvary. The laid-down life, the poured-out blood were the supreme symbols of total selflessness. This was love. This was God.  This was divinity in action, delivering men from their own utter selfishness, their own stupidity, their own suicidal instincts as lost sheep unable to help themselves.

Here we commemorate the greatest and deepest demonstration of true love the world has ever known. For God looked down upon sorrowing, struggling, sinning humanity and was moved with compassion for the contrary, sheep-like creatures He had made. In spite of the tremendous personal cost it would entail to Himself to deliver them from their dilemma He chose deliberately to descend and live amongst them that He might deliver them. This meant laying aside His splendor, His position, His prerogatives as the perfect and faultless One. He knew He would be exposed to terrible privation, to ridicule, to false accusations, to rumor, gossip and malicious charges that branded Him as a glutton, drunkard, friend of sinners and even an imposter. It entailed losing His reputation. It would involve physical suffering, mental anguish and spiritual agony. In short, His coming to earth as the Christ, as Jesus of Nazareth, was a straightforward case of utter self-sacrifice that culminated in the cross of Calvary. The laid-down life, the poured-out blood were the supreme symbols of total selflessness. This was love. This was God.  This was divinity in action, delivering men from their own utter selfishness, their own stupidity, their own suicidal instincts as lost sheep unable to help themselves.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com, 1970, p. 107-108. Get this book!


13.
It is this lack of love among Christians which today makes the church an insipid, lukewarm institution. People come to find affection and are turned off by our tepidity.

It is this lack of love among Christians which today makes the church an insipid, lukewarm institution. People come to find affection and are turned off by our tepidity.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com, 1970, p. 133. Get this book!


14.
Human beings, being what they are, somehow feel entitled to question the reasons for everything that happens to them.  In many instances life itself becomes a continual criticism and dissection of one’s circumstances and acquaintances. We look for someone or something on which to pin the blame for our misfortunes. We are often quick to forget our blessings, slow to forget our misfortunes.

Human beings, being what they are, somehow feel entitled to question the reasons for everything that happens to them.  In many instances life itself becomes a continual criticism and dissection of one’s circumstances and acquaintances. We look for someone or something on which to pin the blame for our misfortunes. We are often quick to forget our blessings, slow to forget our misfortunes.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com. 1970, p. 70. Get this book!


Author: Phillip Keller
Topics: Complaining
15.
When a man or woman allows his will to be crossed out, canceling the great “I” in their decisions, then indeed the Cross has been applied to that life. This is the meaning of taking up one’s cross daily – to go to one’s own death – no longer my will in the matter but His will be done.

When a man or woman allows his will to be crossed out, canceling the great “I” in their decisions, then indeed the Cross has been applied to that life. This is the meaning of taking up one’s cross daily – to go to one’s own death – no longer my will in the matter but His will be done.

Reference:   A Shepherd Looks at Psalm 23, Permission by Zondervan, www.zondervan.com.  1970, p. 71. Get this book!


Author: Phillip Keller
Topics: Cross-Bearing