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Quotes of Author: Kevin-vanhoozer

1.
Elsewhere in the Bible, “Son of God,” is used to refer to angels, the nation of Israel, or to the Davidic king. But nowhere else does the Bible speak of someone being God’s “one and only Son.” Being the one and only (“begotten,” KJV) Son of God means that Jesus, unlike the rest of us, is not adopted into the family of God but is rather the eternal Son of God, the second person of the Trinity.

Elsewhere in the Bible, “Son of God,” is used to refer to angels, the nation of Israel, or to the Davidic king. But nowhere else does the Bible speak of someone being God’s “one and only Son.” Being the one and only (“begotten,” KJV) Son of God means that Jesus, unlike the rest of us, is not adopted into the family of God but is rather the eternal Son of God, the second person of the Trinity.

Reference:   This We Believe, John Armstrong and John Woodbridge, ed. Zondervan, 2000, p. 67.


2.
The Gospel is so simple that a small child can understand it, and it is so profound that studies by the wisest theologians will never exhaust its riches.

The Gospel is so simple that a small child can understand it, and it is so profound that studies by the wisest theologians will never exhaust its riches.

Reference:   This We Believe, John Armstrong and John Woodbridge, ed. Zondervan, 2000, p. 70.


3.
This Gospel anticipates a world far different from C.S. Lewis’s Narnia, where it is “always winter, and never Christmas.” The promise of the Gospel is that it is “always Christmas.” To be “in Christ” is to enjoy each morning as a Christmas morning with the family of God, celebrating the gift of God around the tree of life.

This Gospel anticipates a world far different from C.S. Lewis’s Narnia, where it is “always winter, and never Christmas.” The promise of the Gospel is that it is “always Christmas.” To be “in Christ” is to enjoy each morning as a Christmas morning with the family of God, celebrating the gift of God around the tree of life.

Reference:   This We Believe, John Armstrong and John Woodbridge, ed. Zondervan, 2000, p. 76.


4.
The good news is that in the face of Jesus Christ we see the very face of God, the One who has decided to be with us and for us in spite of our sin.

The good news is that in the face of Jesus Christ we see the very face of God, the One who has decided to be with us and for us in spite of our sin.

Reference:   This We Believe, John Armstrong and John Woodbridge, ed. Zondervan, 2000, p. 75.