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Quotes of Author: Bob-laforge

1.
The main reason [we do not forgive others is] because we don’t want to. You might not want to forgive because you want to see them suffer for what they did. You might not want to forgive because you want them to feel the same hurt that they made us to feel. You might not want to forgive because you want to give them the message that if they hurt me then they will feel pain also, so they better think twice about hurting me again. You might not want to forgive because you are angry or frustrated. You might not want to forgive because you want revenge. You might not want to forgive because you enjoy playing the victim. You might not want to forgive because you really don’t like that person and you want to keep it that way.

The main reason [we do not forgive others is] because we don't want to. You might not want to forgive because you want to see them suffer for what they did. You might not want to forgive because you want them to feel the same hurt that they made us to feel. You might not want to forgive because you want to give them the message that if they hurt me then they will feel pain also, so they better think twice about hurting me again. You might not want to forgive because you are angry or frustrated. You might not want to forgive because you want revenge. You might not want to forgive because you enjoy playing the victim. You might not want to forgive because you really don't like that person and you want to keep it that way.

Reference:   Class Notes, A New Creation, Disciplescorner.com.


2.
Mercy can never be earned.  Its very necessity is evoked by unworthiness, else there would be no need for it. Because we have sinned, we need mercy, not because we have obeyed. The only qualification for mercy is affliction.

Mercy can never be earned.  Its very necessity is evoked by unworthiness, else there would be no need for it. Because we have sinned, we need mercy, not because we have obeyed. The only qualification for mercy is affliction.

Reference:   Contemplating the Almighty, Perth Publishing, 1984, p. 137.


Author: Bob LaForge
Topics: God-Mercy
3.
How perverted the creature who sins against His Creator and then demands and expects mercy from the just consequences of such… How dare we think that we should be allowed continue in the deceitful pleasures of our sin and then expect mercy when the despairing consequences result. We are called to repent and obey, not expect and demand that which we do not deserve.

How perverted the creature who sins against His Creator and then demands and expects mercy from the just consequences of such… How dare we think that we should be allowed continue in the deceitful pleasures of our sin and then expect mercy when the despairing consequences result. We are called to repent and obey, not expect and demand that which we do not deserve.

Reference:   Contemplating the Almighty, Perth Publishing, 1984, p. 139.


Author: Bob LaForge
Topics: God-Mercy
4.
The damned, instead of getting what they deserve, may be given the opportunity to stand forever in the presence of the High and Holy God. Condemnation may be wholly replaced with justification. Shame may be replaced with glory. Hell may be replaced with heaven. This is pure mercy.

The damned, instead of getting what they deserve, may be given the opportunity to stand forever in the presence of the High and Holy God. Condemnation may be wholly replaced with justification. Shame may be replaced with glory. Hell may be replaced with heaven. This is pure mercy.

Reference:   Contemplating the Almighty, Perth Publishing, 1984, p. 140.


Author: Bob LaForge
Topics: God-Mercy
5.
There is many a believer who forsakes God, but there is never a believer whom God forsakes.

There is many a believer who forsakes God, but there is never a believer whom God forsakes.

Reference:   Contemplating the Almighty, Perth Publishing, 1984, p. 120.


Author: Bob LaForge
6.
[Joy results] not in the despairing circumstances, but in the attitude of delightful dependence on a faithful Father.

[Joy results] not in the despairing circumstances, but in the attitude of delightful dependence on a faithful Father.

Reference:   Contemplating the Almighty, Perth Publishing, 1984, p. 128.


Author: Bob LaForge
Topics: Joy-God
7.
It stands to reason that God would abandon us because of our constant sin, but if that was a reason for Him to leave us, then there never was a reason for Him to have been drawn to us… If He was attracted to us as aliens and hostile in mind, how could He abandon those whom He now calls His children?

It stands to reason that God would abandon us because of our constant sin, but if that was a reason for Him to leave us, then there never was a reason for Him to have been drawn to us… If He was attracted to us as aliens and hostile in mind, how could He abandon those whom He now calls His children?

Reference:   Contemplating the Almighty, Perth Publishing, 1984, p. 121.


8.
Pride wants to earn divine acceptance; humility simply believes it.

Pride wants to earn divine acceptance; humility simply believes it.

Reference:   Contemplating the Almighty, Perth Publishing, 1984, p. 122


9.
To say that God is faithful or consistent is not to imply, however, that He is predictable. Much bitterness toward God results from a misconception of this. Too often we speculate and try to guess the actions of God and, therefore, develop expectations. Through our limited and often perverted reasoning, we determine the “best” for our lives and then consider God’s only reasonable response to be one of quick and complete fulfillment. 

To say that God is faithful or consistent is not to imply, however, that He is predictable. Much bitterness toward God results from a misconception of this. Too often we speculate and try to guess the actions of God and, therefore, develop expectations. Through our limited and often perverted reasoning, we determine the “best” for our lives and then consider God's only reasonable response to be one of quick and complete fulfillment. 

Reference:   Contemplating the Almighty, Perth Publishing, 1984, p. 126.