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Quotes of Author: Jerry-bridges

1.
The exercise of inner strength under the direction of sound judgment that enables us to do, think, and say the things that are pleasing to God. 

The exercise of inner strength under the direction of sound judgment that enables us to do, think, and say the things that are pleasing to God.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Self-Control
2.
Prayer assumes the sovereignty of God. If God is not sovereign, we have no assurance that He is able to answer our prayers. Our prayers would become nothing more than wishes. But while God’s sovereignty, along with His wisdom and love, is the foundation of our trust in Him, prayer is the expression of trust.

Prayer assumes the sovereignty of God. If God is not sovereign, we have no assurance that He is able to answer our prayers. Our prayers would become nothing more than wishes. But while God’s sovereignty, along with His wisdom and love, is the foundation of our trust in Him, prayer is the expression of trust.

Reference:   Copied from Is God Really In Control? Trusting God in a World of Hurt by Jerry Bridges, copyright 2006, p. 69-70. Used by permission of NavPress - www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.


3.
We do not have the ability to enter the kingdom unless the Spirit of God gives us life through the new birth. We are born again, then, by a sovereign, monergistic (that is, the Spirit working alone) act of the Holy Spirit. Then, as a result of that new birth, we exercise the faith given to us, and enter the kingdom of God.

We do not have the ability to enter the kingdom unless the Spirit of God gives us life through the new birth. We are born again, then, by a sovereign, monergistic (that is, the Spirit working alone) act of the Holy Spirit. Then, as a result of that new birth, we exercise the faith given to us, and enter the kingdom of God.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 133. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Born_Again
4.
The object of our faith is not the mere content of the message, but the One whom the message is about.

The object of our faith is not the mere content of the message, but the One whom the message is about.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 106. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Faith-Saving
5.
We must not allow our emotions to hold sway over our minds. Rather, we must seek to let the truth of God rule our minds. Our emotions must become subservient to the truth.

We must not allow our emotions to hold sway over our minds. Rather, we must seek to let the truth of God rule our minds. Our emotions must become subservient to the truth.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 140.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!  


6.
Bitterness arises in our hearts when we do not trust in the sovereign rule of God in our lives.

Bitterness arises in our hearts when we do not trust in the sovereign rule of God in our lives.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 120. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Bitterness
7.
Uncontrolled temper is soon dissipated on others. Resentment, bitterness, and self-pity build up inside our hearts and eat away at our spiritual lives like a slowly spreading cancer.

Uncontrolled temper is soon dissipated on others. Resentment, bitterness, and self-pity build up inside our hearts and eat away at our spiritual lives like a slowly spreading cancer.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 141. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!  


8.
The daily experience of Christ’s love is linked to our obedience to Him. It is not that His love is conditioned on our obedience. That would be legalism. But our experience of His love is dependent upon our obedience.

The daily experience of Christ’s love is linked to our obedience to Him. It is not that His love is conditioned on our obedience. That would be legalism. But our experience of His love is dependent upon our obedience.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 154. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.


9.
The extent of God’s love at Calvary is seen in both the infinite cost to Him of giving His one and only Son, and in the wretched and miserable condition of those He loved. God could not remove our sins without an infinite cost to both Himself and His Son. And because of their great love for us, both were willing—yes more than merely willing—to pay that great cost, the Father in giving His one and only Son, and the Son in laying down His life for us. One of the essential characteristics of love is the element of self-sacrifice, and this was demonstrated for us to its ultimate in God’s love at Calvary.

The extent of God’s love at Calvary is seen in both the infinite cost to Him of giving His one and only Son, and in the wretched and miserable condition of those He loved. God could not remove our sins without an infinite cost to both Himself and His Son. And because of their great love for us, both were willing—yes more than merely willing—to pay that great cost, the Father in giving His one and only Son, and the Son in laying down His life for us. One of the essential characteristics of love is the element of self-sacrifice, and this was demonstrated for us to its ultimate in God’s love at Calvary.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 138. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com, All rights reserved. Get this book!


10.
We must not lose sight of the fact that God’s wrath is very real and very justified. We have all sinned incessantly against a holy, righteous God. We have rebelled willfully against His commands, defied His moral law, and acted in total defiance of His known will for us. Because of these actions were justly objects of His wrath.

We must not lose sight of the fact that God’s wrath is very real and very justified. We have all sinned incessantly against a holy, righteous God. We have rebelled willfully against His commands, defied His moral law, and acted in total defiance of His known will for us. Because of these actions were justly objects of His wrath.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 139.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: God-Wrath
11.
God’s wrath arises from His intense, settled hatred of all sin and is the tangible expression of His inflexible determination to punish it. We might say God’s wrath is His justice in action, rendering to everyone his just due, which, because of our sin, is always judgment.

God’s wrath arises from His intense, settled hatred of all sin and is the tangible expression of His inflexible determination to punish it. We might say God’s wrath is His justice in action, rendering to everyone his just due, which, because of our sin, is always judgment.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 52. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: God-Wrath
12.
God, by the very perfection of His moral nature, cannot but be angry at sin – not only because of its destructiveness to humans, but, more important, because of its assault on His divine majesty. This is not the mere petulance of an offended deity because His commands are not obeyed. It is rather the necessary response of God to uphold His moral authority in His universe. And though God’s wrath does not contain the sinful emotions associated with human wrath, it does contain a fierce intensity arising from His settled opposition to sin and His determination to punish it to the utmost.

God, by the very perfection of His moral nature, cannot but be angry at sin – not only because of its destructiveness to humans, but, more important, because of its assault on His divine majesty. This is not the mere petulance of an offended deity because His commands are not obeyed. It is rather the necessary response of God to uphold His moral authority in His universe. And though God’s wrath does not contain the sinful emotions associated with human wrath, it does contain a fierce intensity arising from His settled opposition to sin and His determination to punish it to the utmost.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 53. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: God-Wrath
13.
God does not believe for us, but He does through His Spirit create spiritual life in us so that we can believe. Faith is a gift of God. It is part of the whole salvation package that God gives to us through the work of Christ for us and the work of the Holy Spirit in us. It is not our contribution, so to speak, to God’s great plan of salvation. God does it all. Faith is part of the unsearchable riches of Christ.

God does not believe for us, but He does through His Spirit create spiritual life in us so that we can believe. Faith is a gift of God. It is part of the whole salvation package that God gives to us through the work of Christ for us and the work of the Holy Spirit in us. It is not our contribution, so to speak, to God’s great plan of salvation. God does it all. Faith is part of the unsearchable riches of Christ.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 135. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


14.
I fear that all too often Christians may be less humane and considerate than nonbelievers. We think we are standing on principle when in reality we may be only insisting on our opinion.

I fear that all too often Christians may be less humane and considerate than nonbelievers. We think we are standing on principle when in reality we may be only insisting on our opinion.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 187. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!  


15.
The promises of the Bible are nothing more than God’s covenant to be faithful to His people. It is His character that makes these promises valid.

The promises of the Bible are nothing more than God’s covenant to be faithful to His people. It is His character that makes these promises valid.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 115-116. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com, All rights reserved.  Get this book!


16.
Patience is the ability to suffer a long time under the mistreatment of others without growing resentful or bitter.

Patience is the ability to suffer a long time under the mistreatment of others without growing resentful or bitter.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 168. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Patience
17.
The cure for impatience with the fulfillment of God’s timetable is to believe His promises, obey His will, and leave the results to Him. So often when God’s timetable stretches into years we become discouraged and…want to give up or try to work something out on [our] own.

The cure for impatience with the fulfillment of God’s timetable is to believe His promises, obey His will, and leave the results to Him. So often when God’s timetable stretches into years we become discouraged and…want to give up or try to work something out on [our] own.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 176. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Patience
18.
Every day God patiently bears with us, and every day we are tempted to become impatient with our friends, neighbors, and loved ones. And our faults and failures before God are so much more serious than the petty actions of others that tend to irritate us! God calls us to graciously bear with the weaknesses of others, tolerating them and forgiving them even as He has forgiven us.

Every day God patiently bears with us, and every day we are tempted to become impatient with our friends, neighbors, and loved ones. And our faults and failures before God are so much more serious than the petty actions of others that tend to irritate us! God calls us to graciously bear with the weaknesses of others, tolerating them and forgiving them even as He has forgiven us.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 174. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Patience
19.
Patience does not ignore the provocations of others; it simply seeks to respond to them in a godly manner. It enables us to control our tempers when we are provoked and to seek to deal with the person and his provocation in a way that tends to heal relationships rather than aggravate problems. It seeks the ultimate good of the other individual, rather than the immediate satisfaction of our own aroused emotions.

Patience does not ignore the provocations of others; it simply seeks to respond to them in a godly manner. It enables us to control our tempers when we are provoked and to seek to deal with the person and his provocation in a way that tends to heal relationships rather than aggravate problems. It seeks the ultimate good of the other individual, rather than the immediate satisfaction of our own aroused emotions.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 171-172. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Patience
20.
The fruit of patience in all its aspects – long-suffering, forbearance, endurance, and perseverance – is a fruit that is most intimately associated with our devotion to God. All character traits of godliness grow out of and have their foundation in our devotion to God, but the fruit of patience must grow out of that relationship in a particular way.

The fruit of patience in all its aspects – long-suffering, forbearance, endurance, and perseverance – is a fruit that is most intimately associated with our devotion to God. All character traits of godliness grow out of and have their foundation in our devotion to God, but the fruit of patience must grow out of that relationship in a particular way.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 179. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Patience
21.
God has given each of us a conscience, a moral compass within our hearts, bearing witness to His Law. In sinful or self-righteous people (that is, people whose dominant characteristics are either obvious sin or obvious self-righteousness) the conscience is to some degree “hardened.” That is, it is relatively insensitive to sin or its own self-righteousness. But in a growing Christian the conscience becomes more and more sensitive to violations of God’s Law. As a result, our consciences continually indict us, accusing us of not only particular sins, but, more important, of our overall sinfulness. We recognize more and more that specific acts of sin are simply the expressions of our still-wicked hearts.

God has given each of us a conscience, a moral compass within our hearts, bearing witness to His Law. In sinful or self-righteous people (that is, people whose dominant characteristics are either obvious sin or obvious self-righteousness) the conscience is to some degree “hardened.” That is, it is relatively insensitive to sin or its own self-righteousness. But in a growing Christian the conscience becomes more and more sensitive to violations of God’s Law. As a result, our consciences continually indict us, accusing us of not only particular sins, but, more important, of our overall sinfulness. We recognize more and more that specific acts of sin are simply the expressions of our still-wicked hearts.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 70. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Conscience
22.
God’s wisdom is fathomless, His decisions are unsearchable, His methods are mysterious and untraceable. No one has ever even understood His mind, let alone advised Him on the proper course of action. How futile and even arrogant for us to seek to determine what God is doing in a particular event or circumstance. We simply cannot search out the reasons behind His decisions or trace out the ways by which He brings those decisions to pass.

God’s wisdom is fathomless, His decisions are unsearchable, His methods are mysterious and untraceable. No one has ever even understood His mind, let alone advised Him on the proper course of action. How futile and even arrogant for us to seek to determine what God is doing in a particular event or circumstance. We simply cannot search out the reasons behind His decisions or trace out the ways by which He brings those decisions to pass.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 126. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


23.
Grace stands in direct opposition to any supposed worthiness on our part. To say it another way: Grace and works are mutually exclusive. As Paul said in Romans 11:6, “And if by grace, then it is no longer by works; if it were, grace would no longer be grace.” Our relationship with God is based on either works or grace. There is never a works-plus-grace relationship with Him.

Grace stands in direct opposition to any supposed worthiness on our part. To say it another way: Grace and works are mutually exclusive. As Paul said in Romans 11:6, “And if by grace, then it is no longer by works; if it were, grace would no longer be grace.” Our relationship with God is based on either works or grace. There is never a works-plus-grace relationship with Him.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 22. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


24.
As we prayerfully expose ourselves to the Scriptures, we begin to understand what God’s will is regarding our conduct and character. And then as the Holy Spirit applies His word to specific areas of our lives, and as we are obedient to His promptings, we begin to develop Bible-based convictions. Our values begin to change so that God’s standard becomes our delight and our desire.

As we prayerfully expose ourselves to the Scriptures, we begin to understand what God’s will is regarding our conduct and character. And then as the Holy Spirit applies His word to specific areas of our lives, and as we are obedient to His promptings, we begin to develop Bible-based convictions. Our values begin to change so that God’s standard becomes our delight and our desire.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 124. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Bible-Power
25.
Heart in Scripture is used in various ways. Sometimes it means our reason or understanding, sometimes our affections and emotion, and sometimes our will. Generally it denotes the whole soul of man and all its faculties, not individually, but as they all work together in doing good or evil. The mind as it reasons, discerns, and judges; the emotions as they like or dislike; the conscience as it determines and warns; and the will as it chooses or refuses – are all together called the heart.

Heart in Scripture is used in various ways. Sometimes it means our reason or understanding, sometimes our affections and emotion, and sometimes our will. Generally it denotes the whole soul of man and all its faculties, not individually, but as they all work together in doing good or evil. The mind as it reasons, discerns, and judges; the emotions as they like or dislike; the conscience as it determines and warns; and the will as it chooses or refuses – are all together called the heart.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 61. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Heart
26.
Biblical love is not emotions or feelings, but attitudes and actions that seek the best interests of the other person, regardless of how we feel toward him.

Biblical love is not emotions or feelings, but attitudes and actions that seek the best interests of the other person, regardless of how we feel toward him.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 208. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com.  All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Love-Defined
27.
Love binds together all virtues of Christian character. Love is not so much a character trait as the inner disposition of the soul that produces them all… Though love may be more a motivational force than an actual display of Christian virtue, it always results in actions on our part. Love inclines us and directs us to be kind, to forgive, to give of ourselves to one another.

Love binds together all virtues of Christian character. Love is not so much a character trait as the inner disposition of the soul that produces them all… Though love may be more a motivational force than an actual display of Christian virtue, it always results in actions on our part. Love inclines us and directs us to be kind, to forgive, to give of ourselves to one another.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 203. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Love-Defined
28.
God’s plan and His ways of working out His plan are frequently beyond our ability to fathom and understand. We must learn to trust when we don’t understand.

God’s plan and His ways of working out His plan are frequently beyond our ability to fathom and understand. We must learn to trust when we don’t understand.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 20.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


29.
No detail of your life is too insignificant for your heavenly Father’s attention; no circumstance is so big that He cannot control it.

No detail of your life is too insignificant for your heavenly Father’s attention; no circumstance is so big that He cannot control it.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 40.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Faith-God-in
30.
God is sovereign over people. He will move their hearts to cause them to do His will, or He will restrain them from doing anything contrary to His will. But it is His will, His agenda for our lives, that God will guard, protect, and advance. We must learn to live by His agenda if we are to trust Him.

God is sovereign over people. He will move their hearts to cause them to do His will, or He will restrain them from doing anything contrary to His will. But it is His will, His agenda for our lives, that God will guard, protect, and advance. We must learn to live by His agenda if we are to trust Him.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 71.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Faith-God-in
31.
But though we should never ask a demanding “why?” we may and should ask God to enable us to understand what He may be teaching us through a particular experience. But even here we must be careful that we are not seeking to satisfy our souls by finding some spiritual “good” in the adversity. Rather we must trust God that He is working in the experience for our good, even when we see no beneficial results. We must learn to trust God when He doesn’t tell us why, when we don’t understand what He is doing.

But though we should never ask a demanding “why?” we may and should ask God to enable us to understand what He may be teaching us through a particular experience. But even here we must be careful that we are not seeking to satisfy our souls by finding some spiritual “good” in the adversity. Rather we must trust God that He is working in the experience for our good, even when we see no beneficial results. We must learn to trust God when He doesn’t tell us why, when we don’t understand what He is doing.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 125.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Faith-God-in
32.
God is able to work with or without human means. Though He most often uses them, He is not dependent upon them. Furthermore, He will frequently use some means altogether different from that which we would have expected. Sometimes our prayers for deliverance from some particular strait are accompanied by faith to the extent we can foresee some predictable means of deliverance. But God is not dependent upon means that we can foresee. In fact, it seems from experience that God delights to surprise us by His ways of deliverance to remind us that our trust must be in Him and Him alone.

God is able to work with or without human means. Though He most often uses them, He is not dependent upon them. Furthermore, He will frequently use some means altogether different from that which we would have expected. Sometimes our prayers for deliverance from some particular strait are accompanied by faith to the extent we can foresee some predictable means of deliverance. But God is not dependent upon means that we can foresee. In fact, it seems from experience that God delights to surprise us by His ways of deliverance to remind us that our trust must be in Him and Him alone.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 203.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Faith-God-in
33.
In order to trust God, we must always view our adverse circumstances through the eyes of faith, not of sense. And just as the faith of salvation comes through hearing the message of the gospel (Romans 10:17), so the faith to trust God in adversity comes through the Word of God alone. It is only in the Scriptures that we find an adequate view of God’s relationship to and involvement in our painful circumstances. It is only from the Scriptures, applied to our hearts by the Holy Spirit, that we receive the grace to trust God in adversity.

In order to trust God, we must always view our adverse circumstances through the eyes of faith, not of sense. And just as the faith of salvation comes through hearing the message of the gospel (Romans 10:17), so the faith to trust God in adversity comes through the Word of God alone. It is only in the Scriptures that we find an adequate view of God’s relationship to and involvement in our painful circumstances. It is only from the Scriptures, applied to our hearts by the Holy Spirit, that we receive the grace to trust God in adversity.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 18.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


34.
I acknowledge it often seems more difficult to trust God than to obey Him. The moral will of God given to us in the Bible is rational and reasonable. The circumstances in which we must trust God often appear irrational and inexplicable….Obeying God is worked out within well-defined boundaries of God’s revealed will. Trusting God is worked out in an arena that has no boundaries. We do not know the extent, the duration, or the frequency of the painful, adverse circumstances in which we must frequently trust God. We are always coping with the unknown.

I acknowledge it often seems more difficult to trust God than to obey Him. The moral will of God given to us in the Bible is rational and reasonable. The circumstances in which we must trust God often appear irrational and inexplicable….Obeying God is worked out within well-defined boundaries of God’s revealed will. Trusting God is worked out in an arena that has no boundaries. We do not know the extent, the duration, or the frequency of the painful, adverse circumstances in which we must frequently trust God. We are always coping with the unknown.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 17.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Faith-God-in
35.
It is just as important to trust God as it is to obey Him. When we disobey God we defy His authority and despise His holiness. But when we fail to trust God we doubt His sovereignty and question His goodness. In both cases we cast aspersions upon His majesty and His character. God views our distrust of Him as seriously as He views our disobedience.

It is just as important to trust God as it is to obey Him. When we disobey God we defy His authority and despise His holiness. But when we fail to trust God we doubt His sovereignty and question His goodness. In both cases we cast aspersions upon His majesty and His character. God views our distrust of Him as seriously as He views our disobedience.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 18.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Faith-God-in
36.
True salvation brings with it a desire to be made holy. When God saves us through Christ, He not only saves us from the penalty of sin, but also from its dominion.

True salvation brings with it a desire to be made holy. When God saves us through Christ, He not only saves us from the penalty of sin, but also from its dominion.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 34. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


37.
Only one who has a strong desire to be holy will ever persevere in the painfully slow and difficult task of pursing holiness. There are too many failures. The habits of our old nature and the attacks of Satan are too strong for us to persevere unless the Holy Spirit is at work in us to create a desire for holiness. The Holy Spirit creates this desire, not only by showing us our sins, but also by showing us God’s standard of holiness. He does this through the Scriptures. As we read and study the Scriptures or hear them taught, we are captivated by the moral beauty of God’s standard of holiness.

Only one who has a strong desire to be holy will ever persevere in the painfully slow and difficult task of pursing holiness. There are too many failures. The habits of our old nature and the attacks of Satan are too strong for us to persevere unless the Holy Spirit is at work in us to create a desire for holiness. The Holy Spirit creates this desire, not only by showing us our sins, but also by showing us God’s standard of holiness. He does this through the Scriptures. As we read and study the Scriptures or hear them taught, we are captivated by the moral beauty of God’s standard of holiness.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 74. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.


38.
Our reliance on the Spirit is not intended to foster an attitude of “I can’t do it,” but one of “I can do it through Him who strengthens me.” The Christian should never complain of want of ability and power.

Our reliance on the Spirit is not intended to foster an attitude of “I can’t do it,” but one of “I can do it through Him who strengthens me.” The Christian should never complain of want of ability and power.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 80. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


39.
God’s providence is His constant care for and His absolute rule over all His creation for His own glory and the good of His people.

God’s providence is His constant care for and His absolute rule over all His creation for His own glory and the good of His people.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 25.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: God-Providence
40.
We may say that providence is God’s orchestrating all events and circumstances in the universe for His glory and the good of His people (Rom. 8:28).

We may say that providence is God’s orchestrating all events and circumstances in the universe for His glory and the good of His people (Rom. 8:28).

Reference:   The Providence of Jesus, Tabletalk, June 2008, p. 50, Used by Permission.


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: God-Providence
41.
Have you ever thought about what it means to love God with all your heart, soul, and mind? I don’t think any of us fully plumb the depths of that commandment, but here are some obvious aspects:1. Your love for God transcends all other desires (see Exodus 20:3).2. Like David, you long to gaze upon His beauty and seek fellowship with Him (see Psalm 27:4).3. You rejoice in meditating on His Word, and, like Jesus, you rise early to pray (Psalm 119:97, Mark 1:35).4. You always delight to do His will, regardless of how difficult it may be (see Psalm 40:8, NASB).5. A regard for His glory governs and motivates everything you do – your eating and drinking, your working and playing, your buying and selling, your reading and speaking – and, dare I mention it, even your driving (see 1 Corinthians 10:31).6. You are never discouraged or frustrated by adverse circumstances because you are confident God is working all things together for your good (see Romans 8:28).7. You recognize His sovereignty in every event of your life and consequently receive both success and failure from His hand (see 1 Samuel 2:7; Psalm 75:6-7).8. You are always content because you know He will never leave you or forsake you (see Hebrews 13:5).9. The first petition in the Lord’s Prayer, “Hallowed be your name,” is the most important prayer you pray (see Matthew 6:9).

Have you ever thought about what it means to love God with all your heart, soul, and mind? I don’t think any of us fully plumb the depths of that commandment, but here are some obvious aspects: 1. Your love for God transcends all other desires (see Exodus 20:3). 2. Like David, you long to gaze upon His beauty and seek fellowship with Him (see Psalm 27:4). 3. You rejoice in meditating on His Word, and, like Jesus, you rise early to pray (Psalm 119:97, Mark 1:35). 4. You always delight to do His will, regardless of how difficult it may be (see Psalm 40:8, NASB). 5. A regard for His glory governs and motivates everything you do – your eating and drinking, your working and playing, your buying and selling, your reading and speaking – and, dare I mention it, even your driving (see 1 Corinthians 10:31). 6. You are never discouraged or frustrated by adverse circumstances because you are confident God is working all things together for your good (see Romans 8:28). 7. You recognize His sovereignty in every event of your life and consequently receive both success and failure from His hand (see 1 Samuel 2:7; Psalm 75:6-7). 8. You are always content because you know He will never leave you or forsake you (see Hebrews 13:5). 9. The first petition in the Lord’s Prayer, “Hallowed be your name,” is the most important prayer you pray (see Matthew 6:9).

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 26-27. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Love-God-for
42.
Before we can learn the sufficiency of God’s grace, we must learn the insufficiency of ourselves. The more we see our sinfulness, the more we appreciate grace in its basic meaning of God’s undeserved favor. In a similar manner, the more we see our frailty, weakness, and dependence, the more we appreciate God’s grace in its dimension of His divine assistance. Just as grace shines more brilliantly against the dark background of our sin, so it also shines more brilliantly against the background of our human weakness.

Before we can learn the sufficiency of God’s grace, we must learn the insufficiency of ourselves. The more we see our sinfulness, the more we appreciate grace in its basic meaning of God’s undeserved favor. In a similar manner, the more we see our frailty, weakness, and dependence, the more we appreciate God’s grace in its dimension of His divine assistance. Just as grace shines more brilliantly against the dark background of our sin, so it also shines more brilliantly against the background of our human weakness.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 144. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


43.
One great paradox of the Christian life is that we are fully responsible for our Christian growth and at the same time fully dependent upon the Holy Spirit to give us both the desire to grow and the ability to do it.  God’s grace does not negate the need for responsible action on our part, but rather makes it possible.

One great paradox of the Christian life is that we are fully responsible for our Christian growth and at the same time fully dependent upon the Holy Spirit to give us both the desire to grow and the ability to do it.  God’s grace does not negate the need for responsible action on our part, but rather makes it possible.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 198. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


44.
Wisdom [is] an understanding and application of the moral principles of God.

Wisdom [is] an understanding and application of the moral principles of God.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 89. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com, All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Wisdom-Human
45.
Few things are as dishonoring to the cause of Christ as Christians quarreling among themselves. Yet we expel people from our fellowship for adultery, while we tolerate discord between ourselves and other believers. We have failed to understand and obey the biblical imperative to “make every effort to do what leads to peace.”

Few things are as dishonoring to the cause of Christ as Christians quarreling among themselves. Yet we expel people from our fellowship for adultery, while we tolerate discord between ourselves and other believers. We have failed to understand and obey the biblical imperative to “make every effort to do what leads to peace.”

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 163. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Conflict-Church
46.
In…the instances where faith is mentioned (in Matthew 9), the object of faith was in Jesus’ ability to heal, not His will to heal. Today as we pray for the healing of our friends or loved ones who suffer severe illness or disease, we too should believe that God is able to heal, either directly or through conventional means. To say I have faith that God will heal is presumptuous since we do not know the mind of God, but to say God is able to heal is to exercise faith.

In…the instances where faith is mentioned (in Matthew 9), the object of faith was in Jesus’ ability to heal, not His will to heal. Today as we pray for the healing of our friends or loved ones who suffer severe illness or disease, we too should believe that God is able to heal, either directly or through conventional means. To say I have faith that God will heal is presumptuous since we do not know the mind of God, but to say God is able to heal is to exercise faith.

Reference:   Jesus’ Healing Ministry, Tabletalk, April, 2008. Used by Permission.


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Health-Physical
47.
Compassion is the deep feeling of sharing in the suffering of another and the desire to relieve that suffering.

Compassion is the deep feeling of sharing in the suffering of another and the desire to relieve that suffering.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 188.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Compassion
48.
The person who is living by grace sees this vast contrast between his own sins against God and the offenses of others against him. He forgives others because he himself has been so graciously forgiven. He realizes that, by receiving God’s forgiveness through Christ, he has forfeited the right to be offended when others hurt him. 

The person who is living by grace sees this vast contrast between his own sins against God and the offenses of others against him. He forgives others because he himself has been so graciously forgiven. He realizes that, by receiving God’s forgiveness through Christ, he has forfeited the right to be offended when others hurt him. 

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 44-45. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


49.
We need to call sin what the Bible calls it and not soften it with modern expressions borrowed from our culture.

We need to call sin what the Bible calls it and not soften it with modern expressions borrowed from our culture.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 28. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Sin-Defined
50.
To be justified means more than to be declared “not guilty.” It actually means to be declared righteous before God. It means God has imputed or charged the guilt of our sin to His Son, Jesus Christ, and has imputed or credited Christ’s righteousness to us.

To be justified means more than to be declared “not guilty.” It actually means to be declared righteous before God. It means God has imputed or charged the guilt of our sin to His Son, Jesus Christ, and has imputed or credited Christ’s righteousness to us.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 36. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


51.
As we come to Christ, then, empty-handed, claiming no merit of our own, but clinging by faith to His blood and righteousness, we are justified. We pass immediately from a state of condemnation and spiritual death to a state of pardon, acceptance, and the sure hope of eternal life. Our sins are blotted out, and we are “clothed” with the righteousness of Jesus Christ. In our standing before God, we will never be more righteous, even in heaven, than we were the day we trusted Christ, or we are now. Obviously in our daily experience we fall far short of the perfect righteousness God requires. But because He has imputed to us the perfect righteousness of His Son, He now sees us as being just as righteous as Christ Himself.

As we come to Christ, then, empty-handed, claiming no merit of our own, but clinging by faith to His blood and righteousness, we are justified. We pass immediately from a state of condemnation and spiritual death to a state of pardon, acceptance, and the sure hope of eternal life. Our sins are blotted out, and we are “clothed” with the righteousness of Jesus Christ. In our standing before God, we will never be more righteous, even in heaven, than we were the day we trusted Christ, or we are now. Obviously in our daily experience we fall far short of the perfect righteousness God requires. But because He has imputed to us the perfect righteousness of His Son, He now sees us as being just as righteous as Christ Himself.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 107. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


52.
The Bible is full of God’s promises to provide for us spiritually and materially, to never forsake us, to give us peace in times of difficult circumstances, to cause all circumstances to work together for our good, and finally to bring us safely home to glory. Not one of those promises is dependent upon our performance. They are all dependent on the grace of God given to us through Jesus Christ.

The Bible is full of God’s promises to provide for us spiritually and materially, to never forsake us, to give us peace in times of difficult circumstances, to cause all circumstances to work together for our good, and finally to bring us safely home to glory. Not one of those promises is dependent upon our performance. They are all dependent on the grace of God given to us through Jesus Christ.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 71. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: God-Promises
53.
We have to take control of our bodies, and make them our servants instead of our masters.

We have to take control of our bodies, and make them our servants instead of our masters.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 111. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Body
54.
To put to death the misdeeds of the body, then, is to destroy the strength and vitality of sin as it tries to reign in our bodies.

To put to death the misdeeds of the body, then, is to destroy the strength and vitality of sin as it tries to reign in our bodies.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 84. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Body
55.
Quite possibly there is no greater conformity to the world among evangelical Christians today than the way in which we, instead of presenting our bodies as holy sacrifices, pamper and indulge them in defiance of our better judgment and our Christian purpose in life.

Quite possibly there is no greater conformity to the world among evangelical Christians today than the way in which we, instead of presenting our bodies as holy sacrifices, pamper and indulge them in defiance of our better judgment and our Christian purpose in life.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 109. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Body
56.
As we become soft and lazy in our bodies, we tend to become soft and lazy spiritually. When Paul talked about making his body his slave, so that after having preached to others he himself would not be disqualified, he was not thinking about physical disqualification, but spiritual. He knew well that physical softness inevitably leads to spiritual softness. When the body is pampered and indulged, the instincts and passions of the body tend to get the upper hand and dominate our thoughts and actions. We tend to do not what we should do, but what we want to do, as we follow the craving of our sinful nature.

As we become soft and lazy in our bodies, we tend to become soft and lazy spiritually. When Paul talked about making his body his slave, so that after having preached to others he himself would not be disqualified, he was not thinking about physical disqualification, but spiritual. He knew well that physical softness inevitably leads to spiritual softness. When the body is pampered and indulged, the instincts and passions of the body tend to get the upper hand and dominate our thoughts and actions. We tend to do not what we should do, but what we want to do, as we follow the craving of our sinful nature.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 111. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


57.
Legalism insists on conformity to manmade religious rules and requirements, which are often unspoken but are nevertheless very real… There are far too many instances within Christendom where our traditions and rules are, in practice, more important than God’s commands.

Legalism insists on conformity to manmade religious rules and requirements, which are often unspoken but are nevertheless very real… There are far too many instances within Christendom where our traditions and rules are, in practice, more important than God’s commands.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 120. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


58.
[We insist that God] must surely lead everyone as we believe He has led us. We refuse to allow God the freedom to deal with each of us as individuals. When we think like that, we are legalistic.

[We insist that God] must surely lead everyone as we believe He has led us. We refuse to allow God the freedom to deal with each of us as individuals. When we think like that, we are legalistic.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 126. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. 


59.
Legalism does not consist in yielding obedience to the law. Rather, it is to seek justification and good standing with God through the merit of works done in obedience to the law – instead of by faith in Christ.

Legalism does not consist in yielding obedience to the law. Rather, it is to seek justification and good standing with God through the merit of works done in obedience to the law – instead of by faith in Christ.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 91. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


60.
Thankfulness to God is a recognition that God in His goodness and faithfulness has provided for us and cared for us, both physically and spiritually.  It is a recognition that we are totally dependent upon Him; that all that we are and have comes from God.

Thankfulness to God is a recognition that God in His goodness and faithfulness has provided for us and cared for us, both physically and spiritually.  It is a recognition that we are totally dependent upon Him; that all that we are and have comes from God.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness NavPress, 1996, p. 100. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Gratitude
61.
As a young Christian I had the idea that all I had to do to live a holy life was to find out from the Bible what God wanted me to do and go do it. Christians with maturity will smile at this naïve assumption, but I see younger Christians starting off with the same air of self-confidence. We have to learn that we are dependent upon the enabling power of the Holy Spirit to attain any degree of holiness. Then, as we look to Him, we will see Him working in us – revealing our sin, creating a desire for holiness, and giving us the strength to respond to Him in obedience.

As a young Christian I had the idea that all I had to do to live a holy life was to find out from the Bible what God wanted me to do and go do it. Christians with maturity will smile at this naïve assumption, but I see younger Christians starting off with the same air of self-confidence. We have to learn that we are dependent upon the enabling power of the Holy Spirit to attain any degree of holiness. Then, as we look to Him, we will see Him working in us – revealing our sin, creating a desire for holiness, and giving us the strength to respond to Him in obedience.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 76. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


62.
The habits of our old nature and the attacks of Satan are too strong for us to persevere unless the Holy Spirit is at work in us to create a desire for holiness. The Holy Spirit creates this desire, not only by showing us our sins, but also by showing us God’s standard of holiness. He does this through the Scriptures. As we read and study the Scriptures or hear them taught, we are captivated by the moral beauty of God’s standard of holiness.

The habits of our old nature and the attacks of Satan are too strong for us to persevere unless the Holy Spirit is at work in us to create a desire for holiness. The Holy Spirit creates this desire, not only by showing us our sins, but also by showing us God’s standard of holiness. He does this through the Scriptures. As we read and study the Scriptures or hear them taught, we are captivated by the moral beauty of God’s standard of holiness.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 74. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


63.
God has provided all we need for our pursuit of holiness. He has delivered us from the reign of sin and given us His indwelling Holy Spirit. He has revealed His will for holy living in His Word, and He works in us to will and to act according to His good purpose. He has sent pastors and teachers to exhort and encourage us in the path of holiness; and He answers our prayers when we cry to Him for strength against temptation.

God has provided all we need for our pursuit of holiness. He has delivered us from the reign of sin and given us His indwelling Holy Spirit. He has revealed His will for holy living in His Word, and He works in us to will and to act according to His good purpose. He has sent pastors and teachers to exhort and encourage us in the path of holiness; and He answers our prayers when we cry to Him for strength against temptation.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 156. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


64.
God’s justice is inflexible. Justice may be defined as rendering to everyone according to one’s due. Justice means we get exactly what we deserve – nothing more, nothing less. In our human system of justice a tension often exists between justice and mercy. Sometimes one prevails at the expense of the other. But there is no tension with God. Justice always prevails. God’s justice must be satisfied; otherwise His moral government would be undermined.

God’s justice is inflexible. Justice may be defined as rendering to everyone according to one’s due. Justice means we get exactly what we deserve – nothing more, nothing less. In our human system of justice a tension often exists between justice and mercy. Sometimes one prevails at the expense of the other. But there is no tension with God. Justice always prevails. God’s justice must be satisfied; otherwise His moral government would be undermined.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 43. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: God-Justice
65.
God does not exalt His mercy at the expense of His justice. And in order to maintain His justice, all sin without exception must be punished. Contrary to popular opinion, with God there is no such thing as mere forgiveness. There is only justice.

God does not exalt His mercy at the expense of His justice. And in order to maintain His justice, all sin without exception must be punished. Contrary to popular opinion, with God there is no such thing as mere forgiveness. There is only justice.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 43. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: God-Justice
66.
One definition of faith might be “Obeying the revealed will of God and trusting Him for the results.”

One definition of faith might be “Obeying the revealed will of God and trusting Him for the results.”

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 144. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All Rights Reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Faith-Defined
67.
Habits are the thought and emotional patterns engraved on our minds. These internal habit patterns play just as forceful a role as external influences on our actions – in fact, perhaps more so.

Habits are the thought and emotional patterns engraved on our minds. These internal habit patterns play just as forceful a role as external influences on our actions – in fact, perhaps more so.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 132. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Habits
68.
Because we are sinful by nature, we have developed sinful patterns, which we call habits. Discipline is required to break any habit. If a boy has developed the wrong style of swinging a baseball bat, he cannot just decide to change instantly. He has developed a certain habit, and much discipline – much correction and training – is required to break that bad habit and develop a new one. In the same way, our patterns of disobedience to God have been developed over a number of years and are not broken easily or without discipline. Discipline does not mean gritting your teeth and saying, “I’ll not do that anymore.” Rather, discipline means structured, planned training. Just as you need a plan for regular Bible reading or study, so you need a plan for applying the Word to your life.

Because we are sinful by nature, we have developed sinful patterns, which we call habits. Discipline is required to break any habit. If a boy has developed the wrong style of swinging a baseball bat, he cannot just decide to change instantly. He has developed a certain habit, and much discipline – much correction and training – is required to break that bad habit and develop a new one. In the same way, our patterns of disobedience to God have been developed over a number of years and are not broken easily or without discipline. Discipline does not mean gritting your teeth and saying, “I’ll not do that anymore.” Rather, discipline means structured, planned training. Just as you need a plan for regular Bible reading or study, so you need a plan for applying the Word to your life.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 100-101. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Habits
69.
Jesus said, “Any of you who does not give up everything he has cannot be my disciple” (Luke 14:33). We must honestly face the question, “Am I willing to give up a certain practice or habit that is keeping me from holiness?” It is at this point of commitment that most of us fail. We prefer to dally with sin, to try to play with it a little without getting too deeply involved.

Jesus said, “Any of you who does not give up everything he has cannot be my disciple” (Luke 14:33). We must honestly face the question, “Am I willing to give up a certain practice or habit that is keeping me from holiness?” It is at this point of commitment that most of us fail. We prefer to dally with sin, to try to play with it a little without getting too deeply involved.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 91. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Habits
70.
Principles in breaking sinful habits and acquiring new ones:1. Habits are developed and reinforced by frequent repetition.2. Never let an exception occur.3. Diligence in all areas is required to ensure success in one area.4. Don’t be discouraged by failure.

Principles in breaking sinful habits and acquiring new ones: 1. Habits are developed and reinforced by frequent repetition. 2. Never let an exception occur. 3. Diligence in all areas is required to ensure success in one area. 4. Don’t be discouraged by failure.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 133-134. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Habits
71.
Bible reading enables us…to enjoy communion with God as He speaks to us from His word, encouraging us, instructing us, and revealing Himself to us.

Bible reading enables us…to enjoy communion with God as He speaks to us from His word, encouraging us, instructing us, and revealing Himself to us.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 39, www.navpress.com.  Used by Permission. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Bible-Reading
72.
We do have a responsibility to make wise decisions or to discover the will of God, whichever term we may prefer to use. But God’s plan for us is not contingent upon our decisions. God’s plan is not contingent at all. God’s plan is sovereign. It includes our foolish decisions as well as our wise ones.

We do have a responsibility to make wise decisions or to discover the will of God, whichever term we may prefer to use. But God’s plan for us is not contingent upon our decisions. God’s plan is not contingent at all. God’s plan is sovereign. It includes our foolish decisions as well as our wise ones.

Reference:   Trusting God, 1988, p. 170.  Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


73.
We must have conviction that it is God’s will that we seek holiness – regardless of how arduous and painful the seeking may be. And we must be confident that the pursuit of holiness results in God’s approval and blessing, even when circumstances make it appear otherwise.

We must have conviction that it is God’s will that we seek holiness – regardless of how arduous and painful the seeking may be. And we must be confident that the pursuit of holiness results in God’s approval and blessing, even when circumstances make it appear otherwise.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 142. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.


74.
God intends the Christian life to be a life of joy – not drudgery. The idea that holiness is associated with a dour disposition is a caricature of the worst sort. In fact, just the opposite is true. Only those who walk in holiness experience true joy.

God intends the Christian life to be a life of joy – not drudgery. The idea that holiness is associated with a dour disposition is a caricature of the worst sort. In fact, just the opposite is true. Only those who walk in holiness experience true joy.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 154. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


75.
What is holiness? The best practical definition that I have heard is simply “without sin.” That is the statement that was made of the Lord Jesus’ life on earth (Hebrews 4:15), and that should be the goal of every person who desires to be godly. Granted, we will never reach that goal in this life; nevertheless it is to be our supreme objective and the object of our most earnest efforts and prayers.

What is holiness? The best practical definition that I have heard is simply “without sin.” That is the statement that was made of the Lord Jesus’ life on earth (Hebrews 4:15), and that should be the goal of every person who desires to be godly. Granted, we will never reach that goal in this life; nevertheless it is to be our supreme objective and the object of our most earnest efforts and prayers.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 121. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


76.
Holiness is nothing less than conformity to the character of God.

Holiness is nothing less than conformity to the character of God.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 22. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


77.
To be holy is to be morally blameless. It is to be separated from sin and, therefore, consecrated to God. The word signifies separation to God, and the conduct befitting those so separated… To live a holy life, then, is to live a life in conformity to the moral precepts of the Bible and in contrast to the sinful ways of the world. It is to live a life characterized by the “(putting) off of your old self, which is being corrupted by its deceitful desires… and (putting) on the new self, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness” (Ephesians 4:22, 24).

To be holy is to be morally blameless. It is to be separated from sin and, therefore, consecrated to God. The word signifies separation to God, and the conduct befitting those so separated… To live a holy life, then, is to live a life in conformity to the moral precepts of the Bible and in contrast to the sinful ways of the world. It is to live a life characterized by the “(putting) off of your old self, which is being corrupted by its deceitful desires… and (putting) on the new self, created to be like God in true righteousness and holiness” (Ephesians 4:22, 24).

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 16. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


78.
There is no question that obedience to God’s commands prompted by fear or merit-seeking is not true obedience. The only obedience acceptable to God is constrained and impelled by love, because “love is the fulfillment of the law” (Romans 13:10). God’s law as revealed in His Word prescribes our duty, but love provides the correct motive for obedience. We obey God’s law, not to be loved, but because we are loved in Christ.

There is no question that obedience to God’s commands prompted by fear or merit-seeking is not true obedience. The only obedience acceptable to God is constrained and impelled by love, because “love is the fulfillment of the law” (Romans 13:10). God’s law as revealed in His Word prescribes our duty, but love provides the correct motive for obedience. We obey God’s law, not to be loved, but because we are loved in Christ.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 92. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


79.
Obedience to the revealed will of God is often just as much a step of faith as claiming a promise from God.

Obedience to the revealed will of God is often just as much a step of faith as claiming a promise from God.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 139. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


80.
God is worthy of my loving obedience because of who He is, not because of what He does.

God is worthy of my loving obedience because of who He is, not because of what He does.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 84. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


81.
In His infinite wisdom, God allows trials in order to develop perseverance in us and to cause us to fix our hopes on the glory that is yet to be revealed… Our faith and perseverance can grow only under the pain of trial.

In His infinite wisdom, God allows trials in order to develop perseverance in us and to cause us to fix our hopes on the glory that is yet to be revealed… Our faith and perseverance can grow only under the pain of trial.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 112. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


82.
Any training – physical, mental, or spiritual – is characterized at first by failure. We fail more often than we succeed. But if we persevere, we gradually see progress till we are succeeding more often than failing. This is true as we seek to put to death particular sins. At first it seems we are making no progress, so we become discouraged and think, What’s the use?! I can never overcome that sin. That is exactly what Satan wants us to think. It is at this point that we must exercise perseverance. We keep wanting instant success, but holiness doesn’t come that way. Our sinful habits are not broken overnight. Follow-through is required to make any change in our lives, and follow-through requires perseverance.

Any training – physical, mental, or spiritual – is characterized at first by failure. We fail more often than we succeed. But if we persevere, we gradually see progress till we are succeeding more often than failing. This is true as we seek to put to death particular sins. At first it seems we are making no progress, so we become discouraged and think, What’s the use?! I can never overcome that sin. That is exactly what Satan wants us to think. It is at this point that we must exercise perseverance. We keep wanting instant success, but holiness doesn’t come that way. Our sinful habits are not broken overnight. Follow-through is required to make any change in our lives, and follow-through requires perseverance.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 102. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


83.
God uses the encouragement of the Scriptures, the hope of our ultimate salvation in glory, and the trials that He either sends or allows to produce endurance and perseverance.

God uses the encouragement of the Scriptures, the hope of our ultimate salvation in glory, and the trials that He either sends or allows to produce endurance and perseverance.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 179. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


84.
We can distinguish [the] two aspects of our union with Christ this way: Our legal union with Christ entitles us to all that Christ did for us as He acted in our place, as our substitute. Our vital union with Christ is the means by which He works in us by His Holy Spirit. The legal union refers to His objective work outside of us that is credited to us through faith. The vital union refers to His subjective work in us, which is also realized through faith as we rely on His Spirit to work in and through us. Though our union with Christ has two aspects, it is one union. We cannot have legal union without also having vital union. If through faith we lay hold of what Christ did for us, we will also begin to experience His workings in us.

We can distinguish [the] two aspects of our union with Christ this way: Our legal union with Christ entitles us to all that Christ did for us as He acted in our place, as our substitute. Our vital union with Christ is the means by which He works in us by His Holy Spirit. The legal union refers to His objective work outside of us that is credited to us through faith. The vital union refers to His subjective work in us, which is also realized through faith as we rely on His Spirit to work in and through us. Though our union with Christ has two aspects, it is one union. We cannot have legal union without also having vital union. If through faith we lay hold of what Christ did for us, we will also begin to experience His workings in us.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 39. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


85.
Just as the diamonds on a jeweler’s counter shine more brilliantly when set upon a dark velvet pad, so Christ’s redemptive work shines more brilliantly when contrasted with our sin and the consequent curse that was upon us.

Just as the diamonds on a jeweler’s counter shine more brilliantly when set upon a dark velvet pad, so Christ’s redemptive work shines more brilliantly when contrasted with our sin and the consequent curse that was upon us.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 86. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


86.
Because we are united by faith to [Jesus Christ] who is perfectly righteous, God accepts us as perfectly righteous. God does not resort to some kind of legal fiction, calling something righteous that is not. Rather, He declares us righteous on the basis of the real accomplished righteousness of Christ, imputed to us because of our union with Him.

Because we are united by faith to [Jesus Christ] who is perfectly righteous, God accepts us as perfectly righteous. God does not resort to some kind of legal fiction, calling something righteous that is not. Rather, He declares us righteous on the basis of the real accomplished righteousness of Christ, imputed to us because of our union with Him.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 103. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


87.
[Sin] says to an absolutely holy and righteous God that His moral laws, which are a reflection of His own nature, are not worthy of our wholehearted obedience.

[Sin] says to an absolutely holy and righteous God that His moral laws, which are a reflection of His own nature, are not worthy of our wholehearted obedience.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 30. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Sin-Result
88.
The only safe evidence that we are in Christ is a holy life. John said everyone who has within him the hope of eternal life purifies himself just as Christ is pure (1 John 3:3). Paul said, “Those who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God” (Romans 8:14). If we know nothing of holiness, we may flatter ourselves that we are Christians but we do not have the Holy Spirit dwelling within us.

The only safe evidence that we are in Christ is a holy life. John said everyone who has within him the hope of eternal life purifies himself just as Christ is pure (1 John 3:3). Paul said, “Those who are led by the Spirit of God are sons of God” (Romans 8:14). If we know nothing of holiness, we may flatter ourselves that we are Christians but we do not have the Holy Spirit dwelling within us.

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 38. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


89.
Three means by which God assures us that we do have eternal life:1. The promises of His Word.2. The witness of the Spirit in our hearts.3. The transforming work of the Spirit in our lives.

Three means by which God assures us that we do have eternal life: 1. The promises of His Word. 2. The witness of the Spirit in our hearts. 3. The transforming work of the Spirit in our lives.

Reference:   Copied from The Gospel for Real Life by Jerry Bridges, © 2002, p. 150. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


90.
Trials always change our relationship with God. Either they drive us to Him, or they drive us away from Him. The extent of our fear of Him and our awareness of His love for us determine in which direction we will move. 

Trials always change our relationship with God. Either they drive us to Him, or they drive us away from Him. The extent of our fear of Him and our awareness of His love for us determine in which direction we will move. 

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 179. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. 


91.
Grace…expresses two complementary thoughts: God’s unmerited favor to us through Christ, and God’s divine assistance to us through the Holy Spirit.

Grace…expresses two complementary thoughts: God’s unmerited favor to us through Christ, and God’s divine assistance to us through the Holy Spirit.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 98-99. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com, All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Grace-Defined
92.
Grace is God’s free and unmerited favor shown to guilty sinners who deserve only judgment.  It is the love of God shown to the unlovely. It is God reaching downward to people who are in rebellion against Him.

Grace is God’s free and unmerited favor shown to guilty sinners who deserve only judgment.  It is the love of God shown to the unlovely. It is God reaching downward to people who are in rebellion against Him.

Reference:   Transforming Grace, NavPress, 1991, p. 21-22. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Grace-Defined
93.
So often we try to develop Christian character and conduct without taking the time to develop God-centered devotion.  We try to please God without taking the time to walk with Him and develop a relationship with Him.  This is impossible to do.

So often we try to develop Christian character and conduct without taking the time to develop God-centered devotion.  We try to please God without taking the time to walk with Him and develop a relationship with Him.  This is impossible to do.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 14, www.navpress.com. Used by Permission.


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: God-Devotion_to
94.
We can build Godlike character only upon the foundation of a whole-hearted devotion to God.  God must be the very focal point of our lives if we wish to have godly character and conduct.  This point cannot be overemphasized.  Too many of us focus on the outward structure of character and conduct without taking the time to build the inward foundation of devotion to God.  This often results in a cold morality or legalism, or even worse, self-righteousness and spiritual pride… Godly character flows out of devotion to God and practically confirms the reality of that devotion.

We can build Godlike character only upon the foundation of a whole-hearted devotion to God. God must be the very focal point of our lives if we wish to have godly character and conduct. This point cannot be overemphasized. Too many of us focus on the outward structure of character and conduct without taking the time to build the inward foundation of devotion to God. This often results in a cold morality or legalism, or even worse, self-righteousness and spiritual pride… Godly character flows out of devotion to God and practically confirms the reality of that devotion.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 54, 55, 56, www.navpress.com. Used by Permission. Get this book!


95.
Godliness is closely akin to holiness in Scripture. Strong’s Concordance lists holiness as a synonym for godliness. Vine says godliness is “that piety which is characterized by a Godward attitude; and does that which is well pleasing to Him” (Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words).

Godliness is closely akin to holiness in Scripture. Strong’s Concordance lists holiness as a synonym for godliness. Vine says godliness is “that piety which is characterized by a Godward attitude; and does that which is well pleasing to Him” (Expository Dictionary of New Testament Words).

Reference:   Copied from The Pursuit of Holiness by Jerry Bridges, © 1996, p. 105. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com. All rights reserved. Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Godliness
96.
[Godliness is a] devotion to God which results in a life that is pleasing to Him.

[Godliness is a] devotion to God which results in a life that is pleasing to Him.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 16. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com.  All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Godliness
97.
Godlike character is both the fruit of the Spirit as He works within us and the result of our personal efforts.  We are both totally dependent upon His working within us and totally responsible for our own character development.  This is an apparent contradiction to our either-or type of thinking, but it is a truth taught over and over in the Scriptures.

Godlike character is both the fruit of the Spirit as He works within us and the result of our personal efforts.  We are both totally dependent upon His working within us and totally responsible for our own character development.  This is an apparent contradiction to our either-or type of thinking, but it is a truth taught over and over in the Scriptures.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 211. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com.  All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Godliness
98.
Godliness is more than Christian character.  It covers the totality of the Christian life and provides the foundation upon which Christian character is built.

Godliness is more than Christian character.  It covers the totality of the Christian life and provides the foundation upon which Christian character is built.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 7. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com.  All rights reserved. 


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Godliness
99.
Godliness is no optional spiritual luxury for a few quaint Christians of a bygone era or for some group of super-saints of today.  It is both the privilege and duty of every Christian to pursue godliness, to train himself to be godly, to study diligently the practice of godliness.  We don’t need any special talent or equipment.  God has given to each one of us “everything we need for life and godliness” (2 Peter 1:3).  The most ordinary Christian has all that he needs, and the most talented Christian must use those same means in the practice of godliness.

Godliness is no optional spiritual luxury for a few quaint Christians of a bygone era or for some group of super-saints of today.  It is both the privilege and duty of every Christian to pursue godliness, to train himself to be godly, to study diligently the practice of godliness.  We don’t need any special talent or equipment.  God has given to each one of us “everything we need for life and godliness” (2 Peter 1:3).  The most ordinary Christian has all that he needs, and the most talented Christian must use those same means in the practice of godliness.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 12. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com.  All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Godliness
100.
The practice of godliness is an exercise or discipline that focuses upon God.  From this Godward attitude arises the character and conduct that we usually think of as godliness.

The practice of godliness is an exercise or discipline that focuses upon God.  From this Godward attitude arises the character and conduct that we usually think of as godliness.

Reference:   The Practice of Godliness, NavPress, 1996, p. 14. Used by permission of NavPress – www.navpress.com.  All rights reserved.  Get this book!


Author: Jerry Bridges
Topics: Godliness